Question about 2000 Ducati 748 E- S (Biposto-Monoposto) - R

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Radial calipers I'm looking at some Cyclecat radial caliper adapters for my 748 (standard forks)

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And have found these. They are described as: .. designed to adapt forks having standard bottom configurations to facilitate the use of radial brake calipers. The kit is intended specifically for use with the Ohlins R&T forks and Ducati superbike models prior to the 749 and 999. So I take it they will fit. Then I've found some radial calipers from a 2007 S4R. Having done some searching of the forum I'm still very confused about fitment offests etc - and have seen one thread warning about using 65-100 something! Can anyone give me a quick answer - what would need to be done to make these fit, or what should I be looking for?,Radial caliper conversions cost a big chunk of change and in my humble opinion there are way cooler things you can spend money on for a base 748 like light wheels or good tires and a track day. Do you really need them? I personally don't see the need for radial calipers on a 748 even if you track your bike. Why not drop some cash on a good set of pads and a 19x20 radial master cylinder if its responsiveness and feel you're looking for?,,,

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

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SOURCE: Radial calipers

and have found these. They are described as: .. designed to adapt forks having standard bottom configurations to facilitate the use of radial brake calipers. The kit is intended specifically for use with the Ohlins R&T forks and Ducati superbike models prior to the 749 and 999. So I take it they will fit. Then I've found some radial calipers from a 2007 S4R. Having done some searching of the forum I'm still very confused about fitment offests etc - and have seen one thread warning about using 65-100 something! Can anyone give me a quick answer - what would need to be done to make these fit, or what should I be looking for?,Radial caliper conversions cost a big chunk of change and in my humble opinion there are way cooler things you can spend money on for a base 748 like light wheels or good tires and a track day. Do you really need them? I personally don't see the need for radial calipers on a 748 even if you track your bike. Why not drop some cash on a good set of pads and a 19x20 radial master cylinder if its responsiveness and feel you're looking for? ________________,,,

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

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Tyre pressures for a 175/65R14 tyre


Hi, sorry to say but there is no standard pressure for a tire size. It depends on make, load, tire type i.e. radial or crossply, tubed or tubeless. My Suzuki rear tire original Dunlop radial 36psi. changed to a Bridgestone same size 39psi. I would check with the tire manufacturer, if you run the tire over or under inflated you risk damaging the tire, poor grip and stability.

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1 Answer

What socket do i need for removing the caliper bolts on a 2005 road king custom


The bolts are metric and use a 10mm 12 point head.
To re-install caliper:
1, Loosely install long caliper mounting bolt into upper
lug of front fork leg.
2, Install short caliper mounting bolt into lower lug of
front fork leg. Tighten lower mounting bolt to 28-38
ft-lbs (37.9-51.5 Nm).
3, Tighten upper caliper mounting bolt to 28-38 ft-lbs
(37.9-51.5 Nm).
4, Tighten pad pins to 180-200 in-lbs (20.3-22.6 Nm).

May 03, 2014 | 2005 Harley Davidson FLHRS - FLHRSI Road...

1 Answer

How to change the front brake pads on a 2003 ultra classic ?


Take the two bolts out that hold the front caliper onto the fork slider. Lift the caliper off and take the pads out. You must compress the brake caliper piston back into the caliper body. I usually use a large C-clamp or a large slip joint pliers to compress the piston back into the caliper. Protect the finish on your caliper with rags or thin pieces of wood. Once you get the piston back into the caliper, replace the pads with the new ones making certain that the fiber side of the pad is facing towards the rotor. Put the caliper back into position and reinstall the two bolts. Torque them to 25 foot pounds of torque. Work the front brake lever until you have a full firm brake.

Good Luck
Steve

May 02, 2011 | 2004 Harley Davidson FLHT - FLHTI Electra...

1 Answer

How to change front brake pads on 2004 harley davidson road king


Never did that on a 2004 king. But if they are like the ones on my 2000 Wide Glide;

USE LOCTITE ON ALL THREADS. JUST A FEW DROPS WILL DO.

There are two pins that go through the caliper that hold the pads in place You will need a different socket to loosen them. It is a 1/4 inch with twelve points. The bolts that hold the caliper to the forks are also a 12 point but I believe it is a 10mm. So go get the right sockets.

Now that you have those odd tools, loosen but do not remove the two pins in the caliper.

