Question about 1975 kawasaki Z1B

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Replacing Z900 brake calipers

I have a Z900 A4 and i want to replace the twin brake calipers with some that actually work !

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If your looking to buy brake calipers call (870) 458-2939 They may have them. I hope this helps

Posted on Nov 26, 2008

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Stuck rear brake caliper on 2003 road king after replacing brakes


Hi Anonymous, jack up bike so rear wheel is off the ground and can spin, bang the caliper on the outer half with a deadblow or rubber mallet 2 or 3 good wacks. Try and spin the wheel, if it spins check the rotor for warpage then check the brake pedal to make it works and is not locking up the rear wheel to where it won't spin freely. If it does lock up then your caliper pistons are cocked and need to be pushed all the way back into the bores and re-bleed the system. Good luck

Apr 22, 2014 | Harley Davidson FLHR Road king Motorcycles

1 Answer

I need instructions for replacing the rear brakes on a 2000 Harley Davidson Road King Classic


Spray some brake cleaner into the existing pad/caliper area FIRST to wash any brake dust away.(being careful of painted surfaces) Take a thin "putty knife" and GENTLY pry the inboard and outboard brake pads away from the brake rotor/disc as far as they will go. Then with a 12pt 1/4" socket, remove the 2 pad retention pins from the caliper's face and let the pads fall out of the caliper's body, being careful to take notice of the pads themselves (they are slightly different) Slide the new pads up into the caliper body one at a time. This will require a little force as there is a spring inside the caliper body. Then you can re-insert the retention pins and snug them down firmly (do not over tighten) Double check your work, use a falshlight if necessary. Make SURE the pads are in place and you have adequate brake pedal "pressure". The bleeding of the caliper might be necessary. If you are wary of this procedure, please have qualifed persons do this critical work.

Aug 08, 2010 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHRCI Road King...

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Replace rear brake caliper with a better unit that work better


Aftermarket brake systems are your only choice as far as I know. Maybe PMC or some other outfit makes them for your bike. You may even have to replace the rotors as well.

Now, there are different types of brake pads that give different levels of performance. Have you tried any of the sintered metal brake pads? If not, these may do what you want at the cost of more rapid wear of the rotors. There are kits available that will stop the rattling. Check Custom Chrome and V-Twin for anti rattle kits and pads.

Dec 13, 2009 | 1993 Harley Davidson FXR Super Glide

1 Answer

I am having problems finding a peddle after replacing the rear brake caliper any tips?There is no pressure at the caliper end of the brake line. I have checked the master cylinder and it is pumping...


it sounds like the brake pipe is blocked up with dirt or somthing,,,take the brake pipe off the rear caliper and stamp on the foot brake peddle if no fluid comes out there is the problem,,,it may be an air lock or just a blockage like you may have twisted the pipe closed doing it up to tightly? or only using one spanner insted of two!!!! if you have closed the pipe up, it would be safer to replace the pipe,,, before it blows out on you! also when you do finaly get brake fludid to the rear caliper,, press the pistons right into the caliper before bleeding the alr out then finaly pump up the brakes,,, dont bleed the brakes to slowly or the air will run back up the pipe,,,,undo the bleed nippel put your finger over the end of it and pump the foot brake about once every second till all the air is out then nip up the nippel,i hope this helps you out

Nov 10, 2009 | 1984 Moto Guzzi Le mans III

2 Answers

BMW R75/7 brake question


I have actually done the conversion and the best thing you can do is fit the smallest mastercylinder you can find - my guru would only fit 11mm m/c s to with ATE calipers . The best pads I found were the EBCs. Most good brake shops will be able to sleeve your existing cylinder down. Forget any piffle you may read about spongy levers and long travel- it just doesnt happen if you have the ability to bleed the brakes. The problem with going away from the BMW m/c is the switchgear and throttle - if you fit another MC you will need new switchgear , twistgrip and cables. It takes major engineering or a brave bodge to fit a different caliper to the ATE fork legs , as the mounting system is unique. The forks from most BMWs interchange , including from the K bikes , but spoked wheels which work with the later and better twin Brembos are scarce and exspensive. I have a pair of Showa forks with twin Brembos off a late K which cost $ 200- on ebay including the wheel , guard and a near new tire. Problem is it is an alloy wheel and the only person I cAn find with a spoked wheel to fit wants $600- for it. And I am not ready to put alloy wheels on my R75/7 just yet.

