Question about 2003 Harley Davidson FLSTCI Heritage Classic

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Rear wheel nois

Today I had my bike on the centerstand in order to lube the chain. When I finished, I spun the rear wheel around a few times and could hear a sort of metallic scraping sound. At first I thought it was the brakes dragging, but the noise seems to be coming from the side of the wheel opposite from the brake rotor. I gave the wheel a shake and there isnt any play. And you cant really notice the noise when pushing the bike around. Im stumped. My only guess is maybe the wheel bearing? Any ideas?

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How old are the bearings, milage- and age-wise? It probably won't hurt to replace 'em, anyways. There are only a few things at the rear wheel that would cause a scraping sound: wheel bearings, final drive parts rubbing on the rim or swingarm or the braking hardware. Give each of those a very good checking.

Posted on Nov 20, 2008

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Bike chain


With a chain splitter! It's a good idea to change the front and rear sprockets too so buy the lot when you're buying the chain. Loosen the tension on the chain tensioners on the rear wheel. Split the links. Remove chain. Remove and replace sprockets. Replace chain and be sure to use a chain riveter to sort out the joint. Don't be tempted to use a split link as your bike is too big and powerful for one. Adjust your chain tension checking for tight spots etc. Apply lube and enjoy!

Jul 14, 2014 | 1999 Honda VT 750 C2 Shadow

Tip

HOW TO EASILY OIL A MOTORCYCLE CHAIN WITH NO MAIN STAND


If there is no main stand on your motorbike it can be a problem sometimes, not only do side stands dig into soft ground & warm tarmac they also make it awkward to oil the drive chain !

A simple way around this is to get either :-
A piece of strong piece of wood about an inch square ( or in diameter) or
A strong hammer or mallet or
A small trolley jack handle or similar preferably with rubber or taped ends

Whatever you use it must be about an inch (or more) longer than from the ground to the right hand end of the rear spindle (axle) or underside of the right hand swinging arm, WHILE THE BIKE LEANS on its side stand: For the very few bikes that have a side stand on the right, read left hand end of rear spindle

All you have to do is raise the rear wheel slightly by pivoting the weight of the bike on its front wheel & side stand

On medium to large bikes this means getting someone else to position themself on the side stand side of the bike, where they should put 1 foot against the side stand & reach over the bike to grab a good purchase point near the rear wheel, grab the nearest handlebar end with the other hand & pivot the bike forwards on its front wheel & side stand
This will lift the rear wheel a few inches so that your prop can be placed upright between the ground & your selected point on the bike

Spin the rear wheel by hand whilst applying non fling chain lubrication to both edges of your bikes chain

SIMPLE
EFFECTIVE
NO NEED TO CARRY A PADDOCK STAND IN YOUR RUCKSACK

Ride safe
Bike-Doc

I hope this helps (if so give good feedback please)

on Apr 27, 2010 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

My 1972 cl 100 while riding locks up back tire and then skids to a stop and shuts off what is the problem


If you are in gear when your rear tire locks up, that will also stall out your engine. Conversely, if your engine seized up while you were in gear, that would lock up your rear wheel from the other direction. However, as it sounds like you can restart your engine, that's probably not the case. One way to check is that if your wheel starts to lock up, immediately pull in the clutch. Your engine should keep running, even as your rear wheel is skidding along.

If the problem is in your rear wheel, there aren't a whole lot of things to check. This bike uses a rear drum brake, so check to see that's not binding in any way. I suspect that it won't be. A stronger possibility is that your rear bearings are worn out or insufficiently lubed. If they get hot enough and expand enough, they'll seize up your rear wheel. Pulling the rear wheel and cleaning / lubing the bearings would eliminate this possibility. If the bearings are dark colored and/or have flat spots, that's a sure sign that they've been abused and need to be replaced. A third possibility that comes to mind is that your chain and rear sprocket might be excessively worn. An old chain, with one or more rusty links, could kink up and jam. I once bought a bike with a nasty old chain and it did this on occasion. It would work fine for a while, but then kink up. Replacing the chain (and the sprockets, because they, too, were very worn) solved the problem for that bike.