Before you go farther, check the fluid level in the master. If fluid was added when the pads wore down, it will now have too much fluid and could spill on the bike when you open the calipers. It should appear a bit low right now. If not, remove some fluid so it can't spill.

Remove the two bolts that hold the entire caliper to the fork. Notice if one is longer than the other. some Harleys use a longer bolt in the top hole. Make sure they go back in the same place.

Slide the caliper off of the brake rotor. Use a tool to pry the caliper wide open. You need all the space you can get or the new pads will not slide over the rotor. If you don't have a "regular" tool for that, I have used two screw drivers or pry bars in an X pattern by pressing against the pads until all of the pistons are fully depressed.

Now you can remove the pins from the caliper. Might to pull with pliers. Pay attention to where the brake pads go. One pad has two full tabs next to the hole where the pin goes through and the other pad has one tab and one rounded off section next to the hole.

Ok now look back at how your old pads were installed in the caliper. My book is for the wide glide so it might be different. Put the new pads in the same location as your old ones were in.
If for some reason you lost track then use the next paragraph in { }.

{ If your bike has two front brakes, on the right brake caliper, the pad with two tabs installs on the inside closest to the wheel. The pad with only one full tab goes on the outside, away from the wheel.
For the left caliper, the pad with two full tabs installs on the outside furthest away from the wheel. The pad with only one tab goes on the inside closest to the wheel. }

Slip the new pads into the caliper. Install the pins by pushing in till you feel or hear a small click. You probably will have to jiggle the pads around to get the pins through but stop at the click or the pins will be too far through. Slip the caliper over the rotor and loosely install the bolts that hold the caliper to the fork.

If you have two front brakes, go to the side that has the hole through the axle. The hole should be aligned with the edge of the forks. Slip a 7/16 drill bit through that hole and make certain the bit just touches the edge of the forks. That is important for alignment of the brakes. If the drill bit does not touch the forks loosen the pinch bolt at the lowest end of the fork and slide the fork over until the drill bit touches. Tighten the pinch bolt to 30 lbs.

now tighten the bottom bolt that holds the caliper to the fork to 30lbs. then the top bolt to 30. Now you can tighten the pins that go through the caliper but be gentle, they only need 16 foot pounds of torque. That barely registers on most torque wrenches. If you have an inch pound wrench tighten to 200 inch pounds.

now you will need to pump the brake lever multiple times to get the new pads to come out and make contact with the rotor. When the brake lever feels firm that means the caliper is pinching the rotor correctly.
Check the front brake fluid reservoir and top it off if it is low.

That should do it.

Jun 17, 2010 | 2004 Harley Davidson FLHRCI Road King...

1 Answer

2001 cbr f-y is it carb or injaction


Model: Honda CBR 600 F4 Year: 2000 Category: Sport Engine and transmission Displacement: 599.00 ccm (36.55 cubic inches) Engine type: 599cc, liquid-cooled, inline, four-cylinder, DOHC, four valves per cylinder Stroke: 4 Bore x Stroke: 67mm X 42.5mm Carburetion: Four 36.5 mm slanted flat-side CV Compression Ratio: 12.0:1 Power: 110.00 HP (80.3 kW)) @ 12500 RPM Torque: 68.00 Nm (6.9 kgf-m or 50.2 ft.lbs) @ 10500 RPM Starter: Electric (Digital transistorized, with 3D mapping) Cooling system: Liquid Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type
final drive:
#525 O-ring sealed chain Physical measures Dry weight: 170.0 kg (374.8 pounds) Seat height: 810 mm (31.9 inches) Wheelbase: 1,395 mm (54.9 inches) Chassis and dimensions Front brakes: 296mm dual disc with four-piston calipers Rear brakes: 220mm single disc Tires Front tires: 120/70 ZR-17 radial Rear tires: 180/55-ZR-17 radial Speed and acceleration Quarter Mile Time: 11.00 seconds @ 124.65mph (199.44km/h) Top speed: 260.0 km/h (161.6 mph) Power/weight ratio: 0.6471 HP/kg Other specifications Fuel capacity: 18.00 litres (4.76 gallons) including 0.8 gal. Reserve Color options: Blue/red, black/yellow, black/dark gray

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1 Answer

I have rgv 250 n ive put some 6 pot tokico,s on with standard master cyl brakes good but feels not right but will a radial master cyl of a r6 o8 be mutch better has anybody done this feels like the wrong...


