Question about 2007 Husaberg FS 550 e

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Chain How often do I need to check the chain’s tension? How?

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Every 600 miles or 1000 km. Your motorcycle’s Owner’s Manual will have directions. You need to check the tension at several points along the chain’s travel around the engine and wheel sprockets. The tension should be set so that the loosest spot and the tightest spot are still within the slack tolerance specified in the owner’s manual. If the tightest spot is at the tightest allowed and the loosest is beyond the tolerance then it’s time to get a new chain and sprocket set. ,

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

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I tightened my chain on my 04 r6 and after I tightened everything back up I can barey roll it in neutral when I'm sitting on it. Can you over tighten the rear axle nut?


YES, and you set the chain tension with - Countershaft sprocket centerline, the swingarm bolt centerline, and the rear axle nut centerline - ALL THREE IN A STRAIGHT LINE....Use a yardstick to make sure they are IN LINE!!! Have one of your fat buddies sit on it while you adjust the chain. Make sure the chain runs IN A STRAIGHT LINE regardless of the marks on the chain tensioners!!!!!!!! I have always loosened the chain a lot, kicking the tire forward so when I CORRECTLY adjust the chain it is MUCH EASIER to make sure the chain is in straight line (you should remove the chain guard so you can see the chain), do it slowly, rotating the tire while watching the chain, making sure IT RUNS TRUE!! - Forget the alignment marks!!... then slowly get the tension correct (with your fat buddy sitting on it).. remember what 3 things HAVE to be in a straight line... snug the tensioners good - NOW tighten the axle...do not over tighten. THEN finish snugging down the chain tensioners. reinstall the chain guard. Double check the axle nut!!!!

Chain tension done professionally!!!

Jul 25, 2014 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

Bike chain


With a chain splitter! It's a good idea to change the front and rear sprockets too so buy the lot when you're buying the chain. Loosen the tension on the chain tensioners on the rear wheel. Split the links. Remove chain. Remove and replace sprockets. Replace chain and be sure to use a chain riveter to sort out the joint. Don't be tempted to use a split link as your bike is too big and powerful for one. Adjust your chain tension checking for tight spots etc. Apply lube and enjoy!

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1 Answer

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Instructions
    • 1 Measure the chain's tension with a ruler. Move the center point of the bottom half of the drive chain with your hand. Take a measurement of the chain's movement as you push the chain up and down as far as it will go. The chain should have a free range of movement between 0.8 to 1.2 inches. If the chain's free range is greater than 1.2 inches, you need to tighten the chain. Alternatively, loosen the chain if it has less than 0.8 inches of free movement.
    • 2 Loosen the large nut on the left side of the rear axle with a 32 mm socket and a socket wrench. If more leverage is needed to loosen the nut, use a long-handled breaker bar.
    • 3 Loosen the chain adjuster blocks on both side of the rear swing arm with a pair of 10 mm wrenches. Hold the blocks' adjustment bolt's head steady with one wrench and loosen the bolt's lock nut with the other wrench.
    • 4 Turn both adjustment bolts an equal number of turns with a 10 mm wrench to adjust the chain's tension. Turn the adjustment bolts clockwise to loosen the chain, or counterclockwise to tighten the chain. Check that the edge of both chain adjuster blocks are evenly aligned with the adjustment marks imprinted on the swing arm.
    • 5 Check the chain's range of free movement again. Make adjustments as needed until the chain has a free range of movement between 0.8 and 1.2 inches.
    • 6 Hold the adjustment bolts steady with a 10 mm wrench and tighten their lock nuts against the chain adjuster blocks with a second 10 mm wrench. Tighten the axle nut to 72.5 foot-pounds with a 32 mm socket and a torque wrench. Check the chain's tension again.

Jan 15, 2013 | 2004 Suzuki GSX-R 750

1 Answer

I hear a clunking fron the front chain sprocket . I think the chain needs adjusted on my 1995 kawaski zx1100.


Get the rear wheel off the ground and adjust the chain tension. When checking the tension spin the rear wheel and check that the tension does not go slack or get tighter. If the chain is riding up and down the sprocket teeth then the chain is stretched and needs to be replaced. This is the grinding/clunking noise you are hearing. If the sprockets are worn consider a chain and sprocket set, it can be a less expensive option than buying the parts separately.

Sep 19, 2010 | kawasaki ZZR 1100 Motorcycles

1 Answer

Vt500 c ticking sound. Cam chain tensioners pretty sure its the cam chain tensioner springs. lost their spring If its been making this noise for a while what else would i need to replace. cam...


You have a self adjusting cam chain tensioner. It is sold as an assembly. Take out the complete unit and replace it with a new one. The springs are not bad , the device that keeps the pressure on the tensioner is slipping causing a ticking sound.

May 16, 2010 | 1985 Honda VT 500 C Shadow

1 Answer

Timing chain slip how do you get the timimg back front head


you will need to release tensioner, and remove inlet camshaft and re align at TDC then put cam back in and tension.
timing chain cannot just slip check for chain, guides, or tensioner wear

Apr 11, 2010 | 2000 Honda VTR 1000 F Firestorm

1 Answer

Need to tighten the timing chain


It has an automatic cam chain tensioner. If you are getting cam chain rattle, I would look at worn guides/chain.

Jul 22, 2009 | 1996 Honda VT 1100 C2 Shadow Sabre

1 Answer

Timming chain adjustment


Most likely you have anautomatic cam chain tensioner, which cannot be tensioned, and the only remedy is to replace the cam chain (if it's stretched). If, however, you have a manualy adjusted cam chain tensioner (highly unlikely), you have to look up the tensioning value in your workshop manual.

Jun 13, 2009 | 1986 Yamaha FZ 600

1 Answer

Chain


Every 600 miles or 1000 km. Your motorcycle’s Owner’s Manual will have directions. You need to check the tension at several points along the chain’s travel around the engine and wheel sprockets. The tension should be set so that the loosest spot and the tightest spot are still within the slack tolerance specified in the owner’s manual. If the tightest spot is at the tightest allowed and the loosest is beyond the tolerance then it’s time to get a new chain and sprocket set. ,

Nov 10, 2008 | 2004 Hartford Legion HD-150L

1 Answer

Chain's tension


Every 600 miles or 1000 km. Your motorcycle’s Owner’s Manual will have directions. You need to check the tension at several points along the chain’s travel around the engine and wheel sprockets. The tension should be set so that the loosest spot and the tightest spot are still within the slack tolerance specified in the owner’s manual. If the tightest spot is at the tightest allowed and the loosest is beyond the tolerance then it’s time to get a new chain and sprocket set. ,

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