Question about 2005 Husaberg FS 650 c

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Pads problem I have this odd sort of situation that's been going on for quite a while and I'm not sure what to make of it. It was exasperated in my last track day. When the bike is cold

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The front brakes work spectacularly. After a while or on a hot day when the bike slows to say 20mph and the front brakes are applied the front brakes chatter very much like the rotor is warped (continuous, pretty consistent skipping). This is not seen in the cool mornings even at low speed. Since I just pulled the front wheel off for a tire change, I loosened and re-torqued all the rotor bolts to spec, hoping this would resolve the issue; I haven't had a chance to ride it since the change. Anyone have any thoughts on what might be happening? Could the rotors be perfectly flat/straight until they heat up, and then warp? If so, I presume my only option is to replace them, but how do I avoid this situation in the future? What are some possible causes?,Your pads got glazed,,,

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

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1 Answer

When changing the front brake pads is it suppose to feel tight


is what supposed to feel tight ?
.... remove old pads , clean calipers , push back pistons ... add anti seize to backs of pads ... reinstall , check brake fluid is at correct level , go for a ride , ... get up to about 50 kph , then apply brakes in a progressive manner to bed brake pads in , do it 5 times , to make sure ...

May 22, 2014 | 2005 Honda CB 750

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Replaced front brake pads on my 2007 vtx1300r. now front lever is spongy. bled brakes quite a few times. still spongy. what went wrong. replaced the rear but had no issues.


The brakes must be trimmed to set closer as possible without the pads rubbing the caliper so that there is least movement of the piston when the hydraulics works.
So even if the system is bled and there is no air lock on the system , it is important to set the levers closer to the pads. So use the adjustment of the assembly so as to keep it closer to the pad.
Hence when the brakes are applied there will be immediate tightness to the lever as the pads close contact with the pads and hold on.
So I suggest that since you have overhauled the brakes and changed the pads this must be reset.

Feb 18, 2011 | 2004 Honda VTX 1300 Retro

1 Answer

Hello, I'm changing rear break pads on my softail


I'm going to attach a photo to this solution. The bolts you are taking out hold the caliper together. You don't want to take these out to simply replace the pads. If you're rebuilding the caliper, you'll have to split the caliper to get the pistons out. But, just to replace the pads. You'll see two pins (#35 on the pic) that run across the between the two halves of the caliper. These pins hold the pads into the caliper.

First you must use a large screwdriver to pry the old pads apart. You must get the pistons seated fully down into the caliper. Once you get the pistons seated, drive these pins out to the rear of the caliper. Lift the pads out and drop the new pads in with the fiber side towards the rotor. Do not put the pads in with metal to metal. Don't laugh, i've seen it done before. Then install on pin, install the spring plate that holds the pins in and the brake pads tight, and finally the last pin.

Since you broke the torque on the bolts that hold the caliper together, make sure they are tight. You may have to bleed the brakes as well. Make sure you have a full firm brake pedal and test the brakes to make sure they work before riding the bike.


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Nov 08, 2010 | 2000 Harley Davidson FXSTS Springer...

1 Answer

Replace rear break pads on 2006 elica glide


Remove the saddlebags or whatever so that you can get to the rear brake caliper. There are two bolts holding the caliper into it's bracket. Usually they take a Torx type wrench to get them out. Remove the bolts and set the caliper aside being careful not to put any stress on the hose. Sometimes there is a clip that holds the hose to the rear swing arm that you may want to take off to keep from bending the hose to sharply.

Once you have the caliper off, you can see the pads and the anti-rattle hardware associated with them. Look closely at the way the anti-rattle hardware is postitioned in the caliper so you can get it back in the same way. Now, replace the pads and hardware. Make sure you have the fiber face of the pads next to the rotor. I've seen many installed metal to metal, expecially on the backside.