It's possible that the brake system is not thoroughly bled. It can take a lot of work to completely bleed a system after it's been disassembled. I would recommend re-bleeding, making sure to bleed at all the banjo bolts (for each banjo bolt, pump and hold the lever, crack the bolt open 1/4 turn, and then retorque while holding the lever down -- repeat for each banjo). You can also tap the calipers, lines, and master cylinder with a rubber mallet or screwdriver handle while bleeding. If you have access to a pressure bleeder, I would recommend using it, as this will do the job faster.

However, it's also possible your master cylinder is not a proper match for your calipers. Different master cylinders have various bore diameters and stroke lengths which affect feel and performance.

I'm sure it goes without saying that your brakes are a critical component of your bike. Making modifications you are unsure of can lead to life threatening failures. I would not recommend swapping brake components unless you are sure that the components you are installing are compatible with each other and your bike.

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1 Answer

Tires


The main difference between radials and bias-ply tires lies in their construction. Tires aren’t just toroidal balloons, they are reinforced with cords of steel or synthetic materials such as nylon or Aramid. In bias-ply tires, the fibers are wrapped in an X pattern between the beads; in radial tires, the fibers are wrapped perpendicular to the tread. Radial tires have more flexible sidewalls than bias-ply tires, and thus absorb road irregularities better and have a comparatively larger contact patch when leaned over. Because of the flexible nature of a radial, these offer higher mileage compared with a comparable bias-ply for a given rubber compound. Since they absorb small road irregularities better, they ride more comfortably and are less likely to be upset by groovy pavement. While radial tires perform better than bias tires, some older motorcycles can’t be fitted with radial tires because of differences in rim profiles. You probably won’t notice much of a difference anyway, so stick with boas tires if that’s what the motorcycle was designed for.

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1 Answer

Will 1098 forks fit 996


will the 1098 Showa forks fit a 996 have done a search but haven't found much. I know they will fit in the standard 996 triple clamps but will my standard 996 wheel and brake rotors fit or will i need different offset rotors?The 1098 forks are actually pretty much the same as the xx9 forks. The xx8 bikes use a different diameter upper fork tube, so it won't just fit in. I think the xx8 is 53mm top and 54mm bottom and the 848/1098 is 54mm all the way through. So you'd have to change the triples, which isn't a big deal, you should be able to fit a xx9 triple on there. Even after that, they are radial mounts and you'd have to get a different set of rotors and calipers. Its not a big deal to do any of this... If you want a better front end on your 996, I highly suggest re-building the stock showa's with ohlins inserts. If you want better braking, buy a set of the older gold series 4pod/pad calipers, they work fantastic and mount to all the older forks. Radial mounts are a gimmick and a rebuilt fork is always gonna be better then a stock one...,,,

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1 Answer

Radial calipers


and have found these. They are described as: .. designed to adapt forks having standard bottom configurations to facilitate the use of radial brake calipers. The kit is intended specifically for use with the Ohlins R&T forks and Ducati superbike models prior to the 749 and 999. So I take it they will fit. Then I've found some radial calipers from a 2007 S4R. Having done some searching of the forum I'm still very confused about fitment offests etc - and have seen one thread warning about using 65-100 something! Can anyone give me a quick answer - what would need to be done to make these fit, or what should I be looking for?,Radial caliper conversions cost a big chunk of change and in my humble opinion there are way cooler things you can spend money on for a base 748 like light wheels or good tires and a track day. Do you really need them? I personally don't see the need for radial calipers on a 748 even if you track your bike. Why not drop some cash on a good set of pads and a 19x20 radial master cylinder if its responsiveness and feel you're looking for? ________________,,,

Nov 10, 2008 | 2001 Ducati 748

1 Answer

Radial tires and bias-ply tires


The main difference between radials and bias-ply tires lies in their construction. Tires aren’t just toroidal balloons they are reinforced with cords of steel or synthetic materials such as nylon or Aramid. In bias-ply tires the fibers are wrapped in an X pattern between the beads; in radial tires the fibers are wrapped perpendicular to the tread. Radial tires have more flexible sidewalls than bias-ply tires, and thus absorb road irregularities better and have a comparatively larger contact patch when leaned over. Because of the flexible nature of a radial, these offer higher mileage compared with a comparable bias-ply for a given rubber compound. Since they absorb small road irregularities better, they ride more comfortably and are less likely to be upset by groovy pavement. ,,,

Nov 10, 2008 | 2005 AJP PR4 125 Supermotard

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