Question about 2007 Yamaha XT 660 R

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Replacing break pads

How to replace my brake pads?

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Replacing stock or worn brake pads is the quickest way to get increased braking power out of a tired system. Various manufacturers make all kinds of different types of replacement brake pads for today's motorcycles. Some claim to last longer, while others claim to give more feel and braking power. However, be forewarned that the manufacturer of your motorcycle put a lot of time and effort into developing your braking system, and there is no telling what a different type of pad material might do to your rotors or how well different pads will work with the overall design and setup of your bike. If you have any doubts, then stick with genuine factory parts. Removing the calipers from the rotors is the first step in checking your brake pads. In dealing with your front disc brakes, first remove the Front Caliper two main bolts that attach the calipers to the forks. Once the calipers are free you can slide them off of the brake discs and inspect the amount of pad material and look for anything out of the ordinary. If there is less than 1/8 inches of pad thickness left then they should be replaced

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

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Hello, I'm changing rear break pads on my softail


I'm going to attach a photo to this solution. The bolts you are taking out hold the caliper together. You don't want to take these out to simply replace the pads. If you're rebuilding the caliper, you'll have to split the caliper to get the pistons out. But, just to replace the pads. You'll see two pins (#35 on the pic) that run across the between the two halves of the caliper. These pins hold the pads into the caliper.

First you must use a large screwdriver to pry the old pads apart. You must get the pistons seated fully down into the caliper. Once you get the pistons seated, drive these pins out to the rear of the caliper. Lift the pads out and drop the new pads in with the fiber side towards the rotor. Do not put the pads in with metal to metal. Don't laugh, i've seen it done before. Then install on pin, install the spring plate that holds the pins in and the brake pads tight, and finally the last pin.

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When riding an annoying rattle is coming from


Go to your local autoparts store. There is a blue aeresol you can spray on the back of the pads. This should DEFINITELY help, if not solve the problem altogether.

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My front brakes are rubbing against the wheel making a noise, the fluid isnt clear and low. I dont know whether the break pads are worn. Could you please give me some advice on this please thanks Jon


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There are two bolts that hold/guide the two brake pads. Remove them and they should come right out. The new pads are going to be larger so you will need to compress the cylinder. A c-clap is what i used and it worked pretty well. Large pliers could possibly work too. Once compressed put the new pads on. If it makes it easy you may take off the whole brake caliber its typically two large bolts then just slide the pads between the disk brake and put the large bolts back in..And thats it! Good Luck!
PS You do not have to disconnect any hydraulic lines, that can get messy so dont touch them! Also the cylinder is what pushes up again the one break pad if your unsure. you will see it, its a cylinder shape hense the name cylinder and about the size of a half dollar!

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Process of changing the rear brake pad on the Kawasaki vulcan 900 classic ---could not find the 900 on the drop down menus


Remove the 2 break bolts that hold the break to the bracket. Remove the pin covers on the side. <2 flat heads> Remove the Alan key pins and old pads will come out. Use a c clamp and a rag to compress the caliper piston. replace break pads pins and pin covers. Re bolt the break to the bracket. pump breaks till stiff. open bleeder. pump twice and close during pump. clean up and enjoy ;D

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1 Answer

Replacing break pads


Replacing stock or worn brake pads is the quickest way to get increased braking power out of a tired system. Various manufacturers make all kinds of different types of replacement brake pads for today's motorcycles. Some claim to last longer, while others claim to give more feel and braking power. However, be forewarned that the manufacturer of your motorcycle put a lot of time and effort into developing your braking system, and there is no telling what a different type of pad material might do to your rotors or how well different pads will work with the overall design and setup of your bike. If you have any doubts, then stick with genuine factory parts. Removing the calipers from the rotors is the first step in checking your brake pads. In dealing with your front disc brakes, first remove the Front Caliper two main bolts that attach the calipers to the forks. Once the calipers are free you can slide them off of the brake discs and inspect the amount of pad material and look for anything out of the ordinary. If there is less than 1/8 inches of pad thickness left then they should be replaced

Nov 10, 2008 | 1980 Yamaha XS 650 G

1 Answer

Replacing break pads


Replacing stock or worn brake pads is the quickest way to get increased braking power out of a tired system. Various manufacturers make all kinds of different types of replacement brake pads for today's motorcycles. Some claim to last longer, while others claim to give more feel and braking power. However, be forewarned that the manufacturer of your motorcycle put a lot of time and effort into developing your braking system, and there is no telling what a different type of pad material might do to your rotors or how well different pads will work with the overall design and setup of your bike. If you have any doubts, then stick with genuine factory parts. Removing the calipers from the rotors is the first step in checking your brake pads. In dealing with your front disc brakes, first remove the Front Caliper two main bolts that attach the calipers to the forks. Once the calipers are free you can slide them off of the brake discs and inspect the amount of pad material and look for anything out of the ordinary. If there is less than 1/8 inches of pad thickness left then they should be replaced

Nov 10, 2008 | 2005 VOR En-E 530

1 Answer

Replacing break pads


Replacing stock or worn brake pads is the quickest way to get increased braking power out of a tired system. Various manufacturers make all kinds of different types of replacement brake pads for today's motorcycles. Some claim to last longer, while others claim to give more feel and braking power. However, be forewarned that the manufacturer of your motorcycle put a lot of time and effort into developing your braking system, and there is no telling what a different type of pad material might do to your rotors or how well different pads will work with the overall design and setup of your bike. If you have any doubts, then stick with genuine factory parts. Removing the calipers from the rotors is the first step in checking your brake pads. In dealing with your front disc brakes, first remove the Front Caliper two main bolts that attach the calipers to the forks. Once the calipers are free you can slide them off of the brake discs and inspect the amount of pad material and look for anything out of the ordinary. If there is less than 1/8 inches of pad thickness left then they should be replaced

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