Question about 2004 Honda FTR

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Bumping Previous owner put on a new front tire. I get pretty severe bumping through the handlebars. Changed the fork oil with no improvement. The bike sat for at least 6 months before I bought it. Theories on what's causing the bumping? Could it be a flat spot? Anyone know how to check?

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Tubed tire, right? COULD be a flat spot but my gut tells me the tire isn't mounted correctly. My guess is that if you look at the sidewall of the tire next to the rim on one side or the other, you'll notice that the rubber edge that sits just outside the rim isn't consistent around the entire rim because they didn't seat the bead properly. Typically all you have to do is let some air out and resituate the tire on the rim a little and keep an eye on it as you inflate it. You can overinflate the tire to around 50 to 60 PSI to help it seat correctly on the rim but be sure to reduce the air pressure--you don't want to leave it like that. The other thing it could be if it's doing this at high speeds only is that the wheel is severely out of balance, in which case you would need to take the wheel off the bike and balance it, but my gut still says it's the way the tire was installed on the bike. For those of you looking for the procedure for changing a tire and/or balancing a wheel, this is a pretty good step-by-step guide: http://www.clarity.net/~adam/tire-changing-doc.html

Posted on Nov 20, 2008

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Go to the site below where you can see a parts diagram for your specific bike. You will select the actual brand, year, model, etc., once you go to the site. Part numbers and prices are also shown. You can order parts from this site. In the event no price is shown on a particular part, the part is not in stock.
www.babbittsonline.com/pages/parts/viewbybrandand/parts.aspx

Please rate this solution. Thanks!

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