Tip & How-To about 2006 kawasaki KX 250 F

How to set valves

To adjust your valves you will need a few standard tools and most importantly a set of feeler gauges. You can buy these at any automotive store. The first step is removing the tank and valve cover to gain access to the valve train. You will see both the intake and exhaust cams plus the tops of the valves. This is where you will be measuring with the feeler gauge. The next thing would be to rotate the motor to top dead center. You will need to remove both inspection covers that are on the side of your ignition cover. This will give you access to the timing marks and to the bolt that allows you to turn the motor over.

Check in your manual as to what direction to turn the motor over. You do not want to turn the motor over in the wrong direction. Turn the motor over looking into the inspection (top) hole. You will notice a mark on the fly wheel. When you see this mark come around, look up at the cams. There should be two punch marks on the cam gears that line up with the gasket surface towards the outside of the head. At this point you should be at top dead center compression. Check the lobes of the cam, they should not be touching the valve buckets. If they are touching the valve buckets, this means that you are 180 degrees out of time. Rotate the motor 180 degrees and then start to measure.

After you measure the clearance between the cam lobe and the valve bucket, you will want to write that down. You will then need to check your numbers against the spec's provided in your service manual. If you are outside the specified range, you will need to remove your cams and replace the shims. There should be a chart in your manual that will help you to decide what shims you will need to bring you within the safe range. When dealing with the KXF250 or the RMZ 250, you want to make sure you use the correct shims. There are two types that will fit these bikes, but only one is the correct shim. Shims come both forged and sintered. They look the same until you put them under a magnifying glass, then the difference is very clear. The forged shims have a smooth surface, while the sintered shims have very small cavities. Using the sintered shims will prematurely wear the coating off of the valve stem. This will shorten valve life and cause the valves to go out of adjustment sooner.

Now, after replacing the shims, all that is left is to reassemble your machine. Pay closer attention to the instructions in your owners manual. Always double check your cam timing with what is recommended in the manual. Do not start your bike without turning the motor over by hand first. If you feel it is unusually hard to turn over or it will not turn over, you probably are off on your cam timing. Once again, do not try and start the bike. Go back and retime your cams.

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1 Answer

BP600. How do I adjust valves?


I'm assuming you mean the Stihl BR600, i've added a copy of the breakdown. http://www.mediafire.com/download/56zr9s967sf9a98
you need to access the top of the valves, they should both have an 8mm nit on them. this is the adjustment nut. you get to top dead centre, turn the flywheel by hand until the arrow on the outer of the face lines up with the top ignition module *****. Stihl tools have a feeler gauge you can buy to set them correctly, as normal feeler gauges are too wide to fit under the rocker arms correctly.

Oct 31, 2015 | Garden

1 Answer

need a tune up


Hi there:
You can go to the auto parts store and rent all of the tune up tools you will need. Get a timing light, vacuum gauge, and dwell/tachometer. You will also need a set of feeler gauges.

First, take your distributor cap off and set your point gap with the feeler gauges.
Second, reinstall the cap and start the car to set the dwell.
Third, use the timing light to set your timing.
Fourth, adjust your fast idle with the dwell/tachometer.
Fifth, use your vacuum gauges and set your idle mixture screws to maximum vacuum.


Finally, reset your fast idle since it might be a bit off after adjusting your idle mixture screws.


Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I'll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using Fixya, and have a nice day.

Jul 06, 2012 | 1999 Oldsmobile Cutlass

1 Answer

broken reed valve , need valve ,head gasket


These parts are easy to make. For reed valve, use feeler gauge material or old feeler gauge. This material is easy to cut or grind to size. Gaskets are a bit tricky but material is very cheap and with a little practice, you can make good replacement. If the old gasket was paper, use automotive gasket material sold at all autoparts stores. It is easier to cut thin gasket material so buy thinner than needed and layer. If the gasket is metal, use shim stock or beer / soda can). Good luck with your repair.

Sep 21, 2011 | Clarke Power Products Inc AC2001 2HP 4...

1 Answer

how to Adjust the valve clearance on a 1995 honda odyssey 2.2l mfi 4cyl


most valves are selfadjusting the hydraulics in the valves compensate for ware ( these are called hydraulic lifters if you have solid lifters there are a few tools you need to do the job feeler gauges that go down to .001 up to .040 a few wrenches 10 mil
12 mil rachet to hold and the wrench to turn and unlock the adjuster.. adjust to the spec the manufacture set for that motor

Mar 01, 2010 | 1995 Honda Odyssey

2 Answers

I need to adjust the valves on my Suzuki rm-Z 250. Can you tell me how?


To adjust your valves you will need a few standard tools and most importantly a set of feeler gauges. You can buy these at any automotive store. The first step is removing the tank and valve cover to gain access to the valve train. You will see both the intake and exhaust cams plus the tops of the valves. This is where you will be measuring with the feeler gauge. The next thing would be to rotate the motor to top dead center. You will need to remove both inspection covers that are on the side of your ignition cover. This will give you access to the timing marks and to the bolt that allows you to turn the motor over.

Check in your manual as to what direction to turn the motor over. You do not want to turn the motor over in the wrong direction. Turn the motor over looking into the inspection (top) hole. You will notice a mark on the fly wheel. When you see this mark come around, look up at the cams. There should be two punch marks on the cam gears that line up with the gasket surface towards the outside of the head. At this point you should be at top dead center compression. Check the lobes of the cam, they should not be touching the valve buckets. If they are touching the valve buckets, this means that you are 180 degrees out of time. Rotate the motor 180 degrees and then start to measure.

After you measure the clearance between the cam lobe and the valve bucket, you will want to write that down. You will then need to check your numbers against the spec's provided in your service manual. If you are outside the specified range, you will need to remove your cams and replace the shims. There should be a chart in your manual that will help you to decide what shims you will need to bring you within the safe range. When dealing with the KXF250 or the RMZ 250, you want to make sure you use the correct shims. There are two types that will fit these bikes, but only one is the correct shim. Shims come both forged and sintered. They look the same until you put them under a magnifying glass, then the difference is very clear. The forged shims have a smooth surface, while the sintered shims have very small cavities. Using the sintered shims will prematurely wear the coating off of the valve stem. This will shorten valve life and cause the valves to go out of adjustment sooner.

Now, after replacing the shims, all that is left is to reassemble your machine. Pay closer attention to the instructions in your owners manual. Always double check your cam timing with what is recommended in the manual. Do not start your bike without turning the motor over by hand first. If you feel it is unusually hard to turn over or it will not turn over, you probably are off on your cam timing. Once again, do not try and start the bike. Go back and retime your cams.

Nov 25, 2008 | 2005 Suzuki RM-Z 250

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