Question about 1974 kawasaki Z1A

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Multimeter i get confused about how to properly use a multimeter. can someone describe in baby talk how, i could test: 1. solenoid 2. coils

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Pick up a shop manual. It will tell you how and what to check for coils. I don't know the specs off hand for your coils (they are generally in ohms which measure resistance) or which wire to connect to the multimeter where. You need a shop manual to test coils to get the specs on how many ohms there should be. Make sure the battery is 100% charged and read the manual for your multimeter. You can pop the fuse if you use it wrong and or damage the meter. To test a solinoid you'll need a helper or you can do it yourself but it helps to have someone push the start button for you while you watch the meter. Put the multimeter in DC volts (I believe there is postition of 20v and under but dont use millivolts, I dont have mine handy to look at and my memory sucks anymore). Have the helper push the start button and put the + lead on one terminal (the one coming from the battery) and the - on the other (the heavy one leading to the starter) it should show a voltage (around 12 or more with a fully charged battery)when the button is pushed with the key on. To see if you are getting power tot he solenoid unhook the wire coming from the start button (again this is where a shop manual helps but it's usually a real thin wire) place the + lead on the wire and the - lead on a ground ( engine, frame, - battery term). have a helper push the start button with the key on. If you have voltage to that wire thats close to battery voltage then you are getting power to the solenoid most likely. You can also test that way with a test light. I know I'm forgetting stuff but you get the idea. Oh yeah, check all your fuses first to make sure none of them are blown.

Posted on Nov 20, 2008

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What would cause my battery to keep being drained on my yy250t


Hi, Terry perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12.5 volts or better after charging.
3. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check the battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
4. Hook up battery positive cable, then with your multimeter on the milliamp scale connect one lead to the negative battery post and the other lead to the ground cable. Meter should read 3 milliamps or less, 10 milliamps with a radio, 15 milliamps with radio and CB. If your multimeter reads higher you need to isolate the circuit by pulling fuses and circuit breakers one at a time and observe multimeter for a drop in amperage then get out your test light and track down the short in that circuit.
5. Hook up the multimeter to the battery set it to DC volts and start the engine if multimeter falls below 9.0 volts while cranking you need to perform a proper load test on the battery and replace if necessary.
6. With the engine running at 3600 RPM, the battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
7. Unplug the voltage regulator from the alternator at crankcase by the front of the primary cover.
8. To test voltage regulator go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
9. With the multimeter set to the ohms scale, with one lead grounded, touch an alternator pin ohmmeter should read infinity, if not replace the stator.
10. With both leads touching alternator pins multimeter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace the stator.
11. With the multimeter set on AC volts scale, both leads touching alternator pins multimeter should read 16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace the rotor.
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Hi Anonymous perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12.5 volts or better after charging.
3. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check the battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
4. Hook up battery positive cable, then with your multimeter on the milliamp scale connect one lead to the negative battery post and the other lead to the ground cable. Meter should read 3 milliamps or less, 10 milliamps with a radio, 15 milliamps with radio and CB. If your multimeter reads higher you need to isolate the circuit by pulling fuses and circuit breakers one at a time and observe multimeter for a drop in amperage then get out your test light and track down the short in that circuit.
5. Hook up the multimeter to the battery set it to DC volts and start the engine if multimeter falls below 9.0 volts while cranking you need to perform a proper load test on the battery and replace if necessary.
6. With the engine running at 3600 RPM, the battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
7. Unplug the voltage regulator from the alternator at crankcase by the front of the primary cover.
8. To test voltage regulator go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
9. With the multimeter set to the ohms scale, with one lead grounded, touch an alternator pin ohmmeter should read infinity, if not replace the stator.
10. With both leads touching alternator pins multimeter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace the stator.
11. With the multimeter set on AC volts scale, both leads touching alternator pins multimeter should read 16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace the rotor.
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1 Answer

