Question about 2008 kawasaki Ninja 250R

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Front wheel alignment on 2008 250r

I dropped my bike yesterday and now the wheel is about 2 degrees off on my steering. How do i straighten this. Im very new to riding.

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Just loosen then re-align front wheel and tighten it back up - check the manual for torque settings and if there are locking bolts on the forks

Posted on Dec 15, 2008

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I am unable to align the front forks and steering head of the bike. I loosen the four pinch bolts on the the fork legs and align the steering with the front wheel, but after re-tightening the bolts the...


What caused the mis alignment in the first place, if it was a crash , something may be bent.
It can help to loosen the axel bolts as well.
perhaps you may need to pull the forks out and turn the chrome stauntions to see if they are bent
Dont try to straighten forks, this can cause stress fractures

Jul 04, 2011 | 2004 Yamaha FZ6

1 Answer

Had a crash and the wheel is not positioned straight so have to compensate by having the handlebars positioned at a different angle wat should i do


Your front wheel is probably not tracking straight because your fork tubes are out of alignment. This could be caused because the upper and lower tube guides have been knocked out of alignment, because one or both fork tubes themselves are bent, or a combination of the two.

It's pretty easy to check the alignment of your tubes. Put your bike on its kickstand (center stand is better, if you have one) and stand in front of your bike, facing the headlight. Look carefully at where the fork tubes are anchored--they're clamped in right about the handlebars, and they're also clamped in below the headlight. Look at these two clamps and see whether they are completely in alignment. With your handlebars pointing straight ahead, the lower guides shouldn't be cocked to one side or the other. Odds are, you'll find that it will be.
Getting your fork tube clamps back into alignment is relatively straightforward, though straightening them out may also reveal bends in your fork tubes. The easiest way to get these into alignment is to remove your front wheel and then slide out your fork tubes. At this point, you should be able to loosen the clamp on the bottom (and top) of the steering tube--as if you were going to change out your steering bearings--and muscle the upper and lower fork tube clamps back into alignment. You can adjust the upper or the lower clamps (or both), whichever is easier; the goal is to get them both back into alignment.

Some people try to do this procedure with the fork tubes still in the guides--they loosen everything up and then use the forks as levers to pull everything back into alignment--but I haven't had great luck with that method, because the force that generates this condition also often bends the fork tubes, so they won't want to go back to their proper configuration. You and I simply don't have enough strength to straighten bent fork tubes without use of a hydraulic press.

Once your front fork tube clamps are back in alignment, check each of your forks before you re-install them to make sure that they aren't bent. One easy way is to take a straight edge (a ruler will work just fine) and slowly run it around the tube. The straight edge should touch all parts of the upper piece at all times. If you see any air between the straight edge and the fork, it's bent. Fortunately, many bent tubes can be straightened--just about any motorcycle repair shop can do this work or knows a place that can do it--but it's also worth checking around to see whether you can find a set of used forks for less than the cost of the repair. If you have to disassemble one or both of your forks to have the tubes straightened or replaced, it's also a great time to replace your fork seals while you're at it. Re-using the old seals probably won't generate a nice tight oil seal, and you'll simply have to take everything apart before too long and replace them.

Jun 02, 2011 | 2005 Honda CB 250 Nighthawk

1 Answer

Handlebar adjustment....


A lot of guys will just find a firm surface (tree, pole) and beat the wheel against it to straighten the front wheel. Some will kick the wheel to straighten the front end. I would not suggest either method unless you are in the middle of a race.

The best way is to loosen the top triple clamp bolts (that grip the fork tubes) and then grip the tire with your knees (standing in front of the bike) and twist the bars, then re-tighten the top clamp bolts once you are happy with the alignment. It will move quite easily. Check the tighness of the steering stem nut after you are done.

If you need any additional details, don't hesistate to ask.

Jul 08, 2010 | 2004 Suzuki DR 200 SE

1 Answer

2001 Honda 929rr. The front end is out of alignment


set the bike so the front end is off the ground a little then loosen all bolts on the triple clamp that hold the fork tubes then with the front tire held between your knees turn the bars until aligned then retighten clamps.

Mar 01, 2010 | 2001 Honda CBR 929 RR Fireblade

1 Answer

I crashed and need to straighten the steering. The front wheel is turning to the left. How do I re-align the handlebars and front wheel?


First, support the bike so that the front wheel is off the ground. Then, loosen (do not remove, just loosen them) the bolts that clamp the fork tubes into the upper and lower triple clamp braces. Loosen the front axle attachments to the fork legs. Now stand in front of the bike and hold the front wheel between your knees and turn the handlebars until they are straight - and re-tighten everything. Also, check the large nut on top of the steering stem, making sure it is tight.

Dec 11, 2009 | 2004 Yamaha YZ 250

1 Answer

1997 BMW R1100R - front tyre scuffing rhs. This is on a bike I may buy. The tyre is well worn and will need to be replaced. I am concerned that the suspension may be out of alignment . What should I have...


The tyre could be worn like that simply because the previous owner liked right hand corners more than left or his common journey had more right hand bends.

But it could be a sign of something more serious.

It could be that the frame is bent at the steering head.(Or the swing arm is bent or swing arm bearings/bushes worn out)

A wheel alignment test should verify this.

It could also be a front suspension fault i.e. un-even adjustment of suspension settings (if it is adjustable) or incorrect fluid levels in the forks, or a bent fork tube
.
To check the steering head raise the front wheel up off the ground, grab the forks and pull back and forth. If you can feel movement then they are not adjusted properly.
Now turn the steering from side to side. The movement should be smooth and not notchy.
If any of these symptoms are apparent then the steering head bearings need adjusting/replacing.

To check the the swing arm bearings/bushes raise the rear wheel off the ground.
Grab the rear wheel and try to move it from side to side.
If there is movement the bearings/bushes are worn out.

To check the wheel alignment,place the bike on a level flat surface,loop a long piece of (thin) string around the back tyre(at about the 5 or six o'clock position viewed from the left).
so you have two pieces of equal length, long enough to reach past the front wheel.

Now pull the strings to the front of the bike.

Now position the front wheel straight ahead.

Now kneeling(or sitting on the floor at the front of the bike), place a string in each hand.

Now looking to the back wheel move the strings together until the string just touches the front edge of the rear tyre on each side.

Now holding that position, check the distance between the string and the edges of the front tyre to see they are equal.
If the gap is not even the bike has a twist,bend,missalignment somewhere.

If this seems a bit difficult you could try taking it to your local dealer where they can check it for you.

An experienced mechanic can perform these checks pretty quickly.

It usually takes me about half an hour maximum.

I hope that you find this information helpful
regards Andrew porrelli

Dec 09, 2009 | 1998 BMW R 1100 R

2 Answers

Can i straighten the front forks up if I loosen the nut on the headstock, move the fork legs, and retighten the nut again? the bike is a VL800 k5.


Loosen the front fender, the axle retaining bolts, plus the upper and lower headstock bolts and nuts so that the whole assembly is free to align. Tighten the fender last. If that doesn't restore wheel alignment, you may have bent tubes that need straightening or replacement. Was the bike in a front-end wreck?

Nov 15, 2009 | 2005 Suzuki Boulevard C50

1 Answer

Front tire is pointing to the right


You need to assess to what level is the fork bent,if the metal on the chrome of fork is twisted then you need a new one else you will have to remove the forks completely,remove the tyre and get one of the fork tube out and go to machine shop they can use a hydrolic press to straighten it.And there you go!!Forks is back on..Please note you have to align the forks by twisting the steering..

Jun 16, 2009 | 1996 Honda XR 600 R

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