Question about 2005 Harley Davidson FLSTSC - FLSTSCI Softail Springer Classic

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Changebattery how to get saddle seat off?

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If it has a single seat or a double seat ,it should have a bolt at the back .Remove it and the seat should slide up and back revealing the battery.

Posted on Dec 03, 2008

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I need a seat for a Nel Lusso can I buy it separately?


most bicycles have saddles with standard ~1/4" diameter rails that can be interchanged on any bike. Caveat emptor: I do remember seeing some Huffy bikes back in the '80's and '90's that had flat vertical blade like rails that were only used by Huffy. If that is the case you can always get a new seat post (make sure you get the right diameter to fit in the seat tube, it's stamped on the seat post near the bottom) and a new saddle that will work with the seat post. Any local bike shop can help you get the right size and fit that you need. ($15+ for a seat post, $30+ for a saddle).

Oct 18, 2015 | Huffy Cycling

1 Answer

Can't find a seat that doesn't cause soft tissue tears or bony areas hurt


The body position on a tri bike is cruicial not only for aerodynamics, but for comfort as well. The saddle is the usual "sore" spot for most riders who try to find a more aero tuck. Unfortunately, there is no magic saddle that takes care of everyone's problems. Human physiology differs from person to person and saddles need to fit a wide range of riders. My advice would to try to find a bicycle shop with a saddle rental program, this will allow you to test ride a saddle before purchasing one. Also, do some research on the various saddles out there. I had to try six different saddles before settling on one that is perfect. Here are some links to saddle manufacturers:
Triathlon Bike Saddle For Men amp Women Koobi PRS TRI T1 Welcome Innovative SaddleMaker Products

Mar 27, 2014 | Cycling

2 Answers

Move saddle forward


Undo the fixing bolts and the saddle will slide forward
Make sure to tighten it up

Mar 04, 2013 | Cannondale Cycling

1 Answer

How bike size is measured?


So what does "different frame size" actually mean? And what does that frame size number, 13" or 25" or whatever, mean? It's fairly simple.

The frame size number comes from the length of the seat tube. The seat tube is that nearly vertical tube of the three big tubes that make up the "main triangle" of the bike frame. The seat tube has the bike's saddle attached at the top, and has the pedals and crank arms attached at the bottom. A short seat tube will make the pedals closer to the saddle; a long seat tube will make the pedals further away. The frame size number is the length from the center of the crank arm spindle (the axle that holds the two crank arms together) up to the top of the seat tube (where the saddle and seatpost are attached). On some bikes this is measured in inches, on others in centimeters.

But that's not the only dimension that changes for different frame sizes. As bicycle frames get taller, they also get longer. That means the distance from the saddle to the handlebars gets longer. This makes sense, since tall people don't just have longer legs than short people. They usually also have longer arms, a longer torso, and so on. So the bike frame also needs to get longer in every direction for a taller rider, not just longer from pedal to saddle. The top tube gets longer, which pushes the handlebars further away from the saddle. The head tube (the frame part that the fork attaches to) gets taller, so the handlebars will be higher up. All of these dimensions and more are fine tuned in every frame size, so the right size frame for a person's height fits well everywhere, not just in the saddle.

Dec 21, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

How size is measured? So what does “different frame size” actually mean? And what does that frame size number, 13” or 25” or whatever, mean?


The frame size number comes from the length of the seat tube. The seat tube is that nearly vertical tube of the three big tubes that make up the "main triangle" of the bike frame. The seat tube has the bike's saddle attached at the top, and has the pedals and crank arms attached at the bottom. A short seat tube will make the pedals closer to the saddle; a long seat tube will make the pedals further away. The frame size number is the length from the center of the crank arm spindle (the axle that holds the two crank arms together) up to the top of the seat tube (where the saddle and seatpost are attached). On some bikes this is measured in inches, on others in centimeters.

But that's not the only dimension that changes for different frame sizes. As bicycle frames get taller, they also get longer. That means the distance from the saddle to the handlebars gets longer. This makes sense, since tall people don't just have longer legs than short people. They usually also have longer arms, a longer torso, and so on. So the bike frame also needs to get longer in every direction for a taller rider, not just longer from pedal to saddle. The top tube gets longer, which pushes the handlebars further away from the saddle. The head tube (the frame part that the fork attaches to) gets taller, so the handlebars will be higher up. All of these dimensions and more are fine tuned in every frame size, so the right size frame for a person's height fits well everywhere, not just in the saddle.

Dec 16, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

Install saddle bags


A bolt is underneth the driver seat at rear. Hard to see. Maybe pull off driver seat first the rear seat - be sure you are using a soft saddlebag
support. Don't get bags caught in wheel

Oct 07, 2009 | 1992 Suzuki LS 650 Savage

1 Answer

I bought a new seat for my 1996 Fuji Sagres. The old saddle clamp is too narrow for the new seat rails. Where can I buy a different sized saddle clamp that will fit my bike?


take it to a bike shop and get a new seatpost. bike shops
have manuals that they can check to find a seat post that
fits the bike frame and has the proper size rails to fit your
new saddle.
this is a good time to upgrade the seatpost, you can get one
that is lighter and more adjustable that your old one.

Jun 06, 2009 | Cycling

2 Answers

Seat removal


The strap that goes around the seat bolts to the fender under the fender it's self or to the sides near the front of the fender struts or behind the saddle bags if you have them.
They are usually held on by either an allen bolt or a capped hex bolt.
If it is attached under the seat it is held by 1 bolt through both ends to 1 hole.

Dec 27, 2008 | 2008 Harley Davidson FLHX Street Glide

2 Answers

Raise the seat


First take off the seat, turn it upside down, unscrew the two screws and two bolts that hold the two parts of the seat together. Separate the pillion and rider seat (takes a bit of wiggling), now you can concentrate on the riders seat. undo the four screw that hold all the rubber gromets down (make a note of the direction they are facing), and unbolt the two small bolts on the front. The seat should now come apart, move the bracket at the back of the seat down a hole. Re-attach the two halfs of the seat at the front but this time one hole up. You should see a gap between the two halfs. Put the rubber gromets back on, this is where I went wrong the first time, TURN THE FRONT TWO 180 degrees and leave the back ones how they are. Screw everything back together and you have one raised seat my long legged friend.

Nov 10, 2008 | 1997 Suzuki GSF 250 Bandit

2 Answers

How to adjust saddle postions


you can loosen the bolt under the saddle, and adjust it...

for me, the best saddle position for long distance is when it's facing downwards a little bit, so that you can move your legs freely.

Oct 29, 2008 | Bravo Sports /Bike Access 1001782 Racing...

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