Question about Chrysler 300M

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Installed new O2 sensors (part # 15705) and I keep getting a high voltage reading on my scaner from both of them.

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  • mathturtle Oct 07, 2008

    Im having the same problem. I first had the bank 2 02 sensor go bad reading low voltage. I changed it and then had the two front sensors 15705 testing high voltage I changed them and continued to get the same reading. I took the parts back and exchanged them to make sure they were good. I replaced them again and still getting the same reading. I know that it is because the fuel is running to lean but what is causing the fuel to run this lean?

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You have a rich mixture, O2 sensors ALWAYS fail lean (low, no voltage signal), the normal voltage from an O2 sensor in a system running in closed fuel loop will be varing up and down, lean, rich and so on the PCM uses the O2 output to always trying to maintain a 14.7 to 1 fuel to air ratio. Why did you replace the O2's?

Posted on Aug 29, 2008

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The check engine comes on but I dont lose power the code it is showing is sid 152.does anyone know what it is.


some codes dont cause power loss or may not even notice anything wrong but a check engine light a p0152 code means following answer courtesy of OBD-CODES.com === P0152 O2 Sensor (High Voltage) OBD-II Trouble Code Technical Description Article by Dale Dale Toalston ASE Certified Technician 02 Sensor Circuit High Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 1) What does that mean? The o2 (oxygen) sensors basically measure oxygen content in the exhaust. The PCM (powertrain control module) then uses this information to regulate fuel injector pulse. The o2 sensors are very important to proper operation of the engine. Problems with them can cause the PCM to add or take away too much fuel based on the faulty o2 sensor voltage. A P0152 code refers to the Bank 2, sensor 1, o2 sensor. (Bank 1 would contain cylinder 1 and bank 2 is the opposite bank. Bank 2 doesn't necessarily contain cylinder 2.) "Bank 2" refers to the side of the exhaust that DOES NOT contain cylinder number 1 and "Sensor 1" indicates that it is the pre-cat sensor, or forward(first) sensor on that bank. It is a four wire sensor. The PCM supplies a ground circuit and a reference voltage of about .5 volts on another circuit. Also for the o2 heater there is a battery voltage supply wire and another ground circuit for that. The o2 sensor heater allows the o2 sensor to warm up faster, thus achieving closed loop in less time than it would normally take for the exhaust to warm the sensor up to operating temperature. The O2 sensor varies the supplied reference voltage based on oxygen content in the exhaust. It is capable of varying from .1 to .9 volts, .1 indicating lean exhaust and .9 indicating rich exhaust. NOTE: A condensed explanation of fuel trims: If the o2 sensor indicates that the oxygen voltage reading is .9 volts or high, the PCM interprets this as a rich condition in the exhaust and as a result decreases the amount of fuel entering the engine by shortening injector "on time". The STFT (short term fuel trims) would reflect this change. The opposite would occur when the PCM sees a lean condition. The PCM would add fuel which would be indicated by a single digit positive STFT reading. On a normal engine the front o2 sensors switch rapidly back and forth two or three times per second and the STFT would shift positive and negative single digits to add and remove fuel to compensate at a similar rate. This little "dance" goes on to keep the air/fuel ratio at it's optimal level. Short term fuel trims or STFT reflect immediate changes in fuel injector "on-time" while long term fuel trims or LTFT reflect changes in fuel over a longer period of time. If your STFT or LTFT readings are in the positive double digits (ten or above), this indicates the fuel system has been adding an abnormal amount of fuel than is necessary to keep the proper air/fuel ratio. It may be overcompentsating for a vacuum leak or a stuck lean o2 sensor, etc. The opposite would be true if the fuel trim readings are in the negative double digits. It would indