Question about 2002 Moto Guzzi California 1100 EV Special Sport

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Tyres and pressures

I have a 2001 cali special with the alloy spoked tubless rims. Cant find anywhere what the pressures should be. Running at 34 front 36 rear as a guess. I also have metzler tyres on and will have to change soon anybody experience what tyres are best for these models.

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The Cali' Special tyre pressures:- --------------- 1 RIDER.---------------------- 2 RIDERS Front ...... 2.3 Bar(33.5psi) ................... 2.3Bar(33.5psi) Rear ....... 2.5Bar(36.3psi) .................... 2.9Bar(42psi) I use BT45's on mine but I have the ordinary tubed rims. I find the ride harsh but this may be down to suspension rather than tyres. People recommend running the BT45 at a slightly higher pressure than the book. I got 8500 miles from the front and 4700 from the rear. Although the rear was changed slightly early due to a puncture. I will probably try a different make next time.

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

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I just god a new tire, tube, rim and spokes. Except i dont know how to install the spokes! How do i install spokes through the holes and to the rim? What is the correct order to put them in? What direction...


Thank you for the inquiry.
This is one of those projects in life that best requires special tools (Spoke Jig) and a lot of patience. I also recommend a couple of good quality spoke wrenches. The one that comes with your tool kit usually is for general emergency spoke tightening and minimal maintenance. Even at the shops there is not to many people that know how to do this well. It's time consuming and shop labor is expensive.
That being said here goes:
To get started you will need to know a couple of things:
  1. Spoke lacing pattern
  2. Rear sprocket/hub alignment position. (Chain must run true from front primary sprocket) this applies only if this is a rear wheel.
I've posted a link to some helpful pictures of wheel lacing on various bikes to give you a few tips and pointers. http://www.rcycle.com/wheellacing.html
Look at the spoke pattern on your other wheel to determine the direction to push the spokes through and determine the spacing pattern for the short or long spokes.
1) Lay the hub flat on a bench and install the spokes loosely in correct pattern. 2) Lay the rim over the spokes and push them through. Spoke direction corresponds to the receiving angle on the rim. Important to get started correctly than alternate. 3) Thumb tighten a couple of the nuts/ferrels loosely to hold rim in position. 4) Tighten nuts according to get the hub centered as best as possible (just to temporarily hold) 5) You can build a fixture with a couple of 2 x 4s as shown in the illustration or carefully clamp the bikes axel in a vice, not to damage the threads or pinch the axel nut.Horizontal position. 6) You will need to clamp a coat hanger or a heavy piece of wire to something solidly fixed to act as a reference guide. 7) Tighten spokes first for correct up/down centering then for left/right centering. 8) UP and Down: Position your gauge wire close to the top/front of the rim and rotate. Finger tighten and loosen the spoke nuts until you get the wheel running true for up/down motion. Keep going around and redoing until you get it as perfect as you can finger tight only. 9) Move you wire gauge to the side of the rim and repeat process. The front rim has a disc brake position to align for (not to critical) and the rear rim has a critical sprocket position to maintain. You will have to measure the sprocket offset to get it correct. Chain must run true. 10) Spin the rim on the axel for reference and Keep going around and tightening and loosening the spokes until you get the side alignment running true. May take a while and many spins. 11) Once you get the rim running true for both wobble and run out you are ready to slowly start tightening the spoke nuts with your spoke wrench's. Take you time and keep tightening in tiny amounts until you get tight and true. Tap the spokes as you go and listen for tension. 12) When you tap if you get a dull thunk - it's a little loose. If you get a ringing musical string sound you know you are tight and/or close depending on the amount of ring. Take your time.
Before you mount the tire be sure you mount the rim on the bike and run the axel in place to final check for front brake rotor alignment or real sprocket alignment. You may have to adjust.
I have always wrapped duct tape in the V-slot to hold the nuts and prevent spokes from coming up and puncturing the tube. Go around several times. Just maintain the groove so you can still have room to place the tire bead in to stretch for mounting.
Best wishes and good luck from a fellow biker/racer.
TF

Jun 03, 2011 | 2002 Yamaha TT-R 125

1 Answer

Can i change my pulsar 150 2003 to alloy wheels with tubles tyre and what is the advantage after changing this


That sounds like a lot of work and expense, if alloy wheels are available. Unless you have some alloy wheels of another bike and the axles, sprocket and brakes are compatible.
There is no real advantage, apart from tubless tyres can sometimes have punctures repaired without removing the tyres from the rims.
If punctures are a worry, then fit heavy duty inner tubes, which will last for years

Feb 25, 2011 | Bajaj Pulsar 150 Motorcycles

1 Answer

Whats the correct tyre pressure for my 2001 suzuki burgman an 400 also if by chance i had put 4 bar in the tyre by mistake but only had the scooter on the centre stand have i done any harm


