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Honda engine parts 187ccg50 en no 1015879 carb needle and slide

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6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 174 Answers

SOURCE: needle in carb

The needle should move with the float. When the bowl is full it should cut off the flow of gas.

Posted on Jul 05, 2009

billfox1966
  • 231 Answers

SOURCE: needle

if your refering to the needle located in the center of the throttle slide tube, then yes it needs to be stationary held in b a snap ring or some sort of a clip device

Posted on Jul 10, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Thank you.I have a 1993

Have you tested the throttle cable is working?

Posted on Aug 10, 2010

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Carburator cleaning


its like 100 steps. you want us to type that out? and no YEAR?!
clean and tune, now that is even more steps.
got wide band portable oxygen sensor , so we can tune it easy.
or 2 days ,driving on a track and tuning by feel and spark plug tip readings?
so cleaning.
1: dismantle it.
2: clean all metal parts, in cleaner (called carb cleaner)
3: buy the kit.
3: install all parts and kit parts, per the FSM pages on CARB. and
setting the float level per book.
4: set the needle (slide) where it was before. needle clip.

then tune it per the FSM or use WB o2 sensor, at idle, cruise and WOT.

Feb 27, 2014 | Hero Honda Motorcycles

1 Answer

Where is the needle jet clip for xl 250 honda?


If it has a needle jet clip it will be located inside the slide for the carburetor. If you remove the slide from the carb the needle will still be attached. Look inside the top of the slide and it will be held down by a screw/plate/hex retainer or other means. If this is a single carb engine then it will be ok to remove it but if this is a multiple carb engine, then the carb sync will be disturbed and most likely need to be reset.

Oct 14, 2013 | Mikuni Mikuni Jet Needle Clip

1 Answer

Hi i have a 1975 honda cb200..new plugs,points and timing set..new carb kits inc needles.tried different coil and condenser....great untill engine up to temp..then flat spot off tickover......also black...


Move the clip on the jet needle lower on the needle. This will help with the flat spot by giving fuel earlier. The black smoke is a rich fuel mixture. Check to see that the carb kit had stock jet sizes. Be sure to synchronize the carb slides so they both begin to lift at the same exact moment. tombones49_223.gif

Aug 08, 2011 | 1974 Honda CB 200

1 Answer

Bike sat for 1 yr. starts on choke and idels but when throtle applied it stalls.


Remove airfilter hose from the back of each carb, using your finger gently lift the slide upwards to ensure movment,
You may need to remove carbs for serviceing, when on choke fuel enters the engine through the choke and or primary jet, when you open the throttle the fuel demand comes from the mainjet, the slide needle becomes stuck in the diffuser and the main jet becomes restricted, as a result of old fuel contamination builds up and requires the parts being dismantled for cleaning, good luck

Apr 20, 2011 | 2005 Honda VT 750 DC Shadow Spirit

3 Answers

I need to clean carburetor on 340gx honda pressure washer. How would I do this?


pour large amounts of liquid carb cleaner into the gas tank
Let it run for a couple of minutes then shut it off and let it sit for a couple of days.

Aug 16, 2010 | Honda Garden

1 Answer

I have a '94 Shadow 600. Engine starts fine. But even after it's warmed up it begins to backfire at idle and dies when I throttle it. Tank is full of gas.I'm certain both cylinders are firing, but no...


BEFORE YOU START
You are haveing carb problems.
Make sure that dirty carbs are actually your problem. Lots of things can make a bike run poorly or not start. Weak battery, corroded electrics, old spark plugs, bad timing, low compression, mis-adjusted valves, dirty air filter, and plugged exhausts can all cause poor running. I'll write an article eventually on how to diagnose poor running conditions shortly, but for now - lets just deal with the carbs.

There are many passageways and openings to check and clean. All are important in function and when obstructed or not working properly, have subtle to radical effects on engine performance. Vacuum leaks and carburetor synchronization also have effects on performance and should be inspected and adjusted following the below procedures.

