Tip & How-To about 2008 Husqvarna TE 450

The TE 450 08 suspension to hard?

Reduce the preload and rebound on all suspension components when you first get your bike, i feet they were way to hard even thou im a large bloke.

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just want to raise rear shock


Firstly, the best starting point for a suspension set up is the manufacturers original settings. This allows you to go back to a baseline set up, no matter how much fiddling around you do.

Because everyone is slightly different and of differing weights, then a bike will work best when set up to the individual. The following rough guide for a solo rider has worked on bikes I've owned to give me a good suspension set up for road use.

Initially we'll adjust the preload on the suspension.
The front preload:-
1. Put a cable tie round the front fork stanchion (the shiney bit).
2. Get help from a mate and lift the front of the bike, so there is no weight on the front forks, and slide the cable tie down the fork until it rests on the fork seal. If you've got USD forks, then slide the cable tie upwards to the fork seal.
3. Put the bike back on the ground.
4. Now wearing all your riding gear, get on the bike gently and allow your full weight to settle on the bike in roughly a riding position. Try not to bounce the bike as you do it. You should now be sitting there with your tip toes lightly on the ground stabilising the bike.
5. When everything is stable, get your mate to slide the cable tie till it again touches the fork seal.
6. Carefully get off the bike.
7. The front of the bike needs lifting again until the weight is off the forks. Now measure the distance between the cable tie and the fork seal. Ideally the gap should be in the region of 30 to 40mm. If the gap is too large then increase the preload and repeat steps 2 to 7, if the gap is too small then reduce the preload and repeat steps 2 to 7.

The rear preload:-
1. With the help of that same good mate, you'll owe him a beer after all this lifting, lift the back of the bike so the weight is off the rear suspension.
2. Measure from the centre of the rear axle to a fixed part of the bike above it. Remember this measurement as R1.
3. Put the bike back down.
4. Now wearing all your riding gear, get on the bike and allow your full weight to settle on the bike in roughly a riding position. You should now be sitting there with your tip toes lightly on the ground stabilising the bike.
5. Measure from the centre of the axle to the same point on the bike as before. Remember this measurment as R2.
6. Now the maths. R1 minus R2 should be in the region of 30 to 40mm. If it's greater, then the rear preload needs increasing and repeat steps 4 to 6. If it's less then the rear preload needs reduciing and repeat steps 4 to 6. The R1 figure isn't going to change so there's no need to do 1 and 2 again.

Now we'll go onto the black art of the damping adjustment.
If the bike feels unstable, loose and rather bouncy, then the rebound damping needs increasing. Just try a little at a time until you find the setting best for you. If the bike feels hard and bumpy, then reduce the rebound damping. Again, just adjust a little at a time. Make a note somewhere how much you've adjusted things.
If the bike has a tendency to bottom out under braking, then increase the front compression damping. If it feels too rigid or tends to hop under braking, then reduce the front compression damping. If the back of the bike bottoms out in depressions or feels unstable in fast corners, then increase the rear compression damping. If the back end feels rigid and harsh, then reduce the rear compression damping. Remember to make a note of all the adjustments you've made.

If it all goes wrong, return the bike to standard settings and start again.

hope this helps


John

Feb 27, 2011 | 2000 Honda CBR 600 F(4)Y

1 Answer

factory suspension settings


Spring preload FR
To increase the spring preload and
thereby harden the suspension, turn
the adjusting bolt on each fork leg in direction
a. To decrease the spring preload
and thereby soften the
suspension, turn the adjusting bolt on
each fork leg in direction b
NOTE: _
Align the appropriate groove on the adjusting
mechanism with the top of the
front fork cap bolt.
_
CI-10E
Rebound damping force
To increase the rebound damping
force and thereby harden the rebound
damping, turn the adjusting screw on
each fork leg in direction a. To decrease
the rebound damping force and
thereby soften the rebound damping,
turn the adjusting screw on each fork
leg in direction b.
CI-02E
Compression damping force
To increase the compression damping
force and thereby harden the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw
on each fork leg in direction a. To decrease
the compression damping force
and thereby soften the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw on
each fork leg in direction b.
CI-02E
1. Current setting
2. Front fork cap bolt
Setting
Minimum (soft) 8
Standard 6
Maximum (hard) 1
1. Rebound damping force adjusting screw
Minimum (soft) 26 clicks in direction b*
Standard 13 clicks in direction b*
Maximum (hard) 1 click in direction b*
* With the adjusting screw fully turned in direction a
1. Compression damping force adjusting screw
Minimum (soft) 20 clicks in direction b*
Standard 13 clicks in direction b*
Maximum (hard) 1 click in direction b*
* With the adjusting screw fully turned in direction a
_
Although the total number of clicks of a
damping force adjusting mechanism
may not exactly match the above specifications
due to small differences in
production, the actual number of clicks
always represents the entire adjusting
range. To obtain a precise adjustment,
it would be advisable to check the number
of clicks of each damping force adjusting
mechanism and to modify the
specifications as necessary
CI-10E
Rebound damping force RR
To increase the rebound damping
force and thereby harden the rebound
damping, turn the adjusting screw in direction
a. To decrease the rebound
damping force and thereby soften the
rebound damping, turn the adjusting
screw in direction b.
CI-14E
Compression damping force
To increase the compression damping
force and thereby harden the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw
in direction a. To decrease the compression
damping force and thereby
soften the compression damping, turn
the adjusting screw in direction b.
CI-14E
Setting
Minimum (soft) 1
Standard 4
Maximum (hard) 9