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1 Answer

How often should i oil the drive chain and clean it ? When must it be replaced?


Use commercially available chain lubricant to keep the drive chain from ever running dry. Usually it will be necessary to lube the chain every 200 to 500 miles, depending on how hard your bike is ridden and the conditions it is operated under. Chain lubes available at your local motorcycle shop are far superior to using any other type of lubricant. They are formulated to not fly off and make a mess of your rear wheel, clothing, etc.

If given decent care, you can expect your drive chain to last 10,000 to 20,000 miles. Lubrication and proper adjustment are the keys to success. Ordinary cleaning is not necessary - except for off road bikes.

It is time to replace the chain when you can lift the chain from the sprocket and expose anything more than about 1/2 the length of any tooth on the sprocket.

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1 Answer

What is the correct chain tension for a CBR600f? (2002)


Using a tape measure (or visual estimation, if necessary), grasp the chain at a point halfway between the front and rear sprockets, and pull it up and down. The chain should be able to move roughly one inch up and one inch down. If your motorcycle is on a rear stand or centerstand, note that the swingarm will drop if the wheel is lifted from the ground, which will affect the rear geometry and the tension in the chain; compensate accordingly, if necessary.

Because motorcycle chains can stiffen in certain spots and stay pliable in others, it's important to roll the bike forward (or turn the rear wheel if it's on a stand) and check all sections of the chain. If it moves more than about an inch, the chain will need tightening, and if it's too tight, loosening will be in order; this is outlined in subsequent steps. If individual chain links are too tight, the chain might need replacement.

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1 Answer

Is it possible to use an o-ring chain on a 1997 suzuki gs500, or can I only use a non-"o-ring" type chain? I've got an o-ring chain that doesn't have a master link and so I can't replace the old chain...


You can use the o-ring chain but make sure the lube you use on the chain is o-ring compatible.Some will affect the o-rings in the chain.Only way to get the chain on is to remove the rear wheel.Its not a hard job.1st time you do it,have a pen and paper handy and draw every washer,spacer and backet as you are looking at it.That way when it goes back together, you have a redy ref. to look at.Make sure you draw each shape of each piece.Draw the axle out very slowly so if anything drops,you know where it came from.Also,lay out every item in the order that it was assembled on a clean flat surface.Work slowly.Hope this helps

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1 Answer

Clicking noise from rear wheel


Is your bike chain drive? It sound like you have a link in the chain hanging up. Check it and lube it.

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1 Answer

Chain


Using a tape measure (or visual estimation, if necessary), grasp the chain at a point halfway between the front and rear sprockets, and pull it up and down. The chain should be able to move roughly one inch up and one inch down. If your motorcycle is on a rear stand or centerstand, note that the swingarm will drop if the wheel is lifted from the ground, which will affect the rear geometry and the tension in the chain; compensate accordingly, if necessary. Because motorcycle chains can stiffen in certain spots and stay pliable in others, it's important to roll the bike forward (or turn the rear wheel if it's on a stand) and check all sections of the chain. If it moves more than about an inch, the chain will need tightening, and if it's too tight, loosening will be in order; this is outlined in subsequent steps. If individual chain links are too tight, the chain might need replacement.

Nov 20, 2008 | 2003 Harley Davidson FLHTC Electra Glide...

1 Answer

Chain


Using a tape measure (or visual estimation, if necessary), grasp the chain at a point halfway between the front and rear sprockets, and pull it up and down. The chain should be able to move roughly one inch up and one inch down. If your motorcycle is on a rear stand or centerstand, note that the swingarm will drop if the wheel is lifted from the ground, which will affect the rear geometry and the tension in the chain; compensate accordingly, if necessary. Because motorcycle chains can stiffen in certain spots and stay pliable in others, it's important to roll the bike forward (or turn the rear wheel if it's on a stand) and check all sections of the chain. If it moves more than about an inch, the chain will need tightening, and if it's too tight, loosening will be in order; this is outlined in subsequent steps. If individual chain links are too tight, the chain might need replacement.

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