Question about 2003 Laverda 750 S

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Laverda frame numbers

I have a chance to buy a Laverda 750S. 1969. The bike is unrestored. All seems to be OK. Except that the saddle is not original. 1. I like to know where to get info about frame and engine numbers. I can't find it on the website. 2. Is the frame same as SF? (if I decide to built FCS look)

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According to the repair guide the year 69 had frame numbers from 1650 to 2800 but this includes GT. The frame is different from SF frames,

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

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1998 problems with laverda 750s why does my bike not start first time and keeps cutting out, what are the most common problems with this model and how do i fix it


The most common complaints are the poor gas mileage, weak electric starter, not as fast off the line as the Japanese bikes, slower top end speed, top heavy and not a good commuter bike. Additionally, dealers are few and far between. Install new spark plugs, clean the air filter, clean or at least drain the carbs to remove any water in the float bowls. Do a compression check to see if the valves need to be re-seated.

Apr 22, 2011 | 1971 Laverda 750 S

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Why does bike size is important?


It is clear that wearing a shirt two sizes too small would be uncomfortable, and wearing a shirt two sizes too large wouldn't be good either. In the same way, riding a wrong size bike will fit badly and make you uncomfortable, too. There are two main problems, one obvious and one a little more subtle.

The first big problem with a bike that doesn't fit is saddle height. You need the saddle to be just high enough to give your legs the right extension when you pedal. Too low and your legs stay bent too much all the way around; this doesn't use your leg muscles well and you wear out quickly. Too high and you rock back and forth on the saddle as you pedal, very uncomfortable. Either extreme (too high or too low) can also be very hard on your knees.

Saddle height is adjustable, of course, and if the bike frame is at least close to the right size, you'll be able to adjust the saddle to the proper height. If the frame is a lot too small, you can usually overcome this problem by buying a longer seatpost to move the saddle back up to where you want it. (But that causes other problems we'll talk about soon.) If the frame is much too large, you won't be able to drop the seat far enough to be usable, and there is no practical way around that problem.

The saddle on a bike can be adjusted up and down several inches, even as much as a foot if you consider replacing the original seatpost with a longer one. But the handlebars can't be moved nearly as far as saddles can. Most handlebars can be adjusted up and down or forward and back only two inches or so, and even this small change is often a complicated operation of replacing parts, not just loosening a few bolts.

This can lead to all sorts of problems. If the handlebar is too far away from the saddle, you have to bend down further and reach far out to grab the bars. This puts more weight on your back, arms and hands, which is uncomfortable. Having the handlebar too close to the saddle is less of a problem, but in extreme cases it can cause your knees to bump the handlebars when you are standing up to climb a hill. Having the handlebar a lot lower than the saddle is similar to having it too far away-you have to bend far over and reach further to grab the bars, an uncomfortable position. Having the handlebars high up is not a big problem, except that sitting upright slows you down. Your legs aren't as strong when you are sitting up, and that position causes more wind resistance when riding fast or into a wind.

Bike size has a big effect on handlebar position. If the frame is too small, you'll have to push the seat up high to fit your legs. You won't be able to move the handlebar up as much, so it will be a long reach back down to grab the bars, and your back will be quite bent over. If on the other hand the frame is too large, the bars will be up high but might be too far forward (since the frame gets longer as well as taller).

Dec 21, 2010 | Cycling

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How bike size is measured?


So what does "different frame size" actually mean? And what does that frame size number, 13" or 25" or whatever, mean? It's fairly simple.

The frame size number comes from the length of the seat tube. The seat tube is that nearly vertical tube of the three big tubes that make up the "main triangle" of the bike frame. The seat tube has the bike's saddle attached at the top, and has the pedals and crank arms attached at the bottom. A short seat tube will make the pedals closer to the saddle; a long seat tube will make the pedals further away. The frame size number is the length from the center of the crank arm spindle (the axle that holds the two crank arms together) up to the top of the seat tube (where the saddle and seatpost are attached). On some bikes this is measured in inches, on others in centimeters.

