Question about 2003 HM CRE 125

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Caliper/piston i am recently changing my rear break pads but in order to fit the new ones on i need the piston on the caliper to move back into the caliper body so i can install the new and much thicker break pads. the problem: i cant get the piston back into the caliper far enough to make room for the new ones. I tried pushing and twisting it back in but it wont budge. What do i need to do?

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Take the cap off the master cylinder. Suck out all the fluid. Then gently pry apart the piston(s). When done replace the fluid or better yet bleed/flush the entire system. Replace the cap, and go ride. ,,,

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

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How to replace rear brake pads 2002 softtail ?


If present, remove right saddlebag.
Remove the rear master cylinder reservoir cap. As the pistons are pushed back into the caliper, fluid level may rise more than 1/8 in. (3.2 mm). You may have to remove fluid to allow for this.
Loosen, but do not remove, both pad pins (12 pt/0.25 in.).
Pry the inside pad back. Use steady pressure to prevent scoring the brake disc. Pry between the pad and the brake disc in order to push the caliper pistons back into their bores.
Once the pistons have been fully retracted into their bores, pull pad pins part way until the inside pads drop free. Note the pad's original orientation for replacement purposes.
Install pad with two tabs on the inboard side of the rear caliper.
Install new inside brake pad using the same orientation as the pad previously removed. Curved portion of pad must face upward.
Install pad pins until the pins snap into place with an audible click. Do not fully tighten at this time.
Pump brake pedal lever to move inside pistons out until they contact inside brake pads.
Pry the outside pad back. Pry between the pad and the brake disc in order to push the caliper pistons back into their bores.
Verify that inside pads are captured between brake disc and pistons. Completely remove pad pins to free outside brake pad. Note the pad's original orientation for replacement purposes.
Install new outside brake pad using the same orientation as the pad previously removed. If the inside pad moved during the previous step, reinstall. Curved portion of pad must face upward.
Install both pad pins through holes in inner and outer
brake pads. Tighten to 180-200 in-lbs (20.3-22.6 Nm).

Jun 03, 2014 | 2003 Harley Davidson FXST Softail Standard

1 Answer

How do i change rear brakes pads on a 2002 hd fxdwg ?


DO NOT REMOVE THE WHEEL AND DO NOT SPLIT THE CALIPER.

After servicing the brakes in any way and before moving the motorcycle always pump the brakes to build brake system pressure and move the pistons and pads out against the brake rotor.

First remove the rear master cylinder reservoir cap and check the fluid level because as the pistons are pushed back into the caliper the fluid level will rise and you do not want it to overflow the reservoir and spill out and to avoid this you must remove sufficient fluid.
Second, loosen, but do not remove, both pad pins with a 12 point .025 inch socket wrench.
Thirdly pry the inside pad back using steady pressure and a sturdy scraper or large screw driver or similar suitable tool, prying between the pad and the brake disc in order to push the caliper pistons back into their bores.
Fourthly, once the pistons have been fully retracted into their bores, pull the pad pins out part way only until the inside pads drop free.Do not completely pull the pad pins out from the caliper at this time because completely removing the pad pins at this time will cause you unnecessary difficulty during re-assembly. ALSO carefully note and remember each pad's original orientation for so you can put the new pads into the correct position and orientation in the caliper. Note that the front left, and the front right (if the front right is present) and all of the rear brake calipers use the same exact brake pad set. Install the pad with two tabs on the inboard side of the rear caliper.
Fifthly install the new inside brake pad using the same orientation as the pad previously removed (with the curved portion of the pad facing the rear of the motorcycle.
Sixthly install the pad pins until the pins snap into place with an audible click but do not fully tighten them at this time.
Next pump the brake pedal lever to move the inside pistons out until they contact the inside brake pads and then pry the outside pad back to push the caliper pistons back into their bores and verify that the inside pads have been captured between the brake disc and the pistons. At this point you can completely remove the pad pins to free the outside brake pad. Again note the pad's original orientation for replacement purpose and orientation
.While the pad pins are out inspect them for grooving and wear and measure the pin diameter in an unworn area, and then in the area of any grooving or wear, and if wear is more than 0.015 in. (0.38mm), replace both pins.
THEN install the new outside brake pad using the same orientation as the pad previously removed and if the inside pad moved during the previous step, reinstall it with the curved portion of the pad facing the rear of motorcycle.
THEN install both pad pins through holes in the inner and outer brake pads and tighten them to 180-200 in-lbs which is (20.3-22.6 Nm).
THEN pump the brake pedal to move the pistons out until they contact both of the brake pads and verify the correct piston location against the pads.
THEN check the brake fluid level in master cylinder and fill it up to the correct level if necessary using ONLY D.O.T. 5 SILICONE BRAKE, install the master cylinder reservoir cap and tighten the reservoir cap screws to 6-8
in-lbswhich is (0.7-0.9 Nm).
WHEN the bike is completely back together test the brakes at low speed in a safe area and also confirm that the brake light works properly and if the brakes feel at all spongy bleed them properly until a hard not spongy brake pedal is obtained. AND avoid making hard stops for the first 100 miles (160 km) to allow the new pads to condition to the brake rotors.

