Question about 1994 BMW K 75 S

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K 75 I'm getting ready to start riding again after a 30-year hiatus. When I took the MSF intro. course (to make sure I wasn't too old :-)) I rode a couple of the small cruisers, which is what I thought I wanted. Didn't like them, so I started looking for a used bike that would give me a more traditional riding stance. Have been impressed with the K75s. Would appreciate your opinions as to the suitability for someone returning to riding after a long hiatus.

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As long as you are 5 feet 9 or taller the K modelss are fine. They are great to ride but awkward to wheel around or backwards because of their weight. The RS models with their relatively low and narrow handlebars exacerbate this.

Posted on Oct 23, 2012

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I will premise this by saying I have not taken a hiatus from riding for any longer than 18 months. So 30 years ~ WOW! My recollections after not riding for a while and getting ready for that first ride afterwards, are that balance and protection from injury in case of an accident were at the forefront of my thoughts. Well, the BMW K75s is a very well-balanced bike. Having owned one for ten years, I will never not own at least one K bike, likely not the 100 either. The handling of the bike is far superior to other bikes I have ridden, albeit only rice burners and Harleys. The K75sis a sporty looking machine, but also has great touring characteristics (who said you get only one or the other??). I would easily ride fully loaded from KC to Dallas (about 7.5 hours) stopping for little more than fuel and a strech. I guess I am a pretty big fan of the BMWs, and the K75S in particular.

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

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SOURCE: K 75

I will premise this by saying I have not taken a hiatus from riding for any longer than 18 months. So 30 years ~ WOW! My recollections after not riding for a while and getting ready for that first ride afterwards, are that balance and protection from injury in case of an accident were at the forefront of my thoughts. Well, the BMW K75s is a very well-balanced bike. Having owned one for ten years, I will never not own at least one K bike, likely not the 100 either. The handling of the bike is far superior to other bikes I have ridden, albeit only rice burners and Harleys. The K75sis a sporty looking machine, but also has great touring characteristics (who said you get only one or the other??). I would easily ride fully loaded from KC to Dallas (about 7.5 hours) stopping for little more than fuel and a strech. I guess I am a pretty big fan of the BMWs, and the K75S in particular.

Posted on Nov 20, 2008

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SOURCE: K 75

I will premise this by saying I have not taken a hiatus from riding for any longer than 18 months. So 30 years ~ WOW! My recollections after not riding for a while and getting ready for that first ride afterwards, are that balance and protection from injury in case of an accident were at the forefront of my thoughts. Well, the BMW K75s is a very well-balanced bike. Having owned one for ten years, I will never not own at least one K bike, likely not the 100 either. The handling of the bike is far superior to other bikes I have ridden, albeit only rice burners and Harleys. The K75sis a sporty looking machine, but also has great touring characteristics (who said you get only one or the other??). I would easily ride fully loaded from KC to Dallas (about 7.5 hours) stopping for little more than fuel and a strech. I guess I am a pretty big fan of the BMWs, and the K75S in particular.

Posted on Nov 20, 2008

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figure I'll throw in my 2cents from my own experience. I picked up the SV650 as my first bike last year. I had not been on a bike thats not pedal powered before, however I used to live on my bicycle, did lengthy tours on it, commute on it, modded it, did all the work on it myself. My point being I knew I loved the feeling of being on two wheels, riding. And I was very experienced with being a bike in traffic. so that was going to be a non-issue. I picked up a book called "How to Ride a Motorcycle" by Pat Hahn. In there he says In the authors opinion Suzuki can claim to offer the best all around beginner bike in the SV650. Light, nimble, quick, adaptable, fun, and cheap, its easy to ride - which means you'll learn very quickly - yet versatile enough to keep you entertained for a while. Great I thought, but he also stressed the importance of the MSF beginners course. So I got myself into a class and practiced in my apartment complex on my sv while I waited. When I took the class I was amazed at how much I learned so quickly on the nighthawk 250. I left feeling very confident having received a perfect score on my test (in fact the instructor said that if all his students had my kind of background on bicycles he'd have a class full of perfect scores, pretty cool I thought) After that riding the SV became easier and my learning has continued full boar.

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May 31, 2012 | 1998 Suzuki LS 650 Savage

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I have a 1980 Suzuki GS750L. I left the brake light on over night and as a result the battery is dead. I jumped the bike with my car battery. (The car wasn't running) The bike started and I rode it...


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1 Answer

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Jul 10, 2011 | 2000 Yamaha V-Max

1 Answer

K 75


I will premise this by saying I have not taken a hiatus from riding for any longer than 18 months. So 30 years ~ WOW! My recollections after not riding for a while and getting ready for that first ride afterwards, are that balance and protection from injury in case of an accident were at the forefront of my thoughts. Well, the BMW K75s is a very well-balanced bike. Having owned one for ten years, I will never not own at least one K bike, likely not the 100 either. The handling of the bike is far superior to other bikes I have ridden, albeit only rice burners and Harleys. The K75sis a sporty looking machine, but also has great touring characteristics (who said you get only one or the other??). I would easily ride fully loaded from KC to Dallas (about 7.5 hours) stopping for little more than fuel and a strech. I guess I am a pretty big fan of the BMWs, and the K75S in particular.

Nov 20, 2008 | 1992 BMW K 75 S

1 Answer

K 75


I will premise this by saying I have not taken a hiatus from riding for any longer than 18 months. So 30 years ~ WOW! My recollections after not riding for a while and getting ready for that first ride afterwards, are that balance and protection from injury in case of an accident were at the forefront of my thoughts. Well, the BMW K75s is a very well-balanced bike. Having owned one for ten years, I will never not own at least one K bike, likely not the 100 either. The handling of the bike is far superior to other bikes I have ridden, albeit only rice burners and Harleys. The K75sis a sporty looking machine, but also has great touring characteristics (who said you get only one or the other??). I would easily ride fully loaded from KC to Dallas (about 7.5 hours) stopping for little more than fuel and a strech. I guess I am a pretty big fan of the BMWs, and the K75S in particular.

Nov 20, 2008 | 1994 BMW K 75 S

1 Answer

Learner


Any cc over 50cc will require a motorcycle endorsement on your current drivers license. A 125cc bike is small however very easy to ride due to size and weight. You can take a MSF safety course for around $100 in most states and that will qualify you for your endorsement as long as you pass the written test. ( In the state of NC is where I live) Enjoy the journey of riding. It is great fun and cost effective as well.

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Congrats & Happy Bike Day! They let you test ride them both? How lucky!!

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