Battery dead over night


Hi Anonymous perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12.5 volts or better after charging.
3. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check the battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
4. Hook up battery positive cable, then with your multimeter on the milliamp scale connect one lead to the negative battery post and the other lead to the ground cable. Meter should read 3 milliamps or less, 10 milliamps with a radio, 15 milliamps with radio and CB. If your multimeter reads higher you need to isolate the circuit by pulling fuses and circuit breakers one at a time and observe multimeter for a drop in amperage then get out your test light and track down the short in that circuit.
5. Hook up the multimeter to the battery set it to DC volts and start the engine if multimeter falls below 9.0 volts while cranking you need to perform a proper load test on the battery and replace if necessary.
6. With the engine running at 3600 RPM, the battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
7. Unplug the voltage regulator from the alternator at crankcase by the front of the primary cover.
8. To test voltage regulator go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
9. With the multimeter set to the ohms scale, with one lead grounded, touch an alternator pin ohmmeter should read infinity, if not replace the stator.
10. With both leads touching alternator pins multimeter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace the stator.
11. With the multimeter set on AC volts scale, both leads touching alternator pins multimeter should read 16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace the rotor.
For more information about your issue please visit the websites below. Good luck and have a nice day.
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1 Answer

My Suzuki GS 550 L wont start


check the cdi box i think thats your problem if so buy a dyna s 3 for it works great on mine

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1 Answer

Put new engine in carnt get a spark at plug sym jet 50cc euro 2004 model


There may be several things causing this fault (your sure the plug is fine?)

The ignition systems on these bikes are pretty basic. The Stator plate provides power to the CDI unit, which builds up until the pulser tells it to send the power to the coil and produce the spark

1. is there voltage from the stator plate (under flywheel) - you can test with a basic multimeter.

2. is the pulser sending a pulse - also can be tested with basic multimeter

3. is the CDI blown? - swap out to test

4. Is the Coil blown? - can be tested with multimeter

it is also very possible that you may have got a couple of wires mixed up when you switched engines.

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3 Answers

Multimeter


Pick up a shop manual. It will tell you how and what to check for coils. I don't know the specs off hand for your coils (they are generally in ohms which measure resistance) or which wire to connect to the multimeter where. You need a shop manual to test coils to get the specs on how many ohms there should be. Make sure the battery is 100% charged and read the manual for your multimeter. You can pop the fuse if you use it wrong and or damage the meter. To test a solinoid you'll need a helper or you can do it yourself but it helps to have someone push the start button for you while you watch the meter. Put the multimeter in DC volts (I believe there is postition of 20v and under but dont use millivolts, I dont have mine handy to look at and my memory sucks anymore). Have the helper push the start button and put the + lead on one terminal (the one coming from the battery) and the - on the other (the heavy one leading to the starter) it should show a voltage (around 12 or more with a fully charged battery)when the button is pushed with the key on. To see if you are getting power tot he solenoid unhook the wire coming from the start button (again this is where a shop manual helps but it's usually a real thin wire) place the + lead on the wire and the - lead on a ground ( engine, frame, - battery term). have a helper push the start button with the key on. If you have voltage to that wire thats close to battery voltage then you are getting power to the solenoid most likely. You can also test that way with a test light. I know I'm forgetting stuff but you get the idea. Oh yeah, check all your fuses first to make sure none of them are blown.

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1 Answer

Multimeter


Pick up a shop manual. It will tell you how and what to check for coils. I don't know the specs off hand for your coils (they are generally in ohms which measure resistance) or which wire to connect to the multimeter where. You need a shop manual to test coils to get the specs on how many ohms there should be. Make sure the battery is 100% charged and read the manual for your multimeter. You can pop the fuse if you use it wrong and or damage the meter. To test a solinoid you'll need a helper or you can do it yourself but it helps to have someone push the start button for you while you watch the meter. Put the multimeter in DC volts (I believe there is postition of 20v and under but dont use millivolts, I dont have mine handy to look at and my memory sucks anymore). Have the helper push the start button and put the + lead on one terminal (the one coming from the battery) and the - on the other (the heavy one leading to the starter) it should show a voltage (around 12 or more with a fully charged battery)when the button is pushed with the key on. To see if you are getting power tot he solenoid unhook the wire coming from the start button (again this is where a shop manual helps but it's usually a real thin wire) place the + lead on the wire and the - lead on a ground ( engine, frame, - battery term). have a helper push the start button with the key on. If you have voltage to that wire thats close to battery voltage then you are getting power to the solenoid most likely. You can also test that way with a test light. I know I'm forgetting stuff but you get the idea. Oh yeah, check all your fuses first to make sure none of them are blown.