Whole process where need to turn toward "a" means clockwise and "b" counterclockwise. From Yamaha service manual. Hope this is good enough info to help you out. Good?

May 03, 2010 | 2002 Yamaha YZF-R1

1 Answer

I weigh 110kg and im 6 foot tall what suspension settings would be ideal for my weight/height? I throw it up a few curvy mountains most wkends and I brought the bike of a woman a rather small woman that has not touched the susp settings. Is there a way to set up the susp as this is the first time i am goin to get my mechanic to adjust it to my likings. Cheers Deano.


front preload - 5 lines showing

front rebound damping- stiff

front comp damping- 5 clicks out

rear preload - 15mm from top ring

rear rebound damping - 3 clicks out

rear compression damping - 7 clicks out.

something for you to start with this may or may not suit your riding style ,when readjusting make 1 adjustment at a time and note the changes so you can go back to the starting point above

Jan 27, 2010 | 2001 kawasaki ZX-6R Ninja

1 Answer

WHAT SHOULD COMPRESSION BE FOR 04 KXF 250


Engine: Four-stroke single cylinder with DOHC, four valves
Displacement: 249cc
Bore x stroke: 77.0 x 53.6
Cooling: Liquid
Carburetion: Keihin FCR37 with hot start circuit
Ignition: Digital AC-CDI
Transmission: Five-speed with wet multi-disc manual clutch
Frame: Perimeter style, high-tensile steel with D-section upper frame rails
Suspension type, front: 48mm inverted, cartridge-type telescopic fork
Suspension adjustments, front: 16-way compression and rebound damping
Suspension type, rear: UNI-TRAK single shock system
Suspension adjustments rear: 16-way compression and rebound damping, spring preload
Wheel travel, front: 11.8 in.
Wheel travel, rear: 12.2 in.
Tire, front: 80/100-21 51M
Tire, rear: 100/90-19 57M
Brakes, front / rear: Single semi-floating 250mm disc, dual-piston / single 240mm disc, single-piston
Compression Ration: 12.6:1 ***********************
Rake/Trail: 26.5 degress/110mm
Overall length: 85.4"
Overall width: 33"
Overall height: 50"
Ground clearance: 13.4"
Seat height: 37.4"
Dry weight: 204 pounds
Wheelbase: 58"
Fuel capacity: 2.0 gal.

Jul 09, 2009 | kawasaki Full Suspension Mountain Bike Men

1 Answer

Handling badly very ridgid and unstable arond


i am guessing that you bought the bike secondhand,if so you will probably find that the preload on the front and rear suspension is set to hard,to adjust the rear(some bikes come with the wright tool,but not many)look to the top of the rear suspension shock you should see two locking nuts that go right around the shock,undo the top one(may need to use a large screwdriver and hammer)undo it till about 1/2 inch away from other nut then undo bottom nut and undo till it meets the other nut then sit on the bike and bounce your behind on the seat and see what it feels like it should be softer,repeat the sequence untill you get the suspension feeling the way you want(dont forget to screw the top nut down and lock it tight when you are done,the front forks should have an ajustment for preload,these are normally a simple screw in srew out adjustment,located on the top of each fork leg,screw in(to right) to stiffen up the suspension screw out(to left)to soften up i hope this helps,most ducatis have numerous adjustment for preload,rebound,and damping so what i would do is find a ducati dealer or some one who has a bike similar to yours and get them to run through the various settings and adjustments with you ,you will be surprised at the extent to which you can tune the bikes chassis and suspension to suit your riding style and even the types of road or race track you ride on,i can retune the suspension of my race bike as i have noted the settings for each track i race on and it is worth about 3seconds off my lap times...hope this helps

Jul 05, 2009 | 2001 Ducati 900 SS i.e. N-C

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