Nov 20, 2008 | 1976 BMW R 75-7

1 Answer

Replacing break pads


Replacing stock or worn brake pads is the quickest way to get increased braking power out of a tired system. Various manufacturers make all kinds of different types of replacement brake pads for today's motorcycles. Some claim to last longer, while others claim to give more feel and braking power. However, be forewarned that the manufacturer of your motorcycle put a lot of time and effort into developing your braking system, and there is no telling what a different type of pad material might do to your rotors or how well different pads will work with the overall design and setup of your bike. If you have any doubts, then stick with genuine factory parts. Removing the calipers from the rotors is the first step in checking your brake pads. In dealing with your front disc brakes, first remove the Front Caliper two main bolts that attach the calipers to the forks. Once the calipers are free you can slide them off of the brake discs and inspect the amount of pad material and look for anything out of the ordinary. If there is less than 1/8 inches of pad thickness left then they should be replaced

Nov 10, 2008 | 2007 Yamaha XT 660 R

1 Answer

Replacing break pads


Replacing stock or worn brake pads is the quickest way to get increased braking power out of a tired system. Various manufacturers make all kinds of different types of replacement brake pads for today's motorcycles. Some claim to last longer, while others claim to give more feel and braking power. However, be forewarned that the manufacturer of your motorcycle put a lot of time and effort into developing your braking system, and there is no telling what a different type of pad material might do to your rotors or how well different pads will work with the overall design and setup of your bike. If you have any doubts, then stick with genuine factory parts. Removing the calipers from the rotors is the first step in checking your brake pads. In dealing with your front disc brakes, first remove the Front Caliper two main bolts that attach the calipers to the forks. Once the calipers are free you can slide them off of the brake discs and inspect the amount of pad material and look for anything out of the ordinary. If there is less than 1/8 inches of pad thickness left then they should be replaced

Nov 10, 2008 | 1980 Yamaha XS 650 G

1 Answer

Replacing break pads


Replacing stock or worn brake pads is the quickest way to get increased braking power out of a tired system. Various manufacturers make all kinds of different types of replacement brake pads for today's motorcycles. Some claim to last longer, while others claim to give more feel and braking power. However, be forewarned that the manufacturer of your motorcycle put a lot of time and effort into developing your braking system, and there is no telling what a different type of pad material might do to your rotors or how well different pads will work with the overall design and setup of your bike. If you have any doubts, then stick with genuine factory parts. Removing the calipers from the rotors is the first step in checking your brake pads. In dealing with your front disc brakes, first remove the Front Caliper two main bolts that attach the calipers to the forks. Once the calipers are free you can slide them off of the brake discs and inspect the amount of pad material and look for anything out of the ordinary. If there is less than 1/8 inches of pad thickness left then they should be replaced

Nov 10, 2008 | 2005 VOR En-E 530

1 Answer

Replacing break pads


Replacing stock or worn brake pads is the quickest way to get increased braking power out of a tired system. Various manufacturers make all kinds of different types of replacement brake pads for today's motorcycles. Some claim to last longer, while others claim to give more feel and braking power. However, be forewarned that the manufacturer of your motorcycle put a lot of time and effort into developing your braking system, and there is no telling what a different type of pad material might do to your rotors or how well different pads will work with the overall design and setup of your bike. If you have any doubts, then stick with genuine factory parts. Removing the calipers from the rotors is the first step in checking your brake pads. In dealing with your front disc brakes, first remove the Front Caliper two main bolts that attach the calipers to the forks. Once the calipers are free you can slide them off of the brake discs and inspect the amount of pad material and look for anything out of the ordinary. If there is less than 1/8 inches of pad thickness left then they should be replaced

Nov 10, 2008 | 2008 Victory Hammer S

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