Question about 2004 Honda Fusion Type X

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Chain I checked the chain slack on my bike yesterday after cleaning and lubing. It was a little loose. I decided to check the chain after rotating it a bit and found that it went from out of spec loose to out of spec tight. My first guess is my chain is old and needs replacement, but how likely is it that something else is causing the chain to tighten as it rotates? I don't think I could have bent the output shaft on my motor, but perhaps a sprocket is out of round? Any recommendations for a chain or sprockets for my bike?

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You need a new chain & most likely sprockets. Motorcycle chains don't stretch evenly.

Posted on Nov 20, 2008

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1 Answer

Chain adjustment


Just a guess, but beings you didn't give YEAR/MAKE/MODEL, that's all I can do.

IF it's the rear drive chain you're talking about (as opposed to the primary chain), get rear wheel off the ground.
With bike in neutral, rotate rear wheel until you find the tightest spot of the chain in the middle between the rear sprocket and the transmission sprocket.
Loosen axle nut, adjust rear axle adjusters evenly until slack is within spec.
Rotate rear wheel in normal direction of travel and see that chain is tracking true on sprocket. If not,adjust as needed with axle adjusters.
IF mechanical rear brake (instead of hydraulic rear brake), adjust brake.

Oct 16, 2013 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

My bike looses power in high gears


I don,t think the chain could cause this , try lubing the chain with oil and taking it for a ride see if that makes a difference , when was your fuel filter last changed or your air filter cleaned or changed.

Apr 12, 2013 | 1995 Suzuki GSX 600 F (Katana)

2 Answers

Chain noise


Excessive drive chain noise is caused by the following, lack of proper maintenance, keep it clean and lubed, next would be correct adjustment, most bikes about 3/4" deflection at center run of chain up and down play, next would be a worn out chain and/or drive or driven sprockets, last but not least and very noisy is the chain being stretched, if you rotate the wheel the chain gets loose then tight. Always check the sprockets for excess wear when replacing a chain, the drive sprocket on the engine is hardened steel and wears the least.

Feb 09, 2012 | Bajaj Pulsar 180 Motorcycles

1 Answer

I need to tighten my chain on my fzr 1000,its a 1987


The first step is to find the tightest part of the chain. Unless it's a brand new chain it will have a tight spot somewhere on it. It's easiest to do this with the bike on a race stand if you have it. Rotate the wheel and observe the lower part of the chain and watch it lift up when you hit tight spots. The spot where the chain lifts highest is the tightest part of the chain. Once you have found this spot, grab the chain on the low side under the swingarm and move it up and down. It should move up and down around 30-35mm or so, or an inch and a bit if you're an imperialist :) If the chain moves more or less than this then it needs to be adjusted.

To adjust the chain, you need to loosen the axle first. Don't take the nut off but it has to be loose enough to undo by hand. Using 2 spanners, unlock the lock nuts on the end of the swingarm and wind the nut in or out until you get the correct amount of chain slack. always do the sprocket side (left side) first, then repeat the same on the other side. Check the chain adjuster marks to make sure that the adjusters are equal on both sides, this will make sure your rear wheel is aligned properly.

Once you have adjusted the chain, tighten the rear axle and check again. The chain slack will change slightly after you tighten the axle, it might go tighter, it might go looser. Depends on the bike. But the chain slack must be correct with the axle tightened. A bit of practise here and you will be able to guess the correct amount before tightening the rear axle.

Once you have the slack set correctly and the axle is tight, make sure to tighten the adjusters. Tighten the front nut first against the swingarm plate so it can't move. Do it tight but not crazy tight. Then holding the first nut so it can't move tighten the locknut against the first nut. Repeat this on both sides.

If you are not quite sure if the chain is right, always err on the side of making it too loose rather than too tight. Running your chain too tight can destroy your output shaft bearing. It's only about $30 or so for a new one but your engine needs to be completely stripped down to replace it, it's not a fun job. I have seen a lot of FZs and FZRs have this problem because people ran chains too tight. If your chain really is too loose then it will start making your gear changes harder to do, that's the sign you need to tighten it.