Now, use a large C-clamp or a pair of large slip joint pliers to press the piston all the way back into it's bore in the caliper. Use rags or pieces of wood to prevent scarring the paint or the alumnium caliper. With the piston fully compressed, carefully slide the caliper back down into the bracket without disturbing the brake pads and hardware. Torque the bolts to 18-20 foot pounds.

Slowly work the rear brake pedal until you get a full firm pedal. Test the brakes before riding the bike. Failure to do this job correctly can cause serious injury or death. Make sure you do this job correctly. If your bike quits, it makes you made. If your bike won't stop, you could wind up dead.

Good Luck
Steve

Aug 07, 2010 | 2004 Harley Davidson FLHT - FLHTI Electra...

1 Answer

How to change front brake pads on 2004 harley davidson road king


Never did that on a 2004 king. But if they are like the ones on my 2000 Wide Glide;

USE LOCTITE ON ALL THREADS. JUST A FEW DROPS WILL DO.

There are two pins that go through the caliper that hold the pads in place You will need a different socket to loosen them. It is a 1/4 inch with twelve points. The bolts that hold the caliper to the forks are also a 12 point but I believe it is a 10mm. So go get the right sockets.

Now that you have those odd tools, loosen but do not remove the two pins in the caliper.

Before you go farther, check the fluid level in the master. If fluid was added when the pads wore down, it will now have too much fluid and could spill on the bike when you open the calipers. It should appear a bit low right now. If not, remove some fluid so it can't spill.

Remove the two bolts that hold the entire caliper to the fork. Notice if one is longer than the other. some Harleys use a longer bolt in the top hole. Make sure they go back in the same place.

Slide the caliper off of the brake rotor. Use a tool to pry the caliper wide open. You need all the space you can get or the new pads will not slide over the rotor. If you don't have a "regular" tool for that, I have used two screw drivers or pry bars in an X pattern by pressing against the pads until all of the pistons are fully depressed.

Now you can remove the pins from the caliper. Might to pull with pliers. Pay attention to where the brake pads go. One pad has two full tabs next to the hole where the pin goes through and the other pad has one tab and one rounded off section next to the hole.

Ok now look back at how your old pads were installed in the caliper. My book is for the wide glide so it might be different. Put the new pads in the same location as your old ones were in.
If for some reason you lost track then use the next paragraph in { }.

{ If your bike has two front brakes, on the right brake caliper, the pad with two tabs installs on the inside closest to the wheel. The pad with only one full tab goes on the outside, away from the wheel.
For the left caliper, the pad with two full tabs installs on the outside furthest away from the wheel. The pad with only one tab goes on the inside closest to the wheel. }

Slip the new pads into the caliper. Install the pins by pushing in till you feel or hear a small click. You probably will have to jiggle the pads around to get the pins through but stop at the click or the pins will be too far through. Slip the caliper over the rotor and loosely install the bolts that hold the caliper to the fork.

If you have two front brakes, go to the side that has the hole through the axle. The hole should be aligned with the edge of the forks. Slip a 7/16 drill bit through that hole and make certain the bit just touches the edge of the forks. That is important for alignment of the brakes. If the drill bit does not touch the forks loosen the pinch bolt at the lowest end of the fork and slide the fork over until the drill bit touches. Tighten the pinch bolt to 30 lbs.

now tighten the bottom bolt that holds the caliper to the fork to 30lbs. then the top bolt to 30. Now you can tighten the pins that go through the caliper but be gentle, they only need 16 foot pounds of torque. That barely registers on most torque wrenches. If you have an inch pound wrench tighten to 200 inch pounds.

now you will need to pump the brake lever multiple times to get the new pads to come out and make contact with the rotor. When the brake lever feels firm that means the caliper is pinching the rotor correctly.
Check the front brake fluid reservoir and top it off if it is low.

That should do it.

Jun 17, 2010 | 2004 Harley Davidson FLHRCI Road King...