Hi, a 1999-2003 suzuki burgman /an 400 using standard tyre sizes 110/90-13 front is 1'75 bar (25psi)
130/70-13 rear is. 2 bar-(29psi) and 2.8 bar (41psi when carrying a passenger) check the tyre for correct seating on the rim, dont think you have done any harm, the only danger inflating small tyres to a high pressure is you risk blowing it off the rim, as you have now corrected it you should be ok with that, paul

Feb 21, 2011 | 2001 Suzuki AN 400 Burgman

1 Answer

IHave a kawasaki el 250 1995 air leaking from the rear tyre but its coming from the wheel spokes, any idea how to solve this Thanks mark


Yes if it is leaking from the spokes that means that you need a new inner tube. Wheels with spokes are only supposed to use tubed tires. If you want to go tubeless there is a place in California that will seal the wheels for you. Look it up on Google, do a search for sealing rims with spokes.

Feb 18, 2011 | 1998 kawasaki EL 250 Eliminator V

1 Answer

Wobble at above 65


Better start checking everything. depending on the severity of the wobble, it may just need something simple like a new tyre. But all of the following can cause a problem
Tyres worn
tyre pressures\and balance\incorrect sizes
wheel bearings front and rear
spoke tension( if it has spokes)
Head bearings\twisted forks
swing arm bushes
change front fork oil\check suspension settings
loose axle bolts
bent discs
string line the wheels
bent frame or forks

Apr 25, 2010 | 2004 Harley Davidson FLHT - FLHTI Electra...

1 Answer

What size is the rear wheel? And also what spokes will fit the standard rims, i cant find them anywhere, as i have snapped a couple! Thanks


Have you checked with the dealer??? Reat tire size stamped on the rear tire ... Look here for additional information ...http://hrca.honda.com/

Apr 03, 2010 | 2005 Honda CRF 100 F

2 Answers

Shimmy in the front end at speeds of 45 to 50 and above 65 on deacceleration. Never had the problem before and the bike is an 08 and about 2500 miles


Check that all nuts and bolts that fasten the front lower forks to the wheel axle are tight and in good shape. Also the front tire may have a shifted belt which is difficult to diagnose but can cause the symptom you are describing. If you ran over a pot hole or nasty bump the rim may be bent. While driving the bike try to look down at the front wheel to observe any warpage on the rim if the rim is bent bring it to a motorcycle repair shop they can tighten the spokes in a way that will straighten the rim.

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I own a 1991 gsf400 bandit..I have to replace the stock tires with new ones and have a very good deal on the Michelin Power ct2's..the stock tire size is front-110/70/17...and rear-150/70/17....can i...


I suggest you stick with the stock tire size. If you don't, the speedometer will not read correctly. With a smaller tire if the speedo says 65 you will really be doing 55 or so. The actual mileage driven will be off as well. The lower profile tires also do not cushion the rim as well. The spokes are more likely to get out of whack. It is also harder on the brakes since the brake disk is spinning faster to go the same distance as a stock tire would be turning.

Apr 24, 2009 | 1991 Suzuki GSF 400 Bandit

1 Answer

Tyres


If you are considering racing in F4 or Buckets on your motoFXR you have a choice of running street tyres (BT39 are great) in the production class or you can fit slicks and run in the Super Bucket class (these are South Island Classes) if you fit slicks on stock FXR rims you need to run tubes inside , the slicks are 95/70-17 fronts and 115/70-17 Rears, same as RS125 GP bikes use, this is not a perfect solution as the rims are slightly narrow and the contact patch on the ground is not optimum. To get a really nice profile on the tyres you can fit some other rims, my bike has RG200 rims and the tyres fit great, GSXR250 rims are good also they have a 2.5” front and 3.0” rear, there is a wee bit of machining to be done at each end as the front bearings don’t fit the fxr axle and the rear disk has to be moved inwards aprox 10mm. Usually the slicks we run on F4 or Buckets are used RS125 tyres which are relatively cheap but sometimes hard to find. A 15hp bike doesn’t exactly eat tyres like a 50hp bike so they last for ages, if they are a bit hard you can borrow a grooving tool and cut some groves in the tyre, this makes them heat up more, also it makes you feel better about riding with slicks in the rain

Nov 10, 2008 | 2001 Suzuki FXR 150

1 Answer

Tyres and pressures


The Cali' Special tyre pressures:- --------------- 1 RIDER.---------------------- 2 RIDERS Front ...... 2.3 Bar(33.5psi) ................... 2.3Bar(33.5psi) Rear ....... 2.5Bar(36.3psi) .................... 2.9Bar(42psi) I use BT45's on mine but I have the ordinary tubed rims. I find the ride harsh but this may be down to suspension rather than tyres. People recommend running the BT45 at a slightly higher pressure than the book. I got 8500 miles from the front and 4700 from the rear. Although the rear was changed slightly early due to a puncture. I will probably try a different make next time.

Nov 10, 2008 | 2002 Moto Guzzi California 1100 EV Touring

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