Question about 1997 Triumph Trident 900

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95 Trident pick up coil

Hello guys i have a suspect pick up coil on my Trident (fits all symptoms) how do i test it ? is there any ohm readings available or a known process of investigation ?? Any help would be most appreciated ...Greg .Melb.Aust.

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  • Anonymous Dec 28, 2008

    once the bike warms up then she starts misfiring then dies compete i think i have a dodgy coil how can i test

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Hi Greg

You should read less than 5000 ohms on any pickup coil. check also to see if there is any leakage to earth with the pickup still mounted. there should be none. You should read at least a few hundred millivolts of AC voltage out of the pickup when cranking. If it is intermittent, then no amount of measuring will help you tell if it is faulty, changing it out will. Hope this helps you. Good luck. Triumphs rock!!

regards
robotek

Posted on Nov 13, 2008

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When i turn My Solara DSC VHF radio on it no longer beeps . I cannot hear any squelch or pick up any channels. Is this my speaker that has gone.


To test a speaker, you'll need either a digital multimeter or an analog multimeter that can read measurements of resistance (Ohms)
First isolate the speaker from the amplifier (meaning, remove the wires attached to the speaker terminals).
Set the meter to Ohms (Omega symbol).
Take the meter test leads and place each one on the speaker terminal (make sure the test leads do not touch each other)- there is no polarity to this test so it doesn't matter which test lead goes where on the speaker terminals
For an 8-Ohm rated speaker, you should get a reading of about 6-7 Ohms (approximately 15% of the speaker rating)
For a 4-Ohm speaker, around 2-3 Ohms
and for a 16-Ohm speaker, about 8-Ohms
If you can an infinite reading (make sure the test leads are not touching each other) other wise, if the test leads are not touching and you get an infinite reading, there is a short in the voice coil; speaker is defective.
OL reading on the DMM, or O Ohm resistance on analog meter, broken wire connection inside the coil= open voice coil and is defective.
If you get the proper reading on your speaker, the problem IS NOT with the speaker

Feb 24, 2017 | VHF Boating

2 Answers

How do you check a 1991 GM Sierra truck pick up coil


With a Volt Ohm meter.
The pick up coil should produce a low AC voltage when the distributor shaft turns as in cranking the engine.

Mar 18, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

What would cause my 84 monte carlo 305 only fire on 4 cylinder


Bad pick up coil in distributor or worn shaft. The wires on the pick up coil should have 500 ohms to 1500 ohms resistance.
Move the wires and vacuum advance while testing, reading should not change. Then test resistance from one coil pick up wire to distributor housing this should be infinity.
Wiggle the shaft and see if there is any sideways movement.

Apr 25, 2015 | 1984 Chevrolet Monte Carlo

1 Answer

Firing order coil pack 2000 ford explore 5-0


Firing Order is 1 3 7 2 6 5 4 8

JF: Integrated Ignition Coil On Plug Coil 1 Through 10 Failure

2000 PCED On Board Diagnostics II


SECTION 5: Pinpoint Tests




Procedure revision date: 01/31/2001










JF: Integrated Ignition Coil On Plug Coil 1 Through 10 Failure


? JF: Introduction




JF1 DETERMINE WHICH COIL IS NOT FIRING

    Note: Electronic ignition engine timing is entirely controlled by the PCM. Electronic ignition timing is NOT adjustable. Do not attempt to check base timing. You will receive false readings.

  • Determine which coil is not firing using information from Pinpoint Test JB or DTC and the table at the beginning of this pinpoint test.


  • Record cylinder, coil and PCM pin number from the table.


Have the cylinder number, coil driver and PCM pin number been recorded?







Yes


No






GO to JF2.


To obtain required information, GO to JF1 and REPEAT.




JF2 DTC P0351, P0356, P0357: CRANKSHAFT POSITION SENSOR FAILURE
Are any of the above listed DTCs present?







Yes


No






GO to JF3.


GO to JF4.




JF3 CHECK RESISTANCE OF CRANKSHAFT POSITION SENSOR


  • Measure resistance of crankshaft position sensor.


Is resistance between 290 and 390 ohms (for LS8 between 900 and 1300 ohms)?







Yes


No






GO to JF4.


REPLACE crankshaft position sensor. COMPLETE Misfire Monitor Repair Verification Drive Cycle (REFER to Section 2, Drive Cycles).




JF4 CHECK FUNCTIONALITY OF SUSPECT COIL DRIVER (CD) CIRCUIT


  • Disconnect suspect coil (determined from the table).


