Question about 2002 Moto Guzzi California 1100 EV Special Sport Aluminium

1 Answer

Voltage unstable - need help analyzing

Always had a stable 13-13.5V reading on the dashboard meter

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 500 times.

  • Master
  • 2,336 Answers

But lately it has been more varied. Basically voltage is low at start-up (typ. 11-12V) and it doesn't increase with engine rpm. But switching the lights off for a few seconds always brings the voltage up to a higher level (13-14V) it only falls slightly when the lights are turned on again. It then (usually) sinks slowly and lights off-on will (usually) bring it back up again. Does this behaviour indicate where the fault is?,Sounds like the battery is on the way out.,,,

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

How can I tell if my voltage regulator is working properly?


Hi Tom, for more information about your question please visit the website below. Good luck and have nice day.
Stock motorcycle regulator rectifier check out

Jun 08, 2015 | 1993 Harley Davidson FLSTF Fat boy

Tip

How To Test The CHarging System On Your Late Model Harley-Davidson.


Use a digital voltmeter for best results, I personally like the Fluke brand of meters as they are simple to use and a very high quality tool. With the motorcycle turned off to start with. Set your meter to VDC and place your probes across the battery posts(if your memory is bad write these numbers down). If your battery is fully charged you should see between 12.2 and 13.5 VDC on the meter. Now again in VDC start the motorcycle and note the readings on the meter with the bike idling again you should see around 12.2 and 13.5 VDC slightly increase the throttle speed you should see the reading increase to between 13.5 and 14.5 VDC if this is the case your charging system is working, if you see more then 14.8 to 15 VDC with the bike running around 2000 RPM you have a voltage regulator problem and it needs to be replaced. If you see only battery voltage(meaning no increase from what your reading was with the bike off) you can have a multitude of issues happening.
1) stator could be bad
2) voltage regulator could be bad
3) battery could be faulty
4) you could even have a poor ground
First thing to check would be that your battery connections are tight and clean. Also check all the ground connections I.E The opposite end of the ground cable, also check to make sure that your voltage regulator is bolted tightly to the frame and that the ground connections is clean and free of paint(paint can inhibit a good quality ground).
Second and from my experience in Harley-Davidson this is the most common issue with HD charging systems. Its called a grounded stator. meaning that you have an unwanted ground. Set your meter to Continuity preferablly on an audible setting that will beep when you continuity.
On the left side of the bike as if you were sitting on it at the front of the primary case you will see a plug going into the primary case, this is where your stator is housed and of course we all know electrics and liquids dont mix but HD puts the two together and due to it your HD is destined to use up stators over the years.
With the key off disconnect this plug, now again in continutity,first touch your meter probes together you should hear a tone or beep. now touch one meter lead to any good ground honestly anyone of the primary case bolts should be sufficent then put your other meter lead in either of the 2 holes of the stator plug where it comes out of the primary case. If you get a tone you have a grounded stator and it needs to be replaced. This condition can exsist even if the charging system is still charging so always check for this.
Now on to testing your voltage regulator since we already have it unplugged at the stator(the plug that connects to the stator plug runs back to the voltage regulator. Follow this plugs wiring back to the voltage regulator and find the single wire that runs back to the battery or to the main circuit breaker and then to the battery. disconnect this single wire at the breaker if thats where it goes first. If it goes direct to the positive side of the battery then disconnect it there.
This time in Ohms place one meter lead on the end of the single wire and the other meter lead on either one of the pins that would normal connection to the stator. Note your reading, as a rule it shouldnt be more then 1 - 2 Ohms of resistance through any wire.
From my experience and I have done alot of charging systems for HD over the years.
First thing to go is usually the stator, when the stator goes it usually kills the voltage regulator if not taken care of right away. There is also a test for output from the stator to the voltage regulator and this is checked with all your connections tight and clean. Make sure everything is connected with the exception of the stator plug to the voltage regulator at the primary case.
Now this time your meter needs to be in VAC notice that is Volts AC for this test. You might want a friend to hold the throttle for you during this test. now place each of your meter leads in the plug coming out of the primary case(stator) start the bike up and you should see at an idle around 16 - 19 VAC if you increase the rpms you should see this reading increase as well around 17 VAC per 1000 RPMs so if your holding at 3000 RPMs you should see 50 VAC. If your getting anything below around 40 VAC at 3000 RPMs your stator is not putting out a sufficent amount of voltage and needs to be replaced. When I see this particular condition I always replace the stator and voltage regulator both as there is a good chance the voltage regulator has been spiked or over worked and will fail shortly.
Just to wrap this tip up let me say that before you attempt to change your stator or anything electrical really disconnect the battery first. The fingers you save maybe your own. I hope this helps anyone that may read it even a little bit. Good luck and thanks for using FixYa.com


