Question about 2008 Ridley Auto Glide Limited

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Chain master link

Just replaced the master link on my chain. (04 Autoglide) Do I need to take vice grips and crimp down the little rivet like pieces on the link? The others seem to be somewhat flat.

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You will need to smash the rivets or you will loose the link for sure. It takes a special tool that I'm sure you don't have. The correct master link should be available locally. I have just checked our inventory and can only find the clip style links. If we sent you the rivet style it must have been the last one. We have plenty clip style links here but Tuesday is the best we can do now for shipping. I apologize for not sending the clip style. I'll check on how that happened.,

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

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2 Answers

Adjust primary chain on 2000 fatboy


hi,

Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.


adjust-primary-chain-2000-fatboy-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-0.jpg

adjust-primary-chain-2000-fatboy-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-2.jpg

adjust-primary-chain-2000-fatboy-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-5.jpg

Oct 07, 2014 | 2003 Harley Davidson FLSTFI Fat Boy

2 Answers

2000 flstc how to adjust primary chain ?


hi,

Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.

2000-flstc-adjust-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-4-0.jpg

2000-flstc-adjust-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-4-2.jpg

2000-flstc-adjust-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-4-5.jpg

Jun 23, 2012 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLSTC Heritage...

1 Answer

How do i remove my suzukie dr200se chain all together?


There could be a master link with a clip. Look on both sides of the chain as the clip is normally on the outside but not always. Remove the clip and master link.

If there is no clip and the chain is not going to be reused then cut it off (in one piece it stays around the swing arm). There are chain cutting tools or a saw of some kind will do.

If you don't have a master link with a clip (Factory OEM usually don't) and your needing to save that chain you will need to purchase a tool that presses out the pins. You would also need to purchase a master link that fits the size of that chain (not all chains are made equal).

A chain tool is good to have though. Say you purchase a chain and it has 120 links and you only need 118 then you're going to need to remove some links. Also the tool kits come with a special pin when using pressed on master links (better than the clip master lnks).

Remember when installing a clip on a master link that the round part goes on facing the direction of the chain travel with the open part facing the rear.

Aug 27, 2011 | Suzuki EC 300 2T Motorcycles

2 Answers

Do you have any idea how to check the chain adjustment on a 2002 Dyna Low


hi,

Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.

any-idea-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-0.jpg

any-idea-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-2.jpg

any-idea-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-4.jpg

any-idea-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-7.jpg

May 14, 2011 | 2000 Harley Davidson FXDWG Dyna Wide Glide

1 Answer

How do I find the master link on my 06 honda shadow spirit? I know that it is rivided on but to me they all look the same.


A master ling has extended slotted pins, a link plate and a retainer clip. If you do not have one of those you do not have a master link. To break your chain you need a special chain breaker which pushes out any pin you select. You can knock out pins on a vice with a pin punch as well if you do not have a chain breaker, but it is a hassle.

Mar 22, 2011 | Honda VT 750 DC Shadow Spirit Motorcycles

1 Answer

I need to remove chain and fit new but not sure about fitting riveted link as have always used a joining link. do i rivet new link using rivet removal tool ? many thanks Roger


Some tools do both riveting and removal, does yours? If you are unsure or not confident I would fit the usual joining link (should be supplied with the new chain) and take it to a bike shop and get them to rivet it. This would be far cheaper than buying the right tool, and you dont want the chain to come apart when riding.

Aug 04, 2010 | 2008 Honda XL 1000 V Varadero

2 Answers

How to change primary chain tension on 2007 Harley Dyna Low Rider


hi,

Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.

change-primary-chain-tension-2007-harley-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-0.jpg

change-primary-chain-tension-2007-harley-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-2.jpg

change-primary-chain-tension-2007-harley-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-5.jpg

Mar 22, 2010 | Harley Davidson FXDL Dyna Low Rider...

1 Answer

How to replace chain and front sprocket on a 2005 yamaha r1.


This is just a guese ive never worked on a R1 but most bikes are similar with chains.

Firstly to loosen the axel and the chain tightners and pull the wheel as far foward as you can. then to find the master link in the chain its a funny looking link with a clip on it, it might not have one if its a compressed link chain, but for this sake lets hope you have it, when you find it use some needle nose pliars and take the clip off and then pull the link outwards it will come off like a washer and push the other side out, theres the chain broken so it can come off, its its a new chain your installing you could cut the old chain off with a hack saw or grind on one of the links. as long as the new chain comes as one long peice not a circle with no master link.

to get the sprocket off the front find where the chain goes too and un bolt the cover for it it should not be water tight. then the sprocket will have a Circlip or a bolt on it, if its a circlip get a flat screw driver in the space and turn or use the right tool. if its a bolt nock it in gear and try to undo it with a ratchet if it just turns the engine you will need to undo the timing plug on one side of the engine and put a ratchet on the flywheel while un bolting the sprocket you could also do this while the chain is on the bike and put the rear brakes on and un bolt the sprocket, this will stretch the chain but your changing it anyway.

new sprocket is same way just slide it on and clip or bolt get your chain all the way around all sprockets and the master link will probly be an O-Ring chain, if so you need some vice grips and a 8 or 10mm nut or a 1/4 american nut and you put the rubbers on either side and the plate
and put the nut over the link heads and clamp down til the clip slots are showing do this to both sides of the link. then put your clip on with needle nose pliars and pull the wheel back with the chain tensioners and tighten your axel
you want a bit of play with your chain so it can stretch when you sit on the bike, you will need to tighen it for a few hundred miles dayly while the chain stretchs and wears in.

if you need any more assistance email me ( Skuly@hotmail.com )

Feb 16, 2010 | 2005 Yamaha YZF-R1

2 Answers

How to install hd self adjusting primary chain tensioner in O4 Ultra.



Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.


install-hd-self-adjusting-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-0.jpg

install-hd-self-adjusting-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-1.jpg

Mar 30, 2009 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

Chain master link


you will need to smash the rivets or you will loose the link for sure. It takes a special tool that I'm sure you don't have. The correct master link should be available locally. I have just checked our inventory and can only find the clip style links. If we sent you the rivet style it must have been the last one. We have plenty clip style links here but Tuesday is the best we can do now for shipping. I apologize for not sending the clip style. I'll check on how that happened.,

Nov 10, 2008 | 2007 Ridley Auto Glide Old school

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