Question about 2006 Enfield Bullet 350

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Saddlebags What's the difference between how detachable and non-detachable saddlebags fasten to the rails on a Bullet? How easily do they go on and off? How difficult for non-detachables to go on and off? Some saddlebags sets are connected in the middle and do they need to be fastened to the bike under a seat or rack?

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I bought some cheapo leather bags off ebay that just hung over the seat/fended and tied off to the rails on the bike. I unbolted my stock seat and put them across the fender underneath and they worked well. When I changed to a solo seat that setup did not look all that good so I cut the web between the two bags and attacked them to the rails using rubberized clamps I got in the plumbing section at ACE hardware. I don't really like having saddle bags on the bike as far as looks but its nice to be able to carry a pump rain suitsbungie cords , tools and various other things with ease. Of course these are not readily removable but that can be a good thing. I kinda would like canvas bags with removable clip action to attach them to the bike, but I went cheap. ,,,

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

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Remove rear wheel on 2012 flhtc harley


To remove a 2012 TOURING rear wheel FIRST remove the saddlebags, then raise the wheel with a suitable lifting device and rotate the wheel and inspect the wheel bearings. THEN remove left side muffler, on models equipped with low profile shock absorbers (FLHX, FLTRX), remove the left side lower saddlebag support rail and if ABS equipped remove the cable strap to releasethe rear wheel speed sensor cable from the rear brake hose and at no time ever left any magnetic force field exist or be close to the speed sensor or it will be ruined, remove the rear brake caliper but do not disconnect the brake hose, set the brake caliper on the passenger footboard or otherwise appropriately support it, remove the E-clip from the groove at the end of the axle, hold the weld nut on the left side of the axle and loosen the cone nut on the right side of the axle using an AXLE NUT TORQUE ADAPTER available from JIM's or H-D (HD- 47925), remove the cone nut and the adjuster cam from the axle, rotate the weld nut on the left side of the axlecounterclockwise until the wheel is loose, remove the axle from the left side of the motorcycle, catch all of the external spacer(s), caliper bracket, and rear wheel speed sensor (if ABS equipped) as the axle is removed, remove the caliper bracket from the anchor weldment on the rear fork, move wheel forward enough so that you can and slip the drive belt off of the compensator sprocket, if needed remove the brake disc from hub and be careful that the drive sprocket does not fall off and get damaged as you remove the wheel from the bike, mark the wheel and the disc for re-installation in the same orientation.

To install a 2012 TOURING rear wheel you will need FASTENER TORQUE VALUEs. The brake disc (rear) screws are 30-45 ft-lbs 41-61 Nm; (Do not re-use brake disc/rotor screws because re-using these can result in torque loss and always reinstall a brake disc in its original orientation); the rear axle cone nut (preliminary - 15-20 ft-lbs 20-27 Nm) (Final 95 to 105 ft lbs 128.8-142.4 Nm ) ; Brake caliper (rear)mounting fasteners 43-48 ft-lbs 58.3-65.1 Nm. If the brake disc was removed from the wheel ALWAYS reinstall it in the same orientation with the wheel as when it was removed and ALWAYS use NEW attaching screws and tighten them in a crosswise pattern to 30-45 ft-lbs (41-61 Nm), verify that the sprocket is square to and fully seated in the bowl area of the wheel, place the wheel into the rear fork with the drive sprocket installed, install the belt over the drive sprocket and then slide the wheel back to take up the slack, seat the brake caliper bracket on the anchor weldment of the rear fork, apply a light coat of wheel bearing type grease (H-D suggest silver anti-seize compound but this technician finds almost all seized, corroded axles were lubricated thus so do as you feel best) to the axle to the bearing bores and to the bore of the spacer sleeve, slide the axle through the left side of rear fork, the thin external spacer, the sprocket and into the wheel hub out the other side of the wheel hub and through the rear wheel speed sensor if ABS equipped and if ABS equipped ensure that the grooves on the external spacer, or index pin on the rear wheel speed sensor are on the outboard side or through the thick external spacer if not ABS equipped, the brake caliper bracket, and the right side of the rear fork, rotate the axle so that the flat on the threaded end is topside and with the adjuster cam section forward, install the adjuster cam on the right end of the axle, apply a light coat of SILVER GRADE ANTI-SEIZE (H-D Part No. 98960-97) to the inboard side of the cone nut but NOT the threads, install the cone nut on axle finger tight only, if ABS equipped route the speed sensor cable forward and outboard of the brake caliper bracket, continue forward following the top of the rear fork, rotate the speed sensor in a counterclockwise direction until the index pin makes contact with the brake caliper bracket, tighten the cone nut to a preliminary torque of 15-20 ft lbs (20-27 Nm), install the brake caliper and tighten its screws to 43-48 ft-lbs (58.3-65.1 Nm), secure the rear wheel speed sensor cable to the brake hose with the conduit clip located approximately 1.25 in. (31.8mm) in front of the brake hose crimp, adjust the drive belt using a belt tension gauge, final tighten the cone nut to 95 to 105 ft lbs 128.8-142.4 Nm, install a new E-clip with the flat side out in groove on the right side of the axle, on models equipped with low profile shock absorbers, install the left side lower saddlebag support rail, install the left side muffler and tighten its fasteners to 96-144 in-lbs 10.9-16.3 Nm,depress the rear brake pedal a number of times to set the brake pads properly against the brake disc, install the saddlebags and THEN road test the vehicle.