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1 Answer

Multimeter


Pick up a shop manual. It will tell you how and what to check for coils. I don't know the specs off hand for your coils (they are generally in ohms which measure resistance) or which wire to connect to the multimeter where. You need a shop manual to test coils to get the specs on how many ohms there should be. Make sure the battery is 100% charged and read the manual for your multimeter. You can pop the fuse if you use it wrong and or damage the meter. To test a solinoid you'll need a helper or you can do it yourself but it helps to have someone push the start button for you while you watch the meter. Put the multimeter in DC volts (I believe there is postition of 20v and under but dont use millivolts, I dont have mine handy to look at and my memory sucks anymore). Have the helper push the start button and put the + lead on one terminal (the one coming from the battery) and the - on the other (the heavy one leading to the starter) it should show a voltage (around 12 or more with a fully charged battery)when the button is pushed with the key on. To see if you are getting power tot he solenoid unhook the wire coming from the start button (again this is where a shop manual helps but it's usually a real thin wire) place the + lead on the wire and the - lead on a ground ( engine, frame, - battery term). have a helper push the start button with the key on. If you have voltage to that wire thats close to battery voltage then you are getting power to the solenoid most likely. You can also test that way with a test light. I know I'm forgetting stuff but you get the idea. Oh yeah, check all your fuses first to make sure none of them are blown.

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1 Answer

Multimeter


Pick up a shop manual. It will tell you how and what to check for coils. I don't know the specs off hand for your coils (they are generally in ohms which measure resistance) or which wire to connect to the multimeter where. You need a shop manual to test coils to get the specs on how many ohms there should be. Make sure the battery is 100% charged and read the manual for your multimeter. You can pop the fuse if you use it wrong and or damage the meter. To test a solinoid you'll need a helper or you can do it yourself but it helps to have someone push the start button for you while you watch the meter. Put the multimeter in DC volts (I believe there is postition of 20v and under but dont use millivolts, I dont have mine handy to look at and my memory sucks anymore). Have the helper push the start button and put the + lead on one terminal (the one coming from the battery) and the - on the other (the heavy one leading to the starter) it should show a voltage (around 12 or more with a fully charged battery)when the button is pushed with the key on. To see if you are getting power tot he solenoid unhook the wire coming from the start button (again this is where a shop manual helps but it's usually a real thin wire) place the + lead on the wire and the - lead on a ground ( engine, frame, - battery term). have a helper push the start button with the key on. If you have voltage to that wire thats close to battery voltage then you are getting power to the solenoid most likely. You can also test that way with a test light. I know I'm forgetting stuff but you get the idea. Oh yeah, check all your fuses first to make sure none of them are blown.

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1 Answer

Multimeter


Pick up a shop manual. It will tell you how and what to check for coils. I don't know the specs off hand for your coils (they are generally in ohms which measure resistance) or which wire to connect to the multimeter where. You need a shop manual to test coils to get the specs on how many ohms there should be. Make sure the battery is 100% charged and read the manual for your multimeter. You can pop the fuse if you use it wrong and or damage the meter. To test a solinoid you'll need a helper or you can do it yourself but it helps to have someone push the start button for you while you watch the meter. Put the multimeter in DC volts (I believe there is postition of 20v and under but dont use millivolts, I dont have mine handy to look at and my memory sucks anymore). Have the helper push the start button and put the + lead on one terminal (the one coming from the battery) and the - on the other (the heavy one leading to the starter) it should show a voltage (around 12 or more with a fully charged battery)when the button is pushed with the key on. To see if you are getting power tot he solenoid unhook the wire coming from the start button (again this is where a shop manual helps but it's usually a real thin wire) place the + lead on the wire and the - lead on a ground ( engine, frame, - battery term). have a helper push the start button with the key on. If you have voltage to that wire thats close to battery voltage then you are getting power to the solenoid most likely. You can also test that way with a test light. I know I'm forgetting stuff but you get the idea. Oh yeah, check all your fuses first to make sure none of them are blown.

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