  • Connect incandescent test lamp between IGN START/RUN and suspect CD circuit (determined from the table) at the coil on plug harness connector.


  • Disable fuel pump by disconnecting inertia fuel shutoff switch.


  • Observe incandescent test lamp while cranking engine.


Is the test lamp blinking consistently?







Yes


No






KEY OFF. GO to JF5.


KEY OFF. GO to JF6.




JF5 CHECK FUNCTIONALITY OF SUSPECT COIL


  • Remove suspect coil (determined from the table) from spark plug.


  • Connect an air gap spark tester 303-D037 (D81P-6666-A) or equivalent to a suspect coil.


  • Reconnect suspect coil harness connector.


  • Observe spark tester while cranking engine.


Is the spark present?







Yes


No






KEY OFF. INSPECT spark plug, REPLACE if necessary. GO to Z1.


KEY OFF. REPLACE coil. INSPECT spark plug, REPLACE if necessary. COMPLETE Misfire Monitor Repair Verification Drive Cycle (REFER to Section 2, Drive Cycles).




JF6 CHECK IGN START/RUN VOLTAGE TO SUSPECT COIL


  • Key on, engine off.


  • Measure voltage between IGN START/RUN circuit at the coil on plug harness connector and ground.


Is voltage greater than 10.0 volts?







Yes


No






KEY OFF. GO toJF7.


KEY OFF. LS6 and LS8: GO to B5.

All others: IGN START/RUN circuit fault. CHECK condition of related fuses/fuse links. If OK, REPAIR open circuit. If fuse/fuse link is damaged, CHECK IGN START/RUN circuit for short to ground. REPAIR as necessary. COMPLETE Misfire Monitor Repair Verification Drive Cycle (REFER to Section 2, Drive Cycles).




JF7 CHECK SUSPECT CD CIRCUIT FOR OPEN IN HARNESS


  • Disconnect PCM.


  • Measure resistance of suspect CD circuit between PCM harness connector pin (determined from the table) and coil on plug harness connector.


Is resistance less than 5 ohms?







Yes


No






GO to JF8.


REPAIR open circuit. COMPLETE Misfire Monitor Repair Verification Drive Cycle (REFER to Section 2, Drive Cycles).




JF8 CHECK SUSPECT CD CIRCUIT FOR SHORT TO VPWR IN HARNESS


  • Key on, engine off.


  • Measure voltage between suspect CD circuit at the PCM harness connector (determined from the table) and ground.


Is voltage less than 1.0 volt?







Yes


No






KEY OFF. GO to JF9.


KEY OFF. REPAIR short circuit. COMPLETE Misfire Monitor Repair Verification Drive Cycle (REFER to Section 2, Drive Cycles).




JF9 CHECK SUSPECT CD CIRCUIT FOR SHORT TO GROUND IN HARNESS


  • Disconnect scan tool.


  • Measure resistance between suspect CD circuit at the PCM harness connector (determined from the table) and ground.


Is resistance greater than 10,000 ohms?







Yes


No






GO toJF10.


REPAIR short circuit. If symptom or DTC is still present, GO to JF11 to check for damaged coil, otherwise COMPLETE Misfire Monitor Repair Verification Drive Cycle (REFER to Section 2, Drive Cycles).




JF10 PERFORM INTERMITTENT TEST ON SUSPECT CD CIRCUIT HARNESS


  • Connect digital multimeter between suspect CD circuit at the PCM harness connector (determined from the table) and CD circuit at coil on plug harness connector.


  • Wiggle and bend CD harness from PCM harness connector to coil on plug harness connector.


Did resistance fluctuate during wiggle test?







Yes


No






REPAIR intermittent fault in harness. COMPLETE Misfire Monitor Repair Verification Drive Cycle (REFER to Section 2, Drive Cycles).


REPLACE PCM. (REFER to Section 2, Flash Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory (EEPROM)). If symptom or DTC is still present, GO to JF11 to check for damaged coil, otherwise COMPLETE Misfire Monitor Repair Verification Drive Cycle (REFER to Section 2, Drive Cycles).




JF11 CHECK SUSPECT COIL FOR DAMAGE


  • Remove suspect coil (determined from the table) from spark plug.


  • Connect an air gap spark tester 303-D037 (D81P-6666-A) or equivalent to a suspect coil.


  • Disable fuel pump by disconnecting inertia fuel shutoff switch.