on May 03, 2010 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

Voltage regulator


Hi Anonymous, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12 volts or better after charging.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at both ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor. Good luck

Jan 28, 2014 | Harley Davidson Motorcycles

1 Answer

2002 Harley ultra high voltage


Hi Anonymous, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12 volts or better after charging.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at both ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor. Good luck

Sep 23, 2013 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

Showing 13.9 to 14.3 volts at battery at idle. At higher rpm voltage drops dramatically. Have replaced voltage regulator. Any ideas?


Hi Kevin, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12.5 volts or better after charging.
3. Hook up battery positive cable, then with your multimeter on the milliamp scale connect one lead to the negative battery post and the other lead to the ground cable. Meter should read 3 milliamps or less, 10 milliamps with a radio, 15 milliamps with radio and CB. If your meter reads higher you need to isolate the circuit by pulling fuses and circuit breakers one at a time and observe meter for drop in aprerage then get out your test light and track down the short in that circuit.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at "BOTH" ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v while cranking replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor.
17. For a free wiring diagram please visit the website below. Good luck and have nice day.
Harley Davidson Wiring Diagrams and Schematics

Mar 25, 2013 | 2011 Harley Davidson FXDB Street Bob

1 Answer

My voltage meter on dash not charging only sometimes!! It's charges!!!


This is what I would suggest before just changing the stator out. Hope this helps.Okay first step is to check voltage on battery.Most times it is a low voltage battery and easiest to fix. Checking the charging system to see if the voltage regulator or stator is bad read this...

Step 1. Normally, you'd first load test the battery,
Start the engine and measure DC Volts across the battery terminals, the regulator should be putting out 14.3 - 14.7 vdc at 3600 rpm and 75 degrees F.


Step 2. To check the regulator unplug it from the stator. Take a test light and clip it to the negative terminal of the battery and then touch first one pin and then the other on the plug that goes to the regulator. If you get even the slightest amount of light from the test light the regulator is toast.

To do this with a meter which is more accurate: black lead to battery ground, red lead to each pin on the plug, start with the voltage scale higher than 12vdc and move voltage scale down in steps for each pin. Any voltage is a bad regulator.
You may get battery voltage on all three pins on the newer 3 phase regulators.
The no voltage is for older type regulators with diode indicating the diode is bad and the regulator needs replacing.


Step 3. On the other part of the disconnected regulator plug. Set the multimeter for Ohms x1 scale and measure for resistance across the pins of the stator. You should read something around 0.1 to 0.2 ohms for the TC88 32 amp system.


Step 4. Then check for continuity between each pin on the plug and frame/engine ground. The meter needle should not move (infinite resistance)(digitals will show infinite resistance) if the meter needle does move (indicating continuity)(digitals will show some resistance), recheck very carefully. If the meter still shows continuity to ground the stator is shorted (bad).


Step 5. Set the meter to read A/C volts higher than 30 volts (the scale setting for voltage should always be higher than the highest voltage you expect or you may fry the meter). Start the bike, and measure from one pin to the other on the plug (DO NOT cross the multimeter probes! - touch them to each other). You should read roughly 16-20 vac per 1,000 rpm.


Step 6. If the battery was good under load test, if the stator is NOT shorted to ground, and the stator is putting out A/C voltage, then the regulator is bad (most likely even if if passed step 2).