Carb Cleaning 101
Warning: Remove all rubber parts before you begin. These parts usually include vacuum diaphragms, needle valves, o’rings, hoses, and other parts. Spray cleaners will damage these parts. Do not disassemble individual carbs from the carb bracket.

Air & Fuel Passageways: Trace and learn individual fuel and air circuits from beginning to end. Machines can only drill straight through the cast passageways. To change direction, another angled passageway must be drilled. The union is plugged with a brass or bronze bead. Inspect and clean each passageway with spray cleaner, brushes/pipe cleaners/etc, and compressed air. Remove any discoloration and debris. Look for spray cleaner to exit from one or more passageways.

Jet Cleaning: Inspect jets by holding to light and look through them. You should see an unobstructed round hole. Clean the jets with one or more of the following: jet cleaning wires, soak solutions, carb spray cleaners and compressed air. Re-inspect jets after cleaning and install when clear of obstructions. Some main jets have paper-like gaskets. Most have metal spacers between the jet and the emulsion tube. Some screw directly into a brass emulsion tube which is machined for a 7mm wrench at its float chamber exposed base.

Inlet Fuel Valve: Inspect the needle valve & spring. Press down the tiny metal rod that protrudes from the **** or float end of the needle valve. The spring should move freely and return the rod to its location. Check the needle valve’s seat area for a groove or other wear. It should appear highly polished. Some needle valve seats are rubber and wear may not be visible. Inspect the needle valve jet seat. You can clean the jet seat with Q-tips and semi-chrome polish if necessary.

Carb Body Castings: Blow air through the atmospheric vent holes located on the dome of each float bowl chamber. Air should exit via hoses or brass nipples. Inspect the emulsion tubes and passageways (cast towers that jets thread into) for discoloration and debris. Clean interior emulsion towers with a soft bristle gun cleaning brush. Clean each Venturi (main carb bore).

Needle Jets & Jet Needles: Clean the needle jets, jet needles, and passageway or tower that needle jet screws into. Clean the emulsion tube (pipe between needle jet and main jet) (Main Jet may screw into emulsion tube). Jet needles are part of the throttle slides. See below…

Throttle Slides: There are several types of throttle slides: Mechanical linkage, vacuum, diaphragm, and cable. Disassembling the jet needle from the slide is not always required for cleaning. If you have vacuum piston type throttle slides (large diameter solid metal slide), avoid cleaning the lubrication from sides and caps. If piston type check cap vents and passageways with air. Clean if necessary and re-lube. If you have rubber vacuum throttle diaphragms, inspect for dry-rot, defects, and tears by gently stretching rubber away from center. Do this until all areas around diaphragm have been inspected. Replace any defective part as described above. Clean carb body areas around diaphragm including air passageways and air jets. Diaphragms have a locator loop or tab fabricated into their sealing edge. Observe this locator upon reassembly. Avoid pinching the diaphragm when reinstalling caps.

Fuel Screws: Fuel screws have sharp tapered ends. Carefully turn one fuel screw in while counting the turns until it seats lightly. Warning: These screws are very easily damaged if over tightened into their seats. Record amount of "turns-in" and remove the fuel screw, spring, washer, and o'ring. The fuel screw is part of the enrichment (choke) circuit...clean passageways as described above. When carbs are assembled, spray low PSI compressed air into diaphragm air vents located at intake side of carbs. Throttle slides should rise, then fall when air is removed. Lightly lube external moving linkages. Reinstall carbs and follow through with carburetor synchronization.

Throttle Cables: Lubricate cables periodically. If cables are disconnected from carbs or removed for replacement, etc . . . remember cable routing and ensure proper reinstallation routing. Avoid bread-tying, sharp bends, and pinching cables. Adjust cables so throttle grip has about 5mm of play or throttle slides or butterfly valves may not open completely (full throttle)(wide full open).

Float Bowls: Inspect float bowls for sediment, gum or varnish, crystallization, and defects. Clean all pipes, tubes, passageways, and embedded jets with cleaners and compressed air. Remove and clean the drain screw and area. Inspect bowl gasket and replace if necessary. Clean and inspect overflow pipes and tubes, look for vertical cracks.

