Question about 2005 Hartford HD-125S

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Smoke There is an excess smoke from the exhaust.

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Check petrol quality. Check oil level. If found to be reducing on use visit the nearest Authorised Service Station since it could be due to piston and bore problem.,

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

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What is the cause of water dripping out exhaust pipe and engine smoking excessively?


Cold weather right? Dripping is the water condensing from the exhaust gases. The "smoke" is more than likely water vapor, just like your breath in cold weather. If you have smoke (black) in warmer weather, you have an excess fuel problem and won't pass emmision tests. If blue smoke you have oil leaks into the coubustion chamber. Also will not pass emmisions test.

Mar 04, 2015 | 2003 Ford Explorer

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I'm looking to purchase a used car. I've been doing online research and saw this webpage http://www.usedcarsmells.com . They talk about exhaust color and smells. Is it true that you could tell a lot about...


Yes this is correct, you can get important information from the colour of smoke from the exhaust:

Blue/Gray Smoke: Blue/gray exhaust smoke is an indication of oil burning in the combustion chamber. These are possible symptoms and causes:
Valve Seals: Leaking valve seals will cause blue/gray smoke at startup because oil leaks past the seals into the cylinder after the engine shuts down.
Valve Guides: Excessive clearance between the valve stem and the valve guide allows oil to leak past the gap into the cylinder.
Piston Rings: Worn or damaged piston rings will cause blow-by resulting in blue/gray smoke.
Worn Cylinder Walls: Worn cylinder walls cause blow-by resulting in blue/gray smoke.
PCV System: A stuck closed PCV valve will cause excessive crankcase pressure resulting in blue/gray smoke.
Black Smoke: Black exhaust smoke is an indication of a rich fuel condition. These are possible causes:
Fuel Injectors: A leaking or dripping fuel injector will cause a rich fuel condition.
Fuel Pressure Regulator: A stuck closed fuel pressure regulator will cause a rich fuel condition.
Fuel Return: A restricted fuel return line will cause a rich fuel condition.
White/Gray Smoke: White exhaust smoke is an indication that coolant is burning in the combustion chamber. These are possible causes:
Cylinder Head: A crack in the cylinder head (around the coolant jacket) will cause coolant to enter the combustion chamber.
Engine Block: A crack in the deck of an engine block near the coolant jacket will cause coolant to enter the combustion chamber.
Head Gasket: A damaged or blown head gasket will cause coolant to enter the combustion chamber resulting in white/gray smoke coming from the tailpipe.

Jan 17, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

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Why is my 2000 kia sephia blowing blue smoke from the tailpipe. it has 86,000 miles. the check oil warning light is on even though the dipstick reads full.


The most common cause of blue exhaust smoke is oil leaking past engine seals and into the cylinders where it then mixes and burns with the fuel. This is most frequently seen in older or high mileage cars with worn seals and gaskets. It only requires a very small amount of oil leaking into the cylinders to cause excessive blue exhaust smoke.

Blue exhaust smoke only at start-up can indicate worn piston seals or damaged or worn valve guides which may also cause a rattling noise. An external engine oil leak can drip onto hot engine and exhaust parts causing what appears to be blue exhaust smoke. Other possible causes of blue exhaust smoke include: piston wear, worn valve seals, a dirty or non-functioning PCV valve, worn piston rings, an intake manifold gasket leak, worn engine oil seals and possibly even head gasket failure.

Oil leaking into the cylinders can cause a rough idle, misfire and fouled spark plugs. In addition, a reduction in power and oil loss can be indicators that the blue exhaust smoke is caused by an internal engine oil leak. Internal engine oil leaks can also allow fuel to mix with the oil in the crankcase which will degrade the oil and prevent it from adequately protecting the engine.

Operating a car with a severely dirty oil filter, air filter or improperly functioning PCV valve can also sometimes result in engine oil blow-by, oil loss and blue exhaust smoke. Periodically checking the engine oil level with the oil dip stick will indicate if there is excessive oil consumption. Higher viscosity engine oil can sometimes temporarily reduce the amount of blow-by; however, this is not generally recommended. Excessive blue exhaust smoke indicates a possible internal engine oil leak that should be inspected by an ASE certified mechanic.

Dec 08, 2014 | 2000 Kia Sephia

1 Answer

When first starting up smoke comes from exhaust and makes a loud noise


Black smoke is excess unburnt fuel. Blue smoke is oil being burned, if blue the valve stem seals may be allowing oil to seep down over night.

Dec 31, 2013 | Peugeot Partner Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

EXHAUST TROUBLE SHOOTING


If smoke is black indicates too much fuel
If smoke is white Could be coolant in the exhaust system
If smoke is blue possible excessive oil entering in the combustion system
Also if you have an automatic transmission with a vacuum modulator, it could be leaking transmission into the combustion
If you have too much oil in the engine, it will also smoke

May 06, 2013 | 2007 Honda Accord Sedan

1 Answer

Excess smoke from exhaust


I would make sure the oil level is not too high. Next I would remove a spark plug and test compression to see whether your rings are worn excessively.Hope this helps.

Jan 08, 2012 | Yamaha DT 125 R Motorcycles

1 Answer

Excess smoke


The general rule: white-ish smoke indicates coolant in the exhaust, meaning a blown head gasket, whereas darker smoke indicates motor oil in the exhaust, which means that one (or more) cylinders have a broken ring, and the engine needs a ring job.
Fix for white smoke: replace head gasket.
Fix for black smoke: ring job.

Oct 05, 2011 | 2003 Lexus ES 300

1 Answer

My 93 has ton of engine smoke, why is that?


what color is the smoke??

Guide to smoke color
are few exceptions here but for most part

Blue smoke -burning oil- bad rings or bad valve guides

White smoke a little is normal after start up (condensation in exhaust pipes) large amounts - blown head gaskets

Black Smoke - running excessively rich

Nov 22, 2010 | 1993 Mazda RX-7

1 Answer

2000 Volvo V70 2.5 TDI excessive black exhaust smoke


black smoke( too much gas)
blue smoke( burning too much oil)
white smoke( burning coolant)

Apr 20, 2009 | 1998 Volvo V70

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