  • Observe spark tester while cranking engine.


Is the spark present?







Yes


No






KEY OFF. INSPECT spark plug, REPLACE if necessary. GO to Z1.


KEY OFF. REPLACE coil. INSPECT spark plug, REPLACE if necessary. COMPLETE Misfire Monitor Repair Verification Drive Cycle (REFER to Section 2, Drive Cycles).

Feb 14, 2015 | 2000 Ford Explorer

1 Answer

95 mustang, driving along and car just dies. wait 30 min s0metimes it will start and sometimes it wont. no spark. why?


Ignition modules and pick-up coils are pretty common on the older fords. When it doesn't start check for pulse at the coil. You can do this with a test light. Hook the lead wire of the test light to ground. Unplug the coil, turn the key on and see which of the two wires has power to it. Then plug the coil back in and back probe the wire that did not have power and crank the engine over. The test light should flash. If it does not than I old suspect the ignition module and would probably replace the pickup cl in the distributor for good measure. This was a fairly common symptom back in the day.

Jan 14, 2012 | 1995 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

How to check ignition coil for proper operation


  1. Connect an ohmmeter between the TACH and BAT terminals in the distributor cap. The primary coil resistance should be 0 or nearly 0 ohms . If not replace the coil.
  2. To check the coil secondary resistance, connect an ohmmeter between the rotor button and the BAT terminal. Note the reading. Connect the ohmmeter between the rotor button and the TACH terminal. Note the reading. The resistance in both cases should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms. Be sure to test between the rotor button and both the BAT and TACH terminals.
  3. Replace the coil only if the readings in Step 1 and Step 2 are infinite resistance or out of specification.
jturcotte_2418.gif





All tests included below.

The symptoms of a defective component within the HEI system are exactly the same as those you would encounter in a conventional system. Some of these symptoms are:


Hard or No Starting Rough Idle Poor Fuel Economy Engine misses under load or while accelerating.
If you suspect a problem in your ignition system, there are certain preliminary checks which you should carry out before you begin to check the electronic portions of the system. First, it is extremely important to make sure the vehicle battery is in a good state of charge. A defective or poorly charged battery will cause the various components of the ignition system to read incorrectly when they are being tested. Second, make sure all wiring connections are clean and tight, not only at the battery, but also at the distributor cap, ignition coil, and at the electronic control module.
Instruments designed specifically for testing HEI systems are available from several tool manufacturers. Some of these will even test the module itself. However, the tests given in this section will require only an ohmmeter and a voltmeter.

CAUTION The HEI ignition system can generate voltage of 30,000-50,000 volts. When testing the system, DO NOT hold a spark plug wire while the engine is running or cranking. Personal injury and or damage to the ignition system may result if this caution is not followed.
Since the only change between electronic and conventional ignition systems is in the distributor component area, it is imperative to check the secondary ignition circuit first. If the secondary circuit checks out properly, then the engine condition is probably not the fault of the ignition system.
If the engine won't start, perform this test. This will narrow the problem area down considerably.
  1. Remove one of the plug wires and insert a HEI spark tester tool in the plug socket.
  2. Ground the spark tester to the block and crank the engine. DO NOT touch the spark plug wire while the engine is cranking.
  3. The spark should be crisp and bright blue in color. If a normal spark occurs, try each spark plug wire until a no spark condition or a weak orange color spark is found. If all sparks are good, the problem is probably not in the ignition system. Check for fuel system problems, or fouled spark plugs.

If no spark occurs, check for the presence of normal battery voltage at the battery (BAT) terminal in the distributor cap. The ignition switch must be in the ON position for this test. Either a voltmeter or a test light may be used for this test. Connect the test light wire to ground and the probe end to the BAT terminal at the distributor. If the light comes on, you have voltage to the distributor. If the light fails to come on, this indicates an open circuit in the ignition primary wiring leading to the distributor. In this case, you will have to check wiring continuity back to the ignition switch using a test light. If there is battery voltage at the BAT terminal, but no spark at the plugs, then the problem lies within the distributor assembly. Go on to the distributor components test section.


