Question about 1998 Land Rover Range Rover

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EAS pump problems

There is a slow leak in the lines to the system.
SO after sitting a while, my rover will be sitting all the way down. after I started it up I was able to hear the compressor come on, and after several minutes the system will fill up and the rover would go up. And I was able to drive it without any problems.
the other day I wanted to go for a ride, I started it up and waited.... only this time it never did go up. I listened for the pump to come on and could hear it come on, but after just a few seconds it would go back off. I was able to jump leads to the compressor and it works.
I was able to check the relay and the fuses under the hood; I found the timer relay under the drivers seat and they all checked out fine.
Is there another relay or sensor somewhere else that I have missed?
Is there someone who can help with an answer to this problem?

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U need to fix all the leak, if not the pump will get spoiled. and i suspect its already spoilt with the constant pumping.

Posted on Oct 20, 2008

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SOURCE: EAS pump problems

ur thermal sensor in the compressor probably tell sthe compressor to turn off. this is what happened to mine. there is a way to bypass this, go to rangerovers.net to find out how.

Posted on Sep 06, 2008

Landyman
  • 89 Answers

SOURCE: 98 Range Rover EAS pump problem

Disconnect the thin wire on the suspension pump , this is the overheat switch which sticks at times.If it's working after that use a solution of dish liquid and water and spray this all over the pipes, connectors and air springs to find your leak.

Posted on Dec 03, 2008

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1 Answer

How to solve aes problem once and for all.


For around $1000 the entire system can be changed to conventional coils, eliminating the EAS completely. You will not get as good a ride, but you will not have problems with the pump, valve block, lines or air springs either. If you want to refine the coils system one stage further, fit POLYAIR springs inside the coils

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You posted this question twice - my answer to the other post is:

For around $1000 the entire system can be changed to conventional coils, eliminating the EAS completely. You will not get as good a ride, but you will not have problems with the pump, valve block, lines or air springs either. If you want to refine the coils system one stage further, fit POLYAIR springs inside the coils

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1 Answer

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Weak/failed compressor caused by a leak in the system or a failure of one or more "bellows" or air suspension bags. These are the usual suspects. Determine if your air pump is functioning first by lifting the hood and removing the lid of the EAS valve box located on driver side against the firewall. With the engine running the pump should be engaging. If you cant hear it, the touch it but only after just starting a cool engine. This pump can get very warm or if under strain even hot so be careful. If it is working then try pressurizing the system while removing the drain. This is done simply by starting the engine and allowing it to run for a minute or two with the drivers door open. The door open will trigger the height inhibitor switch preventing air from being released from the holding tank into the four lines. [The OEM pumps (manuf. by Thompson in many p38's) are sturdy work horses and well built but the constant strain of a leak in the system prevents the pump from ever getting a break.] They overheat and internal parts then wear quickly. After a minute or two, 4 minutes max, if the pump hasnt already stopped indicating a fully pressurised system then close the driver door and see if the vehicle raises. If it does raise then your problem is most likely a leak or bad bag. This is not a major problem if caught before a lot of lights begin to flash on your EAS switches inside the vehicle. Take this as a blessing and immediately take steps to correct it. You will save a lot of money and frustration with fast action.
Hope this helps. Repost more questions and info and I will do my best to get you through to the other side. Good luck!

Oct 08, 2013 | 1999 Land Rover Range Rover

1 Answer

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I'm not aware of any reset that can be done without the Rover TextBook. If you simply want to clear the stored data, trouble codes, etc thats pretty simple. -engine off, remove negative lead from the battery (single black cable). I usually wrap this with a rubber glove or a rubber drawer toolbox liner, something rubber any way just to be on the safe side and then tuck somewhere out of the way so it doesn't springback and make unwanted contact with anything. Once your negative lead is removed many stored items will be cleared from memory. Let Rover sit with cable off for an hour or so. This will also discharge the stored power within the BECM and the ECM (Rovers brain). At this point everything that can be cleared in your garage has been cleared. There are a couple systems that I believe are not affected such as ABS and the EAS system. If you are having airshock issues this will not reset the EAS faults. Hope this helps.

Dec 24, 2012 | 1996 Land Rover Range Rover

1 Answer

I wanted to ask about the eas on my range im getting a bes fault nd i also have a right door open sign the bump stops ae terrible plz help


A number of issues can lead to an EAS fault. I will assume that you have escalated into a HARD FAULT most commonly signified by the "slow 35 mph" message on your dash. A HARD FAULT is not easily reset without the proprietary Rave diagnostic system your dealer uses. Without more details to zero in I could go on for pages with possible causes and corrections. If you are planning to chase this down yourself start by searching the web for RSW solutions and download their free (donate if you can, these guys are saints as far as I'm concerned for making this available) EAS software and follow the instructions to diagnose without a lot of tail chasing. It all starts with a leak and graduates to compressor failure. Sort this one out asap. Good luck, repost your findings/specifics for additional info and EAS repair tips.

Oct 12, 2012 | 1997 Land Rover Range Rover

1 Answer

I bought a 2000 range rover already converted to coil springs and shocks, now I have an eas fault constantly on the dash, how do I get rid of the eas system in the computer?


For many repair operations you don't want the suspension to be adjusting itself up and down while you work on the vehicle. Classic air sprung models have a disable switch under the seat, but this is lacking on the 4.0/4.6. On these models, the following options are available for disabling the system:
1. Leaving a door or the tailgate open effectively freezes the suspension
2. Unplug the air suspension delay timer, a small black box that looks like a large relay under the drivers seat.

May 03, 2012 | 2000 Land Rover Range Rover

1 Answer

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The EAS system can only be entered by using Land Rover T4 testbook , at an official dealer. There , they can check what is happening with the EAS system and then offer you a quote on how much it would cost to repair. SIT DOWN when they tell you the cost !!!
From day one, when Land rover fitted EAS systems to their cars, back in the e 80"s, they were useless, always causing problems, and very expensive to repair, but they continued to fit them to this day. If you are going to keep the car, i would strongly recommend that you have fitted a conversion kit, which consists of springs, mounting brackets etc and an electronic unit that switches off the existing system , so you dont have warning lamps illuminating, so then the suspension becomes conventional spring and shock absorber, The ride is just as good, more reliable , no electronics to play up etc. Call your local independant land rover specialist for a quote. It really is worth considering. I have converted many Range Rovers without any problem and very satisfied customers. cust Hope this helps

Jan 30, 2010 | 2004 Land Rover Range Rover

2 Answers

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There is a device called the ride height sensor, it may be damaged by letting the chassis sink down every-time you loose pressure in the system, it is what tells the control unit how much to raise the car to compensate for loads etc...

Aug 31, 2008 | 1998 Land Rover Range Rover

2 Answers

1998 range rover 4.6 HSE


firstly check which part is leaking, pipes to the air spring, the air spring, or the valve blocks. replace the faulty part, and the compressor. because the compressor is damaged already wit the constant pumping of air for the airspring. to check leak in the system use soap n water using a bottle with a spray head.

Aug 31, 2008 | 1998 Land Rover Range Rover

2 Answers

98 Range Rover EAS pump problem


Disconnect the thin wire on the suspension pump , this is the overheat switch which sticks at times.If it's working after that use a solution of dish liquid and water and spray this all over the pipes, connectors and air springs to find your leak.

Aug 31, 2008 | 1998 Land Rover Range Rover

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