Feb 14, 2011 | 1987 Yamaha FZR 1000

2 Answers

Chane slack


Slacken the wheel nut a couple of turns ,then simply adjust tension with the chain adjusters at the rear of the swingarm legs. Look carefully you will see notches marked on both sides of the swingarm by the wheel spindle these must be the same on both sides, your manual will tell you the chain slack for your bike.probably about 25-35mm put a ruler up to the chain and using finger pressure push up on the chain ,this is the chain slack. Once done tighten the wheel nut up to correct torque setting.( manual or call local dealer),then replace split pin with new through the wheel nut. Double check all your work no loose nuts,then sit on the bike get a friend to wiggle the chain there should be small slack as first meashured 25-35mm again, if not re-try,once experienced you will do it first time.

Mar 04, 2010 | 2000 Honda VFR 800

2 Answers

How to tighten a loose chain


To tighten a loose chain you need to pull the cotter key pin from the rear axle then loosen but do not remove the nut. It just has to be loose enough to slide in the swingarm. At this point there are tension adjusters on the ends of the swing arm you tighten them to take the slack out of the chain. NOT TO TIGHT! You should have 1 inch of play in the chain this is up down play not front to back. I push the chain up the highest it can go and measure how far it falls. NOTE: TURN THE TENSION ADJUSTERS THE SAME AMOUNT THE SAME DIRECTION IF THE AXLE IS TWISTED YOU WILL THROW THE CHAIN. This can make for a bad six months!

Aug 19, 2009 | 1998 Suzuki VZ 800 Marauder

2 Answers

Chain


The answer depends on whether external chain lubrication is beneficial for a chain with internal grease sealed with o-rings and perhaps how often you clean your chain. One school-of-thought believes that no additional lubrication is needed. The other believes that the sprocket and chain surfaces that do not have permanent grease also need to be lubricated. The chain manufacturers tell us that also lubricating the chain and sprocket surfaces will extend the life of these components. But a chain lube will sling-off unless designed to stick to the chain so it needs to stay tacky. Consequently it will also attract grit and road debris that, in turn, will accelerate wear faster than if you just have a clean unlubricated chain. Chain lube will also reduce power losses due to friction and shed water that leads to rust (and wear). If you live in a wet climate, you should probably use chain lube to prevent rust. A chain newly-cleaned with WD-40 will have a coat of light oil that will effectively displace water and reduce surface corrosion of the links. It's a low viscosity oil so any excess will sling off easily, but will attract very little grit - much less that any chain lube - and it will have the same rolling friction as a number of chain lubes on the market. WD-40, used as a one-step cleaner and lubricant is sufficient. Because it is a light oil, some fling-off will occur, so any excess should be wiped-off. USED REGULARLY, it provides good corrosion protection, low (but not the lowest) rolling resistance, and attracts less road grit than waxy chain lubes. So your chain stays very clean. If you aren't inclined to clean and lube your chain regularly, or often ride in wet conditions that promote corrosion, there are chain lubes on the market that are designed to stick to your chain to resist fling-off and provide longer-lasting corrosion protection. Some remain tacky and attract grit, some stay slippery to the touch. All of them need to cleaned off and renewed at some point. If you’ve decided to use chain lube after cleaning your chain, then it’s best to use straight kerosene as your cleaner because the light oil that WD-40 contains will make it difficult for the chain lube to stay attached without flinging-off.,,,