If the engine runs, but runs roughly or cuts out, make sure the plug wires are in good shape first. There should be no obvious cracks or breaks. You can check the plug wires with an ohmmeter, but do not pierce the wires with a probe.
If the plug wires are OK, remove the cap assembly and check for moisture, cracks, chips, carbon tracks, or any other high voltage leaks or failures. Replace the cap if any defects are found. Make sure the timer wheel rotates when the engine is cranked. If everything is all right so far, go on to the distributor components test section.
DISTRIBUTOR COMPONENTS TESTINGSee Figures 2 and 3
If the trouble has been narrowed down to the units within the distributor, the following tests can help pinpoint the defective component. An ohmmeter with both high and low ranges should be used. These tests are made with the cap assembly removed and the battery wire disconnected. If a tachometer is connected to the TACH terminal, disconnect it before making these tests.
  1. Connect an ohmmeter between the TACH and BAT terminals in the distributor cap. The primary coil resistance should be 0&omega or nearly 0&omega . If not replace the coil.
  2. To check the coil secondary resistance, connect an ohmmeter between the rotor button and the BAT terminal. Note the reading. Connect the ohmmeter between the rotor button and the TACH terminal. Note the reading. The resistance in both cases should be between 6,000 and 30,000&omega. Be sure to test between the rotor button and both the BAT and TACH terminals.
  3. Replace the coil only if the readings in Step 1 and Step 2 are infinite resistance or out of specification.

jturcotte_2419.gif

Fig. Fig. 2: Checking coil resistance. Ohmmeter 1 shows primary test. Ohmmeter 2 shows secondary test.
These resistance checks will not disclose shorted coil windings. This condition can only be detected with scope analysis or a suitably designed coil tester. If these instruments are unavailable, replace the coil with a known good coil as a final coil test.

  1. To test the pick-up coil, first disconnect the white and green module leads. Set the ohmmeter on the high scale and connect it between a ground and either the white or green lead. Any resistance measurement less than infinite requires replacement of the pick-up coil.
  2. Pick-up coil continuity is tested by connecting the ohmmeter (on low range) between the white and green leads. Normal resistance is between 650 and 850&omega, or 500 and 1,500&omega on 1977 and later models. Move the vacuum advance arm while performing this test (early models). This will detect any break in coil continuity. Such a condition can cause intermittent misfiring. Replace the pick-up coil if the reading is outside the specified limits.
  3. If no defects have been found at this time, and you still have a problem, then the module will have to be checked. If you do not have access to a module tester, the only possible alternative is a substitution test. If the module fails the substitution test, replace it.

jturcotte_2420.gif

Fig. Fig. 3: Pick-up coil testing

Oct 24, 2011 | 1989 Buick Park Avenue

1 Answer

I feel a misfire but there no codes stored on the ecm


More than likely you need new spark plugs, or you have a bad Coil on plug. To test each coil on plug, read the following:
  • A commercial coil tester, available from many tool suppliers, is an excellent way to test suspect coils. If the coil can generate a spark on the tester, the coil should be in good condition.
  • An ohm meter can also be used to test coil winding resistance. Primary-side resistance, from coil minus to coil plus, is typically between 0.3 and 1.0 ohm on electronic ignition type coils.
  • Secondary resistance values vary widely, so consult a specifications chart for the engine you are servicing. If a spec chart isn't available, compare secondary readings among all the coils to see if any one is higher than the others. A high resistance indicates deterioration in the wiring. Surprisingly, a coil with high resistance may still fire the spark plug, but the voltage produced will be higher because the current must jump the open wiring in addition to jumping the spark plug gap.

Jun 02, 2011 | 1999 Lincoln Navigator

1 Answer

89 k1500 towed, now fuel injectors dont fire. read all wired to and from ecm, check good. ecm will start another truck.


Check the ECM fuse and then check for any loose wire connectors, especially at the fire-wall area, the ignition coil, and the distributor. Then check for battery voltage at the positive side of the ignition coil when the ignition key is in the "On" or "Run" position, and there should also be battery voltage running over from a wire that is also connected to the positive side of the ignition coil, and then that wire will run over from the ignition coil to the ignition module inside of the distributor, and if there is battery voltage there at the ignition module, then either the ignition module or the pick-up coil inside of the distributor will be the most likely suspects for the cause of the problem.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is actually what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like it could also be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

The same principal applies to HEI (High Energy Ignition) ignition systems with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap.


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Sep 18, 2010 | 1989 Chevrolet K1500

1 Answer

Hello i have a 1989 sunbird 2 liter engine,i changed plugs,wires,cap,rotor button,fuel pump and fuel filter,it idles great but if you drive it for maybe 30kms and come to a stop sign it will stall...


There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil. A faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Jun 25, 2010 | 1989 Pontiac Sunbird

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