May 28, 2014 | 2003 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

2 Answers

How can you get saddle bag open, that latch is screwed up?


The solution to this problem, unfortunately, will involve the destruction of two hinge pins; since the hinge is sold only as an assembly, the entire hinge will have to be replaced. I'm sorry about that, but I thought you ought to know that before you start the repair.

Look at each end of the hinge (on the outside of the bag); you will notice a hole and (it may take a flashlight to see it) the end of a hinge pin within. Those hinge pins will have to be driven toward the center of the hinge until the hinge halves separate; that's much less than an inch, but is SEEMS more like 30 feet. Use a nail set that fits loosely in the hole, or a hardened nail about the same size with the tip ground flat.

Once the hinge halves separate, you'll find that you can lift that side of the saddlebag cover only a very short distance; the nylon fabric hinge cover on the inside keeps the cover from opening more than a VERY few inches. The hinge cover is secured by 3mm hex bolts; use a 3mm allen wrench to remove the bolts and the saddlebag top should swing open far enough for you to get your hand inside.

Take a flashlight and examine high on the opposite side of the saddlebag, inside the bag just underneath the cover; there are two catches covered by a broad plastic shield. Use your 3mm allen to remove the plastic shield, then use a small socket to remove the bolts holding the catches to the bottom part of the saddlebag. You can now lift the top of the saddlebag off and reveal the bottom of the catch.

The cover of the catch is secured by 1/4-turn fasteners, you'll see the phillips-head slots. Turn the screwheads until all fasteners are obviously loose; the cover can then be removed. There is a bent catch actuator arm beneath; push the top (free end, well, actually MIDDLE) of the arm toward the outside of the saddlebag cover, and the catches you removed from the saddlebag can be freed and remounted on the saddlebag.

You'll see the bottom of the release button through the catch actuator assembly; push it out, back to its' normal position. You're likely to find one of two things wrong: the actuator arm (4XY-2841A-00-00) is bent or broken, the lock assembly (4XY-W2843-00-00) has a bent or broken actuator tab or lever. A bolt may also be missing from either the actuator arm or lock assemblies; that would typically cause misalignment or binding.

Replace the hinge, reassemble the saddlebag top with the appropriate repair parts, mount and take a nice, long ride to relieve the frustration.

Mar 18, 2010 | 2008 Yamaha Royal Star Venture

1 Answer

Can not get saddle bag open the lach is messed up and won't open


The solution to this problem, unfortunately, will involve the destruction of two hinge pins; since the hinge is sold only as an assembly, the entire hinge will have to be replaced. I'm sorry about that, but I thought you ought to know that before you start the repair.

Look at each end of the hinge (on the outside of the bag); you will notice a hole and (it may take a flashlight to see it) the end of a hinge pin within. Those hinge pins will have to be driven toward the center of the hinge until the hinge halves separate; that's much less than an inch, but is SEEMS more like 30 feet. Use a nail set that fits loosely in the hole, or a hardened nail about the same size with the tip ground flat.

Once the hinge halves separate, you'll find that you can lift that side of the saddlebag cover only a very short distance; the nylon fabric hinge cover on the inside keeps the cover from opening more than a VERY few inches. The hinge cover is secured by 3mm hex bolts; use a 3mm allen wrench to remove the bolts and the saddlebag top should swing open far enough for you to get your hand inside.