Generally the following is true:
Check your owners/service manual for the system amp output for your bike.
22 amp system produces about 19-26 vac per 1,000 rpm, stator resistance is about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms.
32 amp system produces about 16-20 vac per 1,000 rpm, stator resistance is about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms.
45 amp system produces about 19-26 vac per 1,000 rpm, stator resistance is about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms.

Oct 27, 2012 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

Bought new LED indicators for my Legend and changed the flasher unit to suit. They flash at proper speed when engine not running, but increase in frequency the more revs are applied. Any ideas, please?


I would check the battery voltage and ensure the battery voltage doesn't go above 14 volts. There may be a regulator fault. If all reads OK with a meter, replace the flasher unit for a more stable one.
Hope this helps and ride safely.

Feb 23, 2011 | 2001 Triumph Triumph Thunderbird

1 Answer

While riding the bike shuts down like when you turn off the ignition, it lasts just seconds and comes back to life..


Hi There,
9 out of 10 times it is loose battery terminals, corroded terminals. - Clean and tighten.

TEST:
Test your volatge regulator by attaching a voltmeter to you battery:
With bike off battery meter should read 12.50 +/- .25 volts - anything lower-battery needs charge
With Bike on at idle meter should read 12.80 +/- .25 volts - anything lower-voltage regulator bad
Rev to 2000 rpm meter should read 13.75 - 14.80 volts - anything lower-voltage regulator bad

Before replacing the voltage regualtor make sure the groung wire from the voltage regulator is tight and recheck with the meter.

Check your ignition wire screws, one may have vibrated loose. - Inspect / check for tightness
Check that wires connected to coil are tight .

Most of the time its just a loose connection. Find and tighten.

Dec 03, 2010 | Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

New batterie new negative wire new posative wire but wont charge . are there any reiays or fuses causing this problem?


You need to check the output of your alternator. You'll need a DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) to check the outputs.

First connect the meter across your battery. Red meter lead to the positive terminal, black meter lead to the negative or a good ground. Put the function selector of your meter in DC VOLTS, 20 VOLT RANGE. Start the engine and bring it to a high idle, 2000 RPM. Your meter should read 14.5 to 15.0 volts. Turn all lights on and make sure the voltage stays the same.

If your meter reads low in this test, you need to check the output of the stator. On the lower left front of the engine, you'll see a plug where the voltage regulator plugs into the engine case. Unplug this plug and look into the part that is in the engine case. You'll see two metal contacts. These are what you're going to put your meter leads to in this test. Since the voltage is now AC volts, it makes no difference which lead goes to which contact. Put your meter's function selector in AC VOLTS, 50 VOLT RANGE. Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. Insert the meter leads into the contacts. The meter should read at least 30 volts AC voltage here.

If the alternator stator test fails, you need a new stator. If it passes the test but the voltage to the battery is low, you need a new regulator.

If both pass the test, you need to evaluate the current draw of any extra lights or other equipment that you may have put on the bike. If your equipment is drawing more current than the alternator is capable of producing, a slow drawdown of the battery is the results.

Good Luck
Steve

Oct 25, 2010 | 2000 Harley Davidson XL 1200 C Sportster...

2 Answers

Voltage unstable - need help analyzing


but lately it has been more varied. Basically voltage is low at start-up (typ. 11-12V) and it doesn't increase with engine rpm. But switching the lights off for a few seconds always brings the voltage up to a higher level (13-14V) it only falls slightly when the lights are turned on again. It then (usually) sinks slowly and lights off-on will (usually) bring it back up again. Does this behaviour indicate where the fault is?,Sounds like the battery is on the way out.,,,

Nov 10, 2008 | 2001 Moto Guzzi California 1100 E.V.

Not finding what you are looking for?
2002 Moto Guzzi California 1100 EV Special Sport Aluminium Logo

Related Topics:

126 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Moto Guzzi Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

60769 Answers

Arnie Burke
Arnie Burke

Level 3 Expert

4471 Answers

Steve Sweetleaf
Steve Sweetleaf

Level 3 Expert

1128 Answers

Are you a Moto Guzzi Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...