Tip & How-To about Motorcycles

Susspension set up for Motorcross bikes

When I need to set up a motorcross bikes suspension I set all the settings (both rebound & compression) to the middle of the range on both the front suspension & the rear suspension

Now, measure the distance from the inside of the rear mudguard and the top of the rear tyre & note the distance.

Now repeat with the rider seated in position and note the difference,

This value should be 20mm. If not adjust rear spring pre-load to correct.

Now, measure the distance from the inside of the front mudguard and the top of the front tyre & note the distance.

Now repeat with the rider seated in position and note the difference,

This value should be 15mm. If not adjust front spring pre-load to correct.(if adjustable).

This gives you your starting point for the fine tuning with the dampening adjustments to suit the riders preferances.



Regards Andrew Porrelli



Posted by on

Motorcycles Logo

Related Topics:

Related Questions:

1 Answer

yamaha settings


bottom of forks turn all the way in, then back out 12 clicks
top of fork - trail riding = all the way out then turn in 2 clicks, track riding = turn in 8 clicks
Rear spring needs to be adjusted so the tip of the rear fender drops 2.75" when sitting on it.
The top adjustment (compression valve) will be close to all the way out for trail and 5 to 8 clicks turned in for track.
The bottom adjustment meters how slow or fast the shock extends (rebound). Stand on something at peg height with one foot on the peg and the other on your stand and shove the bike down. Adjust the bottom (rebound) clicker to match the front of the bike so that both return to top at the same time.
This is a good starting point for any bike.
To fine tune your suspension it is always best to have a suspension tech watch you ride and make adjustments until the chassis of the bike stays flat while the suspension does its work. Usually take a tech 20 minutes to set the front and rear compression and rebound track-side!

Jul 05, 2014 | 2003 Yamaha YZ 250 F

1 Answer

i want to adjust the suspension on my motorcycle, how do i go about doing this?


Take the bike off its stand onto level ground and stand next to it. While holding your motorcycle upright, put one foot on the foot peg next to you and press hard on it. The front and rear of the bike should squash down and raise at the same rate. If not adjust rear damping compression and rebound to compensate

Now you have a comfortable bike with adequate suspension balance. Now let’s fine tune it a bit. Again there are no tricks to setting up your rear wheel suspension, you have to understand what causes your rear suspension to work. Since rebound occurs after compression we will deal with compression first.

Aug 26, 2010 | Yamaha V Star Silverado Motorcycles

1 Answer

factory suspension settings


Spring preload FR
To increase the spring preload and
thereby harden the suspension, turn
the adjusting bolt on each fork leg in direction
a. To decrease the spring preload
and thereby soften the
suspension, turn the adjusting bolt on
each fork leg in direction b
NOTE: _
Align the appropriate groove on the adjusting
mechanism with the top of the
front fork cap bolt.
_
CI-10E
Rebound damping force
To increase the rebound damping
force and thereby harden the rebound
damping, turn the adjusting screw on
each fork leg in direction a. To decrease
the rebound damping force and
thereby soften the rebound damping,
turn the adjusting screw on each fork
leg in direction b.
CI-02E
Compression damping force
To increase the compression damping
force and thereby harden the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw
on each fork leg in direction a. To decrease
the compression damping force
and thereby soften the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw on
each fork leg in direction b.
CI-02E
1. Current setting
2. Front fork cap bolt
Setting
Minimum (soft) 8
Standard 6
Maximum (hard) 1
1. Rebound damping force adjusting screw
Minimum (soft) 26 clicks in direction b*
Standard 13 clicks in direction b*
Maximum (hard) 1 click in direction b*
* With the adjusting screw fully turned in direction a
1. Compression damping force adjusting screw
Minimum (soft) 20 clicks in direction b*
Standard 13 clicks in direction b*
Maximum (hard) 1 click in direction b*
* With the adjusting screw fully turned in direction a
_
Although the total number of clicks of a
damping force adjusting mechanism
may not exactly match the above specifications
due to small differences in
production, the actual number of clicks
always represents the entire adjusting
range. To obtain a precise adjustment,
it would be advisable to check the number
of clicks of each damping force adjusting
mechanism and to modify the
specifications as necessary
CI-10E
Rebound damping force RR
To increase the rebound damping
force and thereby harden the rebound
damping, turn the adjusting screw in direction
a. To decrease the rebound
damping force and thereby soften the
rebound damping, turn the adjusting
screw in direction b.
CI-14E
Compression damping force
To increase the compression damping
force and thereby harden the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw
in direction a. To decrease the compression
damping force and thereby
soften the compression damping, turn
the adjusting screw in direction b.
CI-14E
Setting
Minimum (soft) 1
Standard 4
Maximum (hard) 9

Whole process where need to turn toward "a" means clockwise and "b" counterclockwise. From Yamaha service manual. Hope this is good enough info to help you out. Good?

May 03, 2010 | 2002 Yamaha YZF-R1

3 Answers

yamaha yz250 suspension settings


There is too much involved to include everything, but I can describe to you what everything does.

You have compression dampening which slows the rate at which the shock or forks can compress. Then you have rebound dampening which slows the rate at which the shock or forks can extend.

The compression adjuster on the rear shock is toward the top, sticking out sideways where the resivoir mounts to the side of the shock. The rebound adjuster can be seen below the swing arm on the side of the shock.

The compression adjusters on the front forks can be seen from the top. (its the one in the center, the other is an air bleed) The rebound adjuster is in the center of the lower fork leg, and can be seen from below the fork.



The settings are measured in the number of "clicks" from seated. More clicks from seated will be softer, and less clicks from seated will be stiffer. The best thing to do is to see where you are now and adjusting from there. I like to write them down as I go. Turn the adjuster clockwise untill it stops and take note of the number of clicks. DO NOT FORCE IT! You should also check your service manual and take note of the standard setting, and also take note of the maximum number of clicks you can go from seated. You dont want to screw the adjusters out farther than the max, shock damage can result.

You might try changing to the standard settings and try adjusting from there. If the bike doesnt ride at least moderately decent at the standard settings, your shock and/or forks may need a rebuild.


Generally speaking more compression dampening in the rear will result in less bottoming but a harsher ride. Less would result in the oppisite.

More rebound dampening in the rear will result in too slow of extension and packing up which will make the bike swap in the whoops, but it will not tend to buck you or throw you into a nose dive over a jump. Less would result in the oppisite.

In the front, more compression dampening will be about the same situation as described above with the shock.

More rebound dampening in the front forks can tend to take pressure off of the front wheel in corners causing washout, but too little can make the bike want to loop out over jumps.

Nov 21, 2008 | 2003 Yamaha YZ 250

1 Answer

adjustng the suspension


adjust your sag but i saw a pro do it with no more than 4 inches. Be sure your wearing all your gear when checking the sag. For rebound if the back of the bike is coming up and hit your butt when your on the breaks before a corner you have to much rear rebound. One good idea is to have a friend film you while you ride to see what the bike is doing. If it packs down to little rebound if it jumps up and down to much rebound. Compression will adjust how fast the shocks move in. If your at a track your suspension should bottom out on the biggest jump which should be about once a lap. Most bikes are set up to wear you don't really need to move the compression or rebound clickers. First thing have to do as I said before is to adjust your sag.

Nov 10, 2008 | 2005 KTM EXC 200

Not finding what you are looking for?

305 people viewed this tip

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Motorcycles Experts

Arnie Burke
Arnie Burke

Level 3 Expert

4535 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

76630 Answers

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

Are you a Motorcycle Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Loading...