May 10, 2014 | Harley Davidson Motorcycles

1 Answer

Changing rear brake pads on a 2011 tri glide ultra classic


A TriGlide's rear brakes are quite different from a two-wheeled Ultra, which seems to be what everyone has been talking about. In order to change the pads:
While the bike is on the ground, break the lug nuts loose on both sides. Release the parking brake. Then lift the bike so that the rear tires are far enough off the ground that you can take a rear tire off and get it out from under the fender.
Start with the left rear tire, as it is the furthest away from the master cylinder. With the tire out of the way, you can see the caliper. You'll see a lever on the caliper for the parking brake on the inboard side of the caliper. There is n Ny-Lock type nut on the lever shaft. Remove the nut and lever, and back the bolt out. The bolt is what applies pressure to the caliper piston when you set the parking brake, and if it isn't backed out enough, it will prevent you from pushing the piston sufficiently to put the new pads in.
There are two bolts in the caliper that capture the pads. Remove the bolts and pads. You can use one of the pads and a C-clamp to now push the piston in. Or, you may be able to push the piston in by hand.
While you have the caliper off, there is a bushing on the top and bottom that allows the caliper to self-center as the pads wear. They should move in and out of the caliper housing with a little resistance. It's a good idea to check them, and take them out and clean and lubricate them with a thin coat of anti-sieze and reinstall. If they have a lot of corrosion on them, you may want to replace.
It's also recommended that you bleed the brakes, as the brake fluid has a tendency to absorb moisture over time. As the fluid gets hot, the water will cause bubbles to form, and you'll loose stopping power. (Don't try to bleed the brakes until the pads and caliper have been reinstalled and bolted in over the rotor)
Install the new pads, and reinstall the caliper. The pad kit you bought from H-D should have new bolts to put in the caliper for the parking brake, so replace the bolt, running it in far enough so you feel it contacting the piston. Put the lever back on so that it is resting against the stop on the caliper in the fully released position, and put a new Ny-Lock nut on that should have come in the kit.
Now bleed the brake line. Keep bleeding until clear fluid flows, being sure you don't introduce air into the line.
When everything has been tightened to the proper torque, put the tire and lug nuts back on. Repeat for the right side.
Once you've got everything back together, back off the adjustment on the parking brake lever, and then set the brake. If the brakes don't hold when you push the bike, release the lever and tighten the adjustment. Repeat until the brakes hold the bike. Make sure you tighten the set screw the holds the lever adjustment in position.
You should then be good to go. Be sure to wash down any brake fluid that may have dripped, as it will ruin paint finishes.

Aug 02, 2012 | 2011 Harley Davidson FLHTCUTG Tri Glide...