1 Answer

FRONT BRAKE PADS 200 VN 750, HELP PLEASE!


hi matt,not that hard to do,undo the two bolts holding the caliper onto the fork leg,slide the caliper off the disc,there could be two ways of getting the pads out,there could be a cover over the caliper obscuring the pads if this is the case simply remove the cover to expose the disc pads,the pads are normally held in by either spring clips or two long pins that go from one side of the caliper-through the disc pads and through to a reciever hole on the other side of the caliper,simply remove the pins(normally held in plce by a small "r" clip)slide the pins out and the pads are ready to remove,before you remove the pads push back the pistons i normally do it with a large bladed screwdriver between the pads and push the pistons back as far as you can,install the new pads and reassemble the pins/holder or retainer,do not use any grease or oil /lubricants to reassemble the caliper,if you do,when the pads heat up under normall use the lubricant will end up on the pads,causing failure,fit the caliper back onto the fork leg making sure there is one pad either side of the disc,it may be a tight fit,if they wont go on ,push the caliper pistons further back,once you have the caliper reinstalled on the fork leg tighten up the bolts that secure the caliper....this bit is critical.....operate the brake lever untill the lever firms up and you are 100%certain that the pads are now seated on the disc,i have seen people not do this and the results are normally quite painfull,this all sounds like an absolute major rebuild,but once you know the sequence it shouldnt take more than about 20mins to do the job from start to finish,hope this helps...cheers ian

Dec 27, 2009 | 2000 kawasaki VN 750 Vulcan

1 Answer

What does it take to change rear pads on a fxdli 04


The best way to do it is remove the rear tire and go about it that way. You can also do it (with quite abit of trouble) with the tire on.
Doing it tire on you need a screwdriver to press the pads to compress the brake pistons and you have to do it for both sides. Remove the 2 small (slide) bolts that hold the pads in place, keep note of which pad came from which side (in/ out). When reinstalling make sure to clean and lubricate with anti-seize the slide bolts, torque down till you hear a clicking sound. pump the brakes (VERY IMPORTANT) before you take it for a test ride

Aug 31, 2009 | 2004 Harley Davidson FXDL - FXDLI Dyna Low...

1 Answer

How do i install new brake pads on my gsxr 750 and how diffacult is it is it anything like a car


It quite simple. Loosen the recessed hex bolt that secures the pads but dont remove. Then remove the two bolts holding the caliper to the fork leg and slide away from the disc. Remove the recessed hex bolt and old pads and fit new pads in same fashion as the old pads. You may need to push back the pistons to fit the thicker new pads, be careful not to damage the pistons.

Read the manual for any other problems. Good luck.
http://www.carlsalter.com/download.asp?fileid=083117122117107105095071083088045082055053048095050048048048045050048048050095083101114118105099101095077097110117097108046112100102

May 16, 2009 | 2000 Suzuki GSX-R 750

1 Answer

Ducati 749 Brake Judder?


Plenty of tales about warped discs to go with that one, but it seems that it can be fouled-up disc mounting bobbins - the dust and crud get in and stop them from "floating". try a small bolt thru the bobbin with a nut to lock it, then spin it while spraying with brake cleaner (or soapy water) and you'll free the bobbins off thus restoring the flex and float.....worked for me. Quite a bit of dust and muck come out....try grasping the disc and see if it does actually float on the bobbins before and after

Nov 20, 2008 | 2005 Ducati 749 Dark

1 Answer

Pads problem


the front brakes work spectacularly. After a while or on a hot day when the bike slows to say 20mph and the front brakes are applied the front brakes chatter very much like the rotor is warped (continuous, pretty consistent skipping). This is not seen in the cool mornings even at low speed. Since I just pulled the front wheel off for a tire change, I loosened and re-torqued all the rotor bolts to spec, hoping this would resolve the issue; I haven't had a chance to ride it since the change. Anyone have any thoughts on what might be happening? Could the rotors be perfectly flat/straight until they heat up, and then warp? If so, I presume my only option is to replace them, but how do I avoid this situation in the future? What are some possible causes?,Your pads got glazed,,,

Nov 10, 2008 | 2004 Hartford VR 150H

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