Floats: There are several types of float materials: plastic, brass, black composite, tin, and others. Handle floats carefully. Avoid bending, twisting, denting, or other means of mishandling. Most floats are adjustable by bending a small metal tab near the float axle end. Do not change the float adjuster tab unless tuning fuel service levels. Clean metal floats by soaking or by spraying cleaner and wiping clean. Other material type floats may require replacement if cleaning is necessary. Inspect the needle valve (float valve) and seat. Check needle valve’s spring loaded pin. It should depress and return smoothly and without resistance. Check the needle valve’s tip for a worn groove. Replace needle valve and seat if either symptom exists. These parts wear together and must be replaced as a set.

Choke Plungers: It is common for Mikuni slide carburetors to have indented or hardened choke plunger pads. If the pads are worn, indented or hardened with age, then the idle of your bike will vary wildly as the pads no longer seal well.

Synchronization: This is a fine adjustment performed usually and preferably with the carbs installed and the engine running. The unusual part is performed with gauged wire with the carbs on the work bench. Carburetor synchronizing balances Venturi vacuum at the exhaust side of each carburetor, resulting with smooth idling and optimized performance at all throttle openings. Synchronization is checked using a set of gauges which are either air vacuum type or liquid mercury type. The gauges are connected to vacuum ports on the intake manifolds via nipple tubes or if sealed with screws, sync gauge adapters will be needed. With the engine running at temperature, and with a fan or means of forced convection aimed onto the engine, the carbs fuel screws and idle are adjusted, then the synchronization is adjusted via adjustment screws on the carbs. A reserve fuel tank is recommended for convenience of accessing carbs during this procedure. See gauge instructions and repair manuals for detailed use of synchronization gauges.

Notes: While carbs are apart, record the jet sizes. Look for a very small number imprinted on the body of the jets. Verify that numbers are the same for all jets on models with in-line cylinders. A few transverse-4 models and V-engines, the inner and outer carbs use some different size jets and it's important to not mix them up. If you have dial or verneer calipers, measure and record float heights. Perform measurements with floats just touching needle valves, though not depressing the needle valve rods. Replace fuel and vacuum hoses. Be sure to use fuel rated hose for fuel. Install or replace in-line fuel filters. It’s a good time to remove and clean interior petcock fuel filters. Inspect carb manifolds for dry-rotting, inspect all clamps and air ducts. Inspect, clean, lube, and/or replace air filter(s).

Nov 25, 2009 | 1994 Honda VT 600 C Shadow

1 Answer

Clogged carburator, how do I get it out to clean?


BEFORE YOU START
Make sure that dirty carbs are actually your problem. Lots of things can make a bike run poorly or not start. Weak battery, corroded electrics, old spark plugs, bad timing, low compression, mis-adjusted valves, dirty air filter, and plugged exhausts can all cause poor running. I'll write an article eventually on how to diagnose poor running conditions shortly, but for now - lets just deal with the carbs.
There are many passageways and openings to check and clean. All are important in function and when obstructed or not working properly, have subtle to radical effects on engine performance. Vacuum leaks and carburetor synchronization also effect performance and should be inspected and adjusted following the below procedures.

Carb Cleaning 101
Warning: Remove all rubber parts before you begin. These parts usually include vacuum diaphragms, needle valves, o'rings, hoses, and other parts. Spray cleaners will damage these parts. Do not disassemble individual carbs from the carb bracket.

Air & Fuel Passageways: Trace and learn individual fuel and air circuits from beginning to end. Machines can only drill straight through the cast passageways. To change direction, another angled passageway must be drilled. The union is plugged with a brass or bronze bead. Inspect and clean each passageway with spray cleaner, brushes/pipe cleaners/etc, and compressed air. Remove any discoloration and debris. Look for spray cleaner to exit from one or more passageways.