1 Answer

HOW TO VIDEO TO CHANGE REAR BREAK PADS ON 2008 HONDA GOLDWING


There are two ways to change the rear pads on the GL1800.
One way takes about 15 minutes, the other about 1 hour.

The first way: Place the motorcycle on the main stand. Gently compress the pistons back into the caliper using a large - flat bladed screw driver between the rotor and old pad. Prior to doing this, I recommend using compressed air to clear the brake dust and then spraying the caliper pistons well with brake cleaner. This helps prevent any of the three pistons from sticking.

Next, remove the small black rubber plug on the caliper and then remove the 5-mm pin securing the brake pads in place. The brake pads should fall out of the caliper when the pin is removed. Set the new pads into the caliper, insuring they are setting all the way in the caliper and then reinstall the 5-mm pin, using caution to not over tighten it. While the pins are out you may want to coat the threads with a dab of lubricant to reduce corrosion so they will come out easily the next time.

Now, for the second way, visit this website.
http://www.pbase.com/fredharmon/rearbrakes

Jun 17, 2012 | 2008 Honda GL 1800 Gold wing Deluxe

1 Answer

How do you replace rear brakes on 2000 electra-glide standard


remove right side saddle bag, remove 2 screws to release brake caliper from caliper bracket. remove caliper from brake disc. caution do not operate brake pedal with caliper removed. slowley push the 2 caliper piston back so new pads will fit on rotor. also buy pads from harley much better than after market install in reverse order torque caliper to 75 -100 inch lbs. and caliper bolts to
43-48 ft lbs.

Aug 15, 2011 | 2004 Harley Davidson FLHT - FLHTI Electra...

1 Answer

Have 99 fxst- rear caliper will not lift off when bolts removed. I was told to remove rear wheel. can you help. thanks, CD


If you're trying to replace the pads, you shouldn't have to remove the rear wheel. Now. Sometimes Harley plays tricks on the owners and the mechanics. If it's approaching a "year change" and they run out of parts for the current year, they'll go ahead and switch to the later year model parts. In other words, your '99 model may have 2000 year model brakes on it.

Now, since I can't see the bike, all I have to go by is a few books. If this is the case, I won't know it so I'll have try something else. Look at the rear caliper. If look "inside" of the caliper you'll see the two pads. Are the two pads held in by two pins that run horizonally though the caliper halves and the pads? If so, you have the newer four piston calipers. If you've taken any bolts out of this caliper, the caliper is probably trying to split into two pieces. If this is the case, replace the bolts and tighten the well. Then, using a punch, drive the two pins out the backside of the caliper. There should be a metal piece that is an anti-rattle spring that will come out. Use a large screwdriver inserted between the rotor and the pad to gently pry the pad and the two pistons on the that side back into the caliper. Leave that screwdriver in there and use another to pry the pad and pistons on the other side back. Don't get too aggressive when doing this. The pistons move slowly just put enough pressure on the old pad so that the piston move into the caliper. If you don't do this, you will not be able to get the new pads in. Once you have the piston fully compressed into the caliper, lift the old pads out and drop the new pads in with the fiber side towards the rotor. Install the anti-rattle spring and the two pins. I would be a good idea to bleed the brakes and make sure you have a full firm pedal before you ride the bike.

If you don't see the pads or pins, you have the earlier dual piston caliper. Once you have the two bolts out, you may have to "rock" the caliper inward and outward a bit to compress the pistons back into the caliper a bit and break them loose from the pads. Once you get the caliper off, use a large C-clamp or a large pair of slip joint pliers to compress the pistons all the way into the caliper. Use some rags or thin wooden pieces to protect the paint and finish on your caliper. Remove the old pads and replace them with the fiber side towards the rotor. Put the caliper back on and tighten the bolts. Depress the rear brake pedal a few times until you get a full pedal. You may wish to bleed the brakes a bit to ensure there is no air in the system. Make sure you have a full firm pedal before you ride the bike and that the brakes work properly.

