Question about 2003 BMW R 1150 R Rockster 80e Anniversary

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Tire replacement chain replacement. We are replacing both sprockets also. Does anyone know what the tool is rivet the chain together and where I can get one? Also, does the axle have to be regreased when reinstalling it? If so, general purpose grease? Anything else to be careful of when doing this? It's our first time doing this...thanks.

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Http://www.toolparts.co.uk/acatalog/Motorcycle_Tools.html There is a riveter/breaker tool part way down. Make and model.. you may be able to find one in the states. As for lubing the axle, do it every time, and try to find waterproof grease.

Posted on Nov 20, 2008

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1 Answer

How can I replace a sprocket


If you are replacing a sprocket, you should replace both sprockets, and the chain. These work as a system and tend to wear together. That said the rear sprocket is easier to replace as it just unbolts from the rear wheel once you have the rear wheel removed.

The front sprocket will likely require impact tools, and is accessible under a cover. If you feel you need to take the chain off, there is a C-clip holding the master link in place. Locate and remove the C-clip and master link to remove the chain.

Oct 18, 2014 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

Bike chain


With a chain splitter! It's a good idea to change the front and rear sprockets too so buy the lot when you're buying the chain. Loosen the tension on the chain tensioners on the rear wheel. Split the links. Remove chain. Remove and replace sprockets. Replace chain and be sure to use a chain riveter to sort out the joint. Don't be tempted to use a split link as your bike is too big and powerful for one. Adjust your chain tension checking for tight spots etc. Apply lube and enjoy!

Jul 14, 2014 | 1999 Honda VT 750 C2 Shadow

2 Answers

2000 flstc how to adjust primary chain ?


hi,

Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.

2000-flstc-adjust-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-4-0.jpg

2000-flstc-adjust-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-4-2.jpg

2000-flstc-adjust-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-4-5.jpg

Jun 23, 2012 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLSTC Heritage...

1 Answer

The bar tip end sprocket on my Wild Thing looks like it's out of joint. I can see a little of the bearing and naturally the chain won't turn. Can this be fixed? I mean the sprocket is it removable?...


The sprocket noses are replaceable, they are held with three or four rivets, i have to say i have never had a great deal of sucess replacing them, the bearigs are uncaged and it is easy to lose one or turn one side ways as you push a new nose in, if you rivet the heads too tight the nose will not turn, rivet not enough and the bearings fall out, my best advise is to fit a replacment bar.

Aug 13, 2011 | Poulan Wild Thing 2375 18" Gas Chain Saw...

2 Answers

How do you get the tyre of the rear wheel off a razor 300


Its not meant to be removed. Purchase a new one and save yourself some troubles. You need special tools to remove it. I highly recommend purchasing the wheel complete.

Sep 12, 2010 | Razor E300 Scooter

2 Answers

How to change primary chain tension on 2007 Harley Dyna Low Rider


hi,

Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.

change-primary-chain-tension-2007-harley-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-0.jpg

change-primary-chain-tension-2007-harley-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-2.jpg

change-primary-chain-tension-2007-harley-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-5.jpg

Mar 22, 2010 | Harley Davidson FXDL Dyna Low Rider...

1 Answer

Can you tell me how to change the chain and sproket on a '07 Honda Shadow VLX 600cc???


I don't have any experiance with your particular bike but have changed them on many different bikes to date. You should first purchase a new chain and sprokets and compare them to the existing one prior to removal as you won't be able to refit the old one safely. You are checking for the correct amount of teeth on the sprockets and the amount of links in the chain.

Once satisfied that you have the corrrect parts. Remove the front sprocket cover and locate the front sprocket. Most large bikes will have a large nut holding it on. Smaller bikes will use a tab washer and or circlip. If you have a large nut i find the easiest way to loosen it is to put a lock or similar through the rear wheel to immobilise it and then with a breaker bar loosen the nut. Once free change the sprocket over, then move to the rear sprocket loosing each nut in turn but making sure you are appling pressure to the nut squarely as it is easy to cross-thread these smaller nuts. This is best achevied by leaving the wheel on the bike until all the nuts are free. Remove the wheel and change the rear sprocket. Once done you are now ready to remove the chain from the swing arm. You can either cut it off with an angle grinder or you a chain link tool as i do.

Now the chain is split. Connect the new chain to one end and feed it through. Detach the new from the old and then rivet both ends together using a chain tool as described in the tools specific instructions.

Regards

Chris

Nov 06, 2009 | 2005 Honda VT 600 CD Shadow

1 Answer

Can i remove a 5 gear sprocket from 26" tire, and replace it with a 7 gear sprocket from a 20" tire? my roomates touring bike is currently a 15 speed, she loves the bike and does not want to replace it....


Several scenariosto consider here. First of all the compatibility with the hub. Second is the deraileur tarvel and the actual shifter. Components are normally matched in sets from factory and do not transfer over unless the entire set, shifter, deraileur and sprocket. Then there is the issue of chain wear fitting the crank and new hub together. Chains and gears seat into each other as they wear so a crank set should stay with the original hub as well, even if you were to install a new chain the wear pattern would be different.
So the short answer is unless the brands all match and are in new condition and the hubs are the same thread and diameter, you will not get good results

Sep 14, 2009 | Blackburn Mountain Air Mountain Bike Pump...

2 Answers

How to install hd self adjusting primary chain tensioner in O4 Ultra.



Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.


install-hd-self-adjusting-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-0.jpg

install-hd-self-adjusting-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-1.jpg

Mar 30, 2009 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

2 Answers

Chain


Yes. It’s likely that the sprockets are worn. Putting a new chain non a worn pair of sprockets will make the chain wear out faster—and replacing the sprockets without replacing the chain will sear out the sprockets. Do them as a set.

Nov 20, 2008 | 2005 Harley Davidson VRSCB V-Rod

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