Jet Cleaning: Inspect jets by holding to light and look through them. You should see an unobstructed round hole. Clean the jets with one or more of the following: jet cleaning wires, soak solutions, carb spray cleaners and compressed air. Re-inspect jets after cleaning and install when clear of obstructions. Some main jets have paper-like gaskets. Most have metal spacers between the jet and the emulsion tube. Some screw directly into a brass emulsion tube which is machined for a 7mm wrench at its float chamber exposed base.

Inlet Fuel Valve: Inspect the needle valve & spring. Press down the tiny metal rod that protrudes from the **** or float end of the needle valve. The spring should move freely and return the rod to its location. Check the needle valve's seat area for a groove or other wear. It should appear highly polished. Some needle valve seats are rubber and wear may not be visible. Inspect the needle valve jet seat. You can clean the jet seat with Q-tips and semi-chrome polish if necessary.

Carb Body Castings: Blow air through the atmospheric vent holes located on the dome of each float bowl chamber. Air should exit via hoses or brass nipples. Inspect the emulsion tubes and passageways (cast towers that jets thread into) for discoloration and debris. Clean interior emulsion towers with a soft bristle gun cleaning brush. Clean each Venturi (main carb bore).

Needle Jets & Jet Needles: Clean the needle jets, jet needles, and passageway or tower that needle jet screws into. Clean the emulsion tube (pipe between needle jet and main jet) (Main Jet may screw into emulsion tube). Jet needles are part of the throttle slides. See below…

Throttle Slides: There are several types of throttle slides: Mechanical linkage, vacuum, diaphragm, and cable. Disassembling the jet needle from the slide is not always required for cleaning. If you have vacuum piston type throttle slides (large diameter solid metal slide), avoid cleaning the lubrication from sides and caps. If piston type check cap vents and passageways with air. Clean if necessary and re-lube. If you have rubber vacuum throttle diaphragms, inspect for dry-rot, defects, and tears by gently stretching rubber away from center. Do this until all areas around diaphragm have been inspected. Replace any defective part as described above. Clean carb body areas around diaphragm including air passageways and air jets. Diaphragms have a locator loop or tab fabricated into their sealing edge. Observe this locator upon reassembly. Avoid pinching the diaphragm when reinstalling caps.

Fuel Screws: Fuel screws have sharp tapered ends. Carefully turn one fuel screw in while counting the turns until it seats lightly. Warning: These screws are very easily damaged if over tightened into their seats. Record amount of "turns-in" and remove the fuel screw, spring, washer, and o'ring. The fuel screw is part of the enrichment (choke) circuit...clean passageways as described above. When carbs are assembled, spray low PSI compressed air into diaphragm air vents located at intake side of carbs. Throttle slides should rise, then fall when air is removed. Lightly lube external moving linkages. Reinstall carbs and follow through with carburetor synchronization.

Throttle Cables: Lubricate cables periodically. If cables are disconnected from carbs or removed for replacement, etc . . . remember cable routing and ensure proper reinstallation routing. Avoid bread-tying, sharp bends, and pinching cables. Adjust cables so throttle grip has about 5mm of play or throttle slides or butterfly valves may not open completely (full throttle)(wide full open).

Float Bowls: Inspect float bowls for sediment, gum or varnish, crystallization, and defects. Clean all pipes, tubes, passageways, and embedded jets with cleaners and compressed air. Remove and clean the drain screw and area. Inspect bowl gasket and replace if necessary. Clean and inspect overflow pipes and tubes, look for vertical cracks.

Floats: There are several types of float materials: plastic, brass, black composite, tin, and others. Handle floats carefully. Avoid bending, twisting, denting, or other means of mishandling. Most floats are adjustable by bending a small metal tab near the float axle end. Do not change the float adjuster tab unless tuning fuel service levels. Clean metal floats by soaking or by spraying cleaner and wiping clean. Other material type floats may require replacement if cleaning is necessary. Inspect the needle valve (float valve) and seat. Check needle valve's spring loaded pin. It should depress and return smoothly and without resistance. Check the needle valve's tip for a worn groove. Replace needle valve and seat if either symptom exists. These parts wear together and must be replaced as a set.