If you still cannot get the caliper off, I would suggest that you take the bike to a qualified mechanic since something else may be wrong. Brakes is THE ONE THING YOU DON'T WANT TO TAKE A CHANCE ON. If your bike quits, you pull off the road and get mad. If your brakes don't work when you need them, you get hurt or worse. If you experience anymore problems, let a qualified mechanic have a look at them.

Good Luck
Steve

Nov 21, 2010 | 2000 Harley Davidson FXST Softail Standard

1 Answer

How to change the brakes on 1996 yamaha royal star


Hooo..this is gonna be a long one. Hope you either have a laptop you can take to the bike, or you can print this.

Make sure you have an adequate supply of DOT 4 brake fluid. A quart should be enough, but much less is gonna leave you without brakes somewhere until you can get more. You CAN NOT refill with DOT 5 fluid; flushing the lines with alcohol, drying and purging is required before that change - and the benefits are negligible.

If you have the Royal Star, not the Deluxe, ignore the next paragraph.

Remove the saddlebag on the right side of the bike. Sound simple? NOT! There are two different length screws (three shorter, one long), a spacer, a variety of stand-offs, and a variety of rubber isolators and washers. Remove the parts (two mounts in the floor, two in the back toward the frame) but KEEP TRACK of where they come from, and in what order you remove them.

The rear caliper is now exposed - the real fun begins. Two bolts hold the caliper to the caliper arm - remove them and lay the caliper on the arm. Remove the black plastic dust cover on the top of the caliper (it's frequently missing, the ears that snap into slots in the caliper get brittle, and it breaks off and disappears), but DON'T try to remove the spring beneath. Lay the caliper on its side, pads toward you. Collapse the pistons (if you don't know how to do that, shame on you. Get a stack of pennies and a large screwdriver, stack pennies IN THE CENTER of one pad until there is very little clearance between the two pads with the screwdriver inserted between the pennies and the bare pad. Twist screwdriver HARD, relax. Keep adding pennies and twisting until neither pad will move any more).

It's time now for final disassembly. Flip the caliper over; you'll see two pins secured by spring clips. Those pins also secure the spring; note the orientation of the spring through the pins, take pictures or draw the assembly; whatever you do, make sure the springs and pins are reinstalled in EXACTLY the same orientation. Remove spring clips, remove pins and springs, and the pads can be removed one at a time by sliding to the center of the caliper. Insert new pads, reinstall pins, spring and spring clips, remount caliper, reinstall dust cap and bleed brakes. Pat yourself on the back now if it was a Royal Star - if it's a Deluxe, you've still got to wrestle the bag back into place. You can now reassure yourself (and any observers/kibitzers) that the worst caliper of the three is out of the way.

Proceed to the front, and pick a caliper. You'll see two (usually black) bolts holding the caliper to the front fork, remove them and swing the caliper free of the disk. The caliper itself closely resembles the one in the back with two notable exceptions - in addition to the spring on top of the pads, there are two retainers on the front and rear of the pads (they keep debris from getting between the pads and disk, and keep the pads from moving back and forth in the caliper housing), and on the back of the outside pad is a shim (don't ask me why, but it's usually there). disassembly and reassembly and reassembly are similar to the rear caliper BUT; remember to transfer the outside shim to the new pad, and , once the pistons are collapsed, remove the retainers from the front and rear of the old pads, then reinstall in the new pads prior to installing the pins and spring above the pads. After you've finished both calipers, bleed one caliper at a time.

Check the firmness of the brakes one more time, and it's Michelob time!

Jun 21, 2010 | 1996 Yamaha Royal Star XVZ 1300 A

1 Answer

How to change front and back brakes on a 2001 yamaha royal star motorcycle


Make sure you have an adequate supply of DOT 4 brake fluid. A quart should be enough, but much less is gonna leave you without brakes somewhere until you can get more. You CAN NOT refill with DOT 5 fluid; flushing the lines with alcohol, drying and purging is required before that change - and the benefits are negligible.