But that's not the only dimension that changes for different frame sizes. As bicycle frames get taller, they also get longer. That means the distance from the saddle to the handlebars gets longer. This makes sense, since tall people don't just have longer legs than short people. They usually also have longer arms, a longer torso, and so on. So the bike frame also needs to get longer in every direction for a taller rider, not just longer from pedal to saddle. The top tube gets longer, which pushes the handlebars further away from the saddle. The head tube (the frame part that the fork attaches to) gets taller, so the handlebars will be higher up. All of these dimensions and more are fine tuned in every frame size, so the right size frame for a person's height fits well everywhere, not just in the saddle.

Dec 21, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

How size is measured? So what does “different frame size” actually mean? And what does that frame size number, 13” or 25” or whatever, mean?


The frame size number comes from the length of the seat tube. The seat tube is that nearly vertical tube of the three big tubes that make up the "main triangle" of the bike frame. The seat tube has the bike's saddle attached at the top, and has the pedals and crank arms attached at the bottom. A short seat tube will make the pedals closer to the saddle; a long seat tube will make the pedals further away. The frame size number is the length from the center of the crank arm spindle (the axle that holds the two crank arms together) up to the top of the seat tube (where the saddle and seatpost are attached). On some bikes this is measured in inches, on others in centimeters.

But that's not the only dimension that changes for different frame sizes. As bicycle frames get taller, they also get longer. That means the distance from the saddle to the handlebars gets longer. This makes sense, since tall people don't just have longer legs than short people. They usually also have longer arms, a longer torso, and so on. So the bike frame also needs to get longer in every direction for a taller rider, not just longer from pedal to saddle. The top tube gets longer, which pushes the handlebars further away from the saddle. The head tube (the frame part that the fork attaches to) gets taller, so the handlebars will be higher up. All of these dimensions and more are fine tuned in every frame size, so the right size frame for a person's height fits well everywhere, not just in the saddle.

Dec 16, 2010 | Cycling

2 Answers

I own a 2003 laverda 750S. I battle to get it started, the starter battles to turn the motor!!


how good is the battery check terminals are clean leads and all conections are good try remote battery and jump start it like a car if the problem goes away its your battery if not its the starter or solinoid or leads

Jun 23, 2010 | 1971 Laverda 750 S

1 Answer

I bought a new seat for my 1996 Fuji Sagres. The old saddle clamp is too narrow for the new seat rails. Where can I buy a different sized saddle clamp that will fit my bike?


take it to a bike shop and get a new seatpost. bike shops
have manuals that they can check to find a seat post that
fits the bike frame and has the proper size rails to fit your
new saddle.
this is a good time to upgrade the seatpost, you can get one
that is lighter and more adjustable that your old one.

Jun 06, 2009 | Cycling

1 Answer

Help with Early 750S (1969)


it had an incorrect seat on it and I would like to fit a bumstop style seat to the bike. It is different (slightly wider) than the later bikes. If anyody could help (even a loaner pan I could make a copy of)it would be appreciated. By the way I have some stuff from a crashed early 750GT that I have no use for and is available for trade or cheap. I don't have any bodyworkmainly forks. rear wheel airbox, that type stuff.,My memory of the 69 American Eagle is that it should have a locally made fibreglass tank, as that model was only a dressup bike done by Mr Mcormick of Continental Motorcycles. (he also badged up a British made moto crosser as an American Eagle, was it a Sprite or maybe and AJS Stormer) should be a slabby thing not unlike a cofin shape. Lance Weil of Ricky Racer had a couple a few years back and he is very near to you phone 1-800 Laverda, try him you never know.The seat should be the same width as the proper Laverda's (I think) It was only the 650 (42 in number) and the first 750 (the remaining batch up to 100) so another 58 that had the very first type chassis,quite a bit different in the way the tubes drop down to the swingarm pivot, or am I getting too much fuzz into the old grey matter, I could be wrong.,,,

Nov 10, 2008 | 2001 Laverda 750 SS

1 Answer

750S (1997) lugage systems


Saddle Bags and a tank bag. I use RKA products which are excellent and have been using the same ones for a few years.,

Nov 10, 2008 | 1971 Laverda 750 S

1 Answer

What tyres for Zane 750 Sport?


and was wondering if other Zane riders have a view on what's good/not good? I'm looking for something most suitable for fast winding road use rather than mainly track. I had Dunlop 207's on mine and recently switched to Pirelli Dragon Supercorsa SC 2's. The the SC's are amazing,,

Nov 10, 2008 | 2002 Laverda 750 S

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