Take a flashlight and examine high on the opposite side of the saddlebag, inside the bag just underneath the cover; there are two catches covered by a broad plastic shield. Use your 3mm allen to remove the plastic shield, then use a small socket to remove the bolts holding the catches to the bottom part of the saddlebag. You can now lift the top of the saddlebag off and reveal the bottom of the catch.

The cover of the catch is secured by 1/4-turn fasteners, you'll see the phillips-head slots. Turn the screwheads until all fasteners are obviously loose; the cover can then be removed. There is a bent catch actuator arm beneath; push the top (free end, well, actually MIDDLE) of the arm toward the outside of the saddlebag cover, and the catches you removed from the saddlebag can be freed and remounted on the saddlebag.

You'll see the bottom of the release button through the catch actuator assembly; push it out, back to its' normal position. You're likely to find one of two things wrong: the actuator arm (4XY-2841A-00-00) is bent or broken, or the lock assembly (4XY-W2843-00-00) has a bent or broken actuator tab or lever. A bolt may also be missing from either the actuator arm or lock assemblies; that would typically cause misalignment or binding.

Replace the hinge, reassemble the saddlebag top with the appropriate repair parts, mount and take a nice, long ride to relieve the frustration.

Mar 17, 2010 | 2006 Yamaha Royal Star Venture

1 Answer

On Saddlebags for 86 Shadow VT500


You do need brackets OR solid bags. Standard brackets can be recommended by the shop where you purchase. The brackets keep the bags out of the wheel and off the fender. ( I really wanted the real leather ... but I settled for the synthetic leather. $400 difference)

You might pay a little more at the Honda shop but there will be no quibbling about this or that. They know your bike and what will fit.

You can buy at other motorcycle shops but the stuff at the Honda shop is there to fit Hondas.

Thanks for using FixYa.com

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Oct 28, 2009 | 1986 Honda VT 500 C Shadow

1 Answer

I have a 1990 Goldwing SE with 30K miles. I've added lighting to the saddlebag and replaced the rear reflector with a light. I've also converted the saddlebag corner brake lights to turn signal/brake...


the problem is in the conversion of the saddlebag brake lights. There is a wire that feeds the cruise control module from the rear brake lights. You will find the new brake light connector different from the old one. I would splice into the new brake light signal wire to the cruise control brake on signal wire

Aug 06, 2009 | 1989 Honda GL 1500 Gold Wing

1 Answer

My bullet,when start immediately getting too hot especially exhaust portion


Just see for the spark plug installed in properly fasten or tighten properly , see for that the spark plug gap is properly kept as per instructed by the manufacturer guideline, too low or high gap in spark plug may also result in for such problem, 2nd see for weather your bullet motorcycle is equipped with a CDI unit or a traditional deco system ignition system with delco point see for that if the bike come with delco point see for proper CV Point gap is kept as per the manufacture any thing else then just let me know.. see you...

Mar 23, 2009 | 2005 Enfield Bullet Sixty-5

1 Answer

I would like to install saddlebags on my 2005 Springer classic (FLSTSC). I am looking at the 90058-05 saddlebags. Will I need another kit or hardware to install the saddlebags? What is difference between...


Hi,
We ride the same bike as you and had the saddle bikes fitted when we first bought the bike new. Yes, you will definately need a fitting kit, you do with all the bags, however be very careful about what bags you buy. We have the original 'money bag' shaped bags which were particularly designed for the bike and to match the saddle. The were very expensive and were the biggest waste of money ever! They are so impractical if you have a set of wet gear in each side they are full to bursting and the small opening at the top makes them very awkward. Just last year Harley bought out a new, bigger, set, I don't know what the top opening is like but it has to be better than the ones we have, we are even considering swapping to the new ones as we tour quite a lot.
Hope this helps.

Mar 15, 2009 | 2005 Harley Davidson FLSTSC - FLSTSCI...

1 Answer

Saddlebags


I bought some cheapo leather bags off ebay that just hung over the seat/fended and tied off to the rails on the bike. I unbolted my stock seat and put them across the fender underneath and they worked well. When I changed to a solo seat that setup did not look all that good so I cut the web between the two bags and attacked them to the rails using rubberized clamps I got in the plumbing section at ACE hardware. I don't really like having saddle bags on the bike as far as looks but its nice to be able to carry a pump rain suitsbungie cords , tools and various other things with ease. Of course these are not readily removable but that can be a good thing. I kinda would like canvas bags with removable clip action to attach them to the bike, but I went cheap. ,,,

Nov 10, 2008 | 2001 Enfield Bullet 500

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