Remove the saddlebag on the right side of the bike. Sound simple? NOT! There are two different length screws (three shorter, one long), a spacer, a variety of stand-offs, and a variety of rubber isolators and washers. Remove the parts (two mounts in the floor, two in the back toward the frame) but KEEP TRACK of where they come from, and in what order you remove them.

The rear caliper is now exposed - the real fun begins. Two bolts hold the caliper to the caliper arm - remove them and lay the caliper on the arm. Remove the black plastic dust cover on the top of the caliper (it's frequently missing, the ears that snap into slots in the caliper get brittle, and it breaks off and disappears), but DON'T try to remove the spring beneath. Lay the caliper on its side, pads toward you. Collapse the pistons (if you don't know how to do that, shame on you. Get a stack of pennies and a large screwdriver, stack pennies IN THE CENTER of one pad until there is very little clearance between the two pads with the screwdriver inserted between the pennies and the bare pad. Twist screwdriver HARD, relax. Keep adding pennies and twisting until neither pad will move any more).

It's time now for final disassembly. Flip the caliper over; you'll see two pins secured by spring clips. Those pins also secure the spring; note the orientation of the spring through the pins, take pictures or draw the assembly; whatever you do, make sure the springs and pins are reinstalled in EXACTLY the same orientation. Remove spring clips, remove pins and springs, and the pads can be removed one at a time by sliding to the center of the caliper. Insert new pads, reinstall pins, spring and spring clips, remount caliper, reinstall dust cap and bleed brakes. Wrestle the saddle bag back into place. You can now reassure yourself (and any observers/kibitzers) that the worst caliper of the three is out of the way.

Proceed to the front, and pick a caliper. You'll see two (usually black) bolts holding the caliper to the front fork, remove them and swing the caliper free of the disk. The caliper itself closely resembles the one in the back with two notable exceptions - in addition to the spring on top of the pads, there are two retainers on the front and rear of the pads (they keep debris from getting between the pads and disk, and keep the pads from moving back and forth in the caliper housing), and on the back of the outside pad is a shim (don't ask me why, but it's usually there). Disassembly and reassembly are similar to the rear caliper BUT; remember to transfer the outside shim to the new pad, and, once the pistons are collapsed, remove the retainers from the front and rear of the old pads, then reinstall in the new pads prior to installing the pins and spring above the pads. After you've finished both calipers, bleed one caliper at a time.

Check the firmness of the brakes once more just for safetys' sake, and it's Miller time!

Apr 27, 2010 | 2001 Yamaha Royal Star Venture

1 Answer

Just changed the rear tire and need help getting the rear break back on 1999 heritage softtail


If you have the wheel properly installed, putting the rear brake back on the bike should not be a problem. The brake caliper bracket should act as the wheel spacer on the right side of the bike and must be properly positioned in order to get the axle back in.

With the caliper bracket on the bike, make sure the brake pads are properly positioned in the caliper bracket. Double check to see that the pads are not installed backwards, especially on the back side of the rotor. Carefully, slide the caliper down over the pads, without distrurbing them, and into the caliper bracket. If this is giving you a problem, you may have to press the piston in the caliper back into the the caliper just a bit to clear the pads. If you replaced the pads with new pads, press the piston all the way back into the caliper. I usually use a large pair of slip joint pliers or a large C-clamp to do this with. Make sure you put a rag or something around the caliper to protect the paint. Good Luck!

Dec 27, 2009 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLSTC Heritage...

1 Answer

How to fix rear brake pads on a BMW 1150RT have fitted new pads and they seem to be to binding on the disc


You'll have to disassemble it and move your piston in and out of the caliper to make sure it gets full stroke. Sounds like it's not compressing all the way into the caliper. Also some break fluids can expand, You may try bleeding it down a little first.

Oct 09, 2009 | 2004 BMW R 1150 RT (ABS)

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