Synchronization: This is a fine adjustment performed usually and preferably with the carbs installed and the engine running. The unusual part is performed with gauged wire with the carbs on the work bench. Carburetor synchronizing balances Venturi vacuum at the exhaust side of each carburetor, resulting with smooth idling and optimized performance at all throttle openings. Synchronization is checked using a set of gauges which are either air vacuum type or liquid mercury type. The gauges are connected to vacuum ports on the intake manifolds via nipple tubes or if sealed with screws, sync gauge adapters will be needed. With the engine running at temperature, and with a fan or means of forced convection aimed onto the engine, the carbs fuel screws and idle are adjusted, then the synchronization is adjusted via adjustment screws on the carbs. A reserve fuel tank is recommended for convenience of accessing carbs during this procedure. See gauge instructions and repair manuals for detailed use of synchronization gauges.

Notes: While carbs are apart, record the jet sizes. Look for a very small number imprinted on the body of the jets. Verify that numbers are the same for all jets on models with in-line cylinders. A few transverse-4 models and V-engines, the inner and outer carbs use some different size jets and it's important to not mix them up. If you have dial or veneer calipers, measure and record float heights. Perform measurements with floats just touching needle valves, though not depressing the needle valve rods. Replace fuel and vacuum hoses. Be sure to use fuel rated hose for fuel. Install or replace in-line fuel filters. It's a good time to remove and clean interior petcock fuel filters. Inspect carb manifolds for dry-rotting, inspect all clamps and air ducts. Inspect, clean, lube, and/or replace air filter(s).

Nov 24, 2009 | 2007 Yamaha V Star Classic

1 Answer

Needle n seat adjustment yamaha virago 920


Hello dnjvp...The Hitachi HSC 40mm carbs on the 920 can be jetted and modded as needed to give you the right mixture for any engine or exhaust modifications.
Here is the breakdown for the slide and the internal parts. Check the needle for wear, clean all parts and put back together. Make sure you hold the diaphragm up to the light and check for pinholes. If any are found use a sealer like to fix.

picture3.gif
Good luck...i hope this helps.

Jul 28, 2009 | 1986 Yamaha FJ 1100

1 Answer

I have a strange problem, when i let the clutch out!


This is a strange problem. As such, you gotta agree to give me at least a "Helpful" rating even if we don't end up with a fix. After all, I am trying to help.

All that being said, I think the problem is in the carbs. The bike is running lean in the low rev range and now you are putting a load on the engine. I can't identify if your carbs are CV carbs ( Vacuum controlled carb slides), or standard carbs with throttle controlled slides. Assuming standard carbs, For each carb; remove the carb cap and pull out the slide. Now move the clip on the top of the jet needle down one notch. This will richen the low end fuel mix. Now there is more power to handle the load on the engine. Two notches may be needed but start with one.

EXACTLY what bike do you have; i.e. "1996 Honda CBR500 SE" or "1996 Honda CBR500 R6"
Also, is there an electrical switch built into the clutch lever assembly?

Jun 27, 2009 | 1996 Honda CB 500

1 Answer

I have a 1984 XR200R with the dual carb set up


You need to remove the top cap off the carb(s) then lift the slide out of the throat of the carb. You will see a long needle in the center of the slide. Lift the needle out then move the clip on the top of the needle down one notch. Two notches may be needed but start with one. Now re-assemble the carb(s). Doing this will richen the low end fuel mix.

Go to the site below where you can see a parts diagram for your specific bike. You will select the actual brand, year, model, etc., once you go to the site. Part numbers and prices are also shown. You can order parts from this site. In the event no price is shown on a particular part, the part is not in stock.
www.babbittsonline.com/pages/parts/viewbybrandand/parts.aspx

Top rating due on this answer for sure! Thanks!

Jun 06, 2009 | Honda XR 200 Motorcycles

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