Question about 1995 Suzuki GSX 600 F (Katana)

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Starting troubles i have a 2000 600 suzuki katana that i believe the timing on the cams is set on the exhaust stroke instead of the compression sroke can you tell me how to set the cam timing

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  • rk_205 Dec 12, 2008

    well i know the engine was rebuilt but i am not sure how or who did it i bought the engine off e-bay for 250 and it has been balanced and blue printed and thanks for your input i will try this this evening and i will let you know how it turns out

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Did you over haul the engine? If so please tell me how you set the cam timing. Did you install the int cam first? and there is a sequence for installing the cams. You need to make sure that at TDC on #1 cly both lobes of the int and exh cams are pointed down. There are dots on the cam gears that will line up parallel with the head when the cams are installed correctly.

Posted on Dec 12, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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1 Answer

Can a cam gear be 180 degrees off at TDC on the compression stroke?


No. The crank will turn two revolutions to each full revolution of the cam.

Jan 15, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a oz xe 4.1 lt 250 xflow motor which i have rebuilt and put flat top pistons in bored out 60 thou shaved yella terra head 15 thou and has a very mild cam after lining up timing marks the inlet


when setting up the valve timing it is always done on the exhaust stoke.. Place the piston on TDC and set the valve timing so that the exhaust valve is just closing and the inlet is just opening. Rocking the crank a bit before tdc to a bit after tdc will produce a movement where the exhaust starts to close as the inlet starts to open. This is known as valve rock or valve overlap. The cam modification is of no consequence as the as all that is modified is the valve duration , not when they open or close. With the cam now timed to the crank turn the crank 180 degrees and set the ignition timing to the degrees advanced recommended ( 10-12 degrees bftdc is recommended for starting). Place the HT leads in the correct firing order and when running use a timing light to adjust ignition timing. If you are fitting a new cam then you must bedding in grease and when the motor starts it has to be run at around 2.000rpms for around 10 minutes to set (harden) the cam lobes or else they will wear off very quickly.

Sep 28, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I would like to know the position of the cam lobes when tdc on a Suzuki dr 500


There are two TDC's, TDC of the compression stroke, both cam lobes will be up, away from the valves. On TDC of the exhaust stroke, the exhaust lobe will be just past the exhaust valve, and the intake lobe will just be ready to open the intake valve. See, as the piston rises on the exhaust stroke, the exhaust valve is open. When piston reaches TDC, the exhaust will close, and the intake will be opening as the piston begins downward again. Coming up on the compression stroke, and on up to TDC, both valves remain closed-lobes are away from valves.

Nov 28, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

98 cabrio 2.0 trying to find top dead center.have compression on both revolutions of cam


Of the cam? Is that a typo, because you want to be thinking the crankshaft. The crank turns two revolutions for every single revolution of the cam, the compression stroke and the exhaust stroke. You want to find TDC of the compression stroke. Unless your timing is really messed up, you should have NO compression on the exhaust stroke. The exhaust valve should be open as the piston comes up to TDC on the exhaust stroke. On the compression stroke as the piston starts to rise, a finger over the spark plug hole, you should feel a bit of pressure, and then just turn the crank on around to the zero mark-TDC. Now your cam sprocket should be on the mark, if timing is correct.
Good luck. I have a minor emergency, have to leave, but if you post back needing any more help or questions, I can answer in about 6-8 hrs. Lots of top-notch experts on here-some excellent mechanics. I'm just an old shade tree mech, so I don't get a lot of feedback-hint, hint. lol

Aug 02, 2013 | Volkswagen Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Step by step instructions on timing belt installation 2000 hyundai accent


Right, so you have two TDC's-the exhaust stroke and the compression stroke Top Dead Center-and both occurr when the crank hits the zero mark on the timing scale.
Always set timing with the number one cylinder at TDC on the compression stroke. How do you know which is which? If you have a distributor, the rotor will be pointing to number one cylinder tower, when at TDC of the compression stroke. If you are on the exhaust stroke's TDC, the rotor will be pointing just opposite of number one .
If you don't have a distributor, look at the valves for cylinder one under the valve cover. If at TDC of compression stroke, both valves will be closed. At TDC of exhaust stroke, the exhaust valve will be open.
You can also find the compression stroke on number one by pulling out the spark plug for number one, and either put a wrench or socket on the crank pulley and turn it clockwise, or use the starter and bump the engine over in short bumps. Put your finger or thumb over the spark plug hole and feel for the pressure to build up. As soon as you feel pressure on your finger, (if turning by hand, pressure will be slight, but you can feel it) you are on the compression stroke. Stop bumping the starter and turn the crank on around by hand until the zero mark lines up on the timing scale-TDC of compression stroke! The exhaust stroke will have no pressure build-up as the piston comes to top-because the exhaust valve is open. On the compression stroke, both valves are closed as the piston travels up the cylinder.