Nov 10, 2008 | 1977 Ducati 860 GTS

1 Answer

Maintenance


I know this is a maintenance question but I'm looking for a little local information. I went to clean my chain yesterday and noticed that it's way too long. There's a bit of kinking too so it's time to get a new chain. The chain maintenance info on this board seems pretty detailed and doesn't look too hard (lol perhaps I should mention that I'm a noobie and haven't worked on my bike much yet). Should I attempt this on my own? Any suggestions where in TO I should get the chain and tools? Or should I take the bike to Rev Cycle (any rough estimates on price)?,Depending on your skill and comfort level you can probably tackle this job OK, here are some rules (I'm making up early Saturday morning without the benefit of coffee) Buy the best quality chain you can buy, (x or o ring) If the chain is screwed chances are your sprockets are too (yeah I know $$$) It's a good time to go up in the rear or down in the front (sprocket teeth, don't do both) if your bike has a single swing arm forget it (tools stands etc too much hassle adjusting probably not worth it just take it too the dealer unless your very determined and are investing in the tools and time etc) otherwise no biggee. Now so your chain lasts don't over adjust, unsprung the chain will appear loose get some else to sit on the bike as you check the chain tension all the way through the suspension travel check chain and sprocket alignment (laser, eye ball whatever) sometimes shims or other pieces go missing (especially when chain have kinks or wear prematurely) chain wax is your friend, lube it hot and use a clean rag to get excess and clean sprockets.,,,

Nov 10, 2008 | 2002 Ducati 750 Sport

1 Answer

Maintenance


I know this is a maintenance question but I'm looking for a little local information. I went to clean my chain yesterday and noticed that it's way too long. There's a bit of kinking too so it's time to get a new chain. The chain maintenance info on this board seems pretty detailed and doesn't look too hard (lol perhaps I should mention that I'm a noobie and haven't worked on my bike much yet). Should I attempt this on my own? Any suggestions where in TO I should get the chain and tools? Or should I take the bike to Rev Cycle (any rough estimates on price)?,Depending on your skill and comfort level you can probably tackle this job OK, here are some rules (I'm making up early Saturday morning without the benefit of coffee) Buy the best quality chain you can buy, (x or o ring) If the chain is screwed chances are your sprockets are too (yeah I know $$$) It's a good time to go up in the rear or down in the front (sprocket teeth, don't do both) if your bike has a single swing arm forget it (tools stands etc too much hassle adjusting probably not worth it just take it too the dealer unless your very determined and are investing in the tools and time etc) otherwise no biggee. Now so your chain lasts don't over adjust, unsprung the chain will appear loose get some else to sit on the bike as you check the chain tension all the way through the suspension travel check chain and sprocket alignment (laser, eye ball whatever) sometimes shims or other pieces go missing (especially when chain have kinks or wear prematurely) chain wax is your friend, lube it hot and use a clean rag to get excess and clean sprockets.,,,

Nov 10, 2008 | 2001 Ducati 750 S i.e. N-C

1 Answer

Maintenance


I know this is a maintenance question but I'm looking for a little local information. I went to clean my chain yesterday and noticed that it's way too long. There's a bit of kinking too so it's time to get a new chain. The chain maintenance info on this board seems pretty detailed and doesn't look too hard (lol perhaps I should mention that I'm a noobie and haven't worked on my bike much yet). Should I attempt this on my own? Any suggestions where in TO I should get the chain and tools? Or should I take the bike to Rev Cycle (any rough estimates on price)?,Depending on your skill and comfort level you can probably tackle this job OK, here are some rules (I'm making up early Saturday morning without the benefit of coffee) Buy the best quality chain you can buy, (x or o ring) If the chain is screwed chances are your sprockets are too (yeah I know $$$) It's a good time to go up in the rear or down in the front (sprocket teeth, don't do both) if your bike has a single swing arm forget it (tools stands etc too much hassle adjusting probably not worth it just take it too the dealer unless your very determined and are investing in the tools and time etc) otherwise no biggee. Now so your chain lasts don't over adjust, unsprung the chain will appear loose get some else to sit on the bike as you check the chain tension all the way through the suspension travel check chain and sprocket alignment (laser, eye ball whatever) sometimes shims or other pieces go missing (especially when chain have kinks or wear prematurely) chain wax is your friend, lube it hot and use a clean rag to get excess and clean sprockets.,,,

Nov 10, 2008 | 1985 Ducati 750 F1

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