Dec 07, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1971 ducati 350 scrambler how do u set the timeing


Set the piston to TDC (top dead center) this is the higest point the piston will rise before moving on to the down stroke, either by lining up the marks on the crank rotor or a long screw driver (large handle so it wont fall in) down the plug hole and watch for the highest point lock or hold at this point. The cams should be fitted next on the 'compression' stroke meaing the all valves should be closed when the cams are seated (no valves being pressed by cams) generally at this point the cam lobs face away from the valves, next stroke down (ignition of fuel) valves should be closed with the exhaust cam moving round ready to rock on to the exhaust valve as the piston rises to the top again (4th stroke exhaust) as the exhaust valve lobe rocks off the intake cam lobe should be starting to rock on opening the intake valve on the down stroke of the pistion.
Trun the engine over by hand to make sure no valves are knocking the piston.
Should be as follows
1. all valve clearance free/rocking at ' TDC 1st 'down' stroke (ignition of fuel) valves closed exhaust moving round but not pressing valve ,
2. 2nd stroke 'up' exhaust valve rocking open and closing as piston tops with the intake ready to rock on as the exhaust closes and piston tops (exhaust),
3.3rd stroke 'down' (intake of fuel) as the piston moves down the intake valve should be opening.
4. 4th stroke 'up' compression of fuel all valves rocking closed as the piston rises for the compression stroke back to TDC all valves closed/rocking free.

Intake, compression , ignition and exhaust. (**** squeeze bang blow)

Feb 23, 2012 | 1972 Ducati 350 Scrambler

1 Answer

How do i set the timing on a yz450


Set the piston to TDC (top dead center) this is the higest point the piston will rise before moving on to the down stroke, either by lining up the marks on the crank rotor or a long screw driver (large handle so it wont fall in) down the plug hole and watch for the highest point lock or hold at this point. If cam sprocket has marks line them with the cylinder head surface (sometimes the sprocket bolts) parallel.
The cams should be fitted next on the 'compression' stroke meaing the all valves should be closed when the cams are seated (no valves being pressed by cams) generally at this point the cam lobs face away from the valves , next stroke down (ignition of fuel) valves should be closed with the exhaust cam moving round ready to rock on to the exhaust valve as the piston rises to the top again (4th stroke exhaust) as the exhaust valve lobe rocks off the intake cam lobe should be starting to rock on opening the intake valve on the down stroke of the pistion.
Trun the engine over by hand to make sure no valves are knocking the piston.
Should be as follows
1. all valve clearance free/rocking at ' TDC 1st 'down' stroke (ignition of fuel) valves closed exhaust moving round but not pressing valve ,
2. 2nd stroke 'up' exhaust valve rocking open and closing as piston tops with the intake ready to rock on as the exhaust closes and piston tops (exhaust),
3.3rd stroke 'down' (intake of fuel) as the piston moves down the intake valve should be opening.
4. 4th stroke 'up' compression of fuel all valves rocking closed as the piston rises for the compression stroke back to TDC all valves closed/rocking free.

Intake, compression , ignition and exhaust. (**** squeeze bang blow)

Feb 22, 2012 | Yamaha Motorcycles

3 Answers

2004 ttr-125 bike won't start period. installed new vavles because the exhaust valve was bent, cleaned the carb and timed the cam and piston to TDC. i have the exhaust pipe off so i can hear the valve...


after trying to start the bike, remove spark plug, is it wet or dry? dry means carb problem, wet ignition problem.gtting firm till half stroke is normal, as compression is increasing. also make sure you didnt set the cam on wrong stroke, like exhaust instead of compression.

Sep 04, 2009 | 2004 Yamaha TT-R 125 L

1 Answer

Timing will not set when i set tdc


Timing could be 180 deg out meaning your trying to fire on the exhaust stroke instead of the ignition stroke? cheack that your cam timing is right if you have had the timing belt off ? reset to top dead center then make sure you are on the right stroke

Aug 02, 2009 | 1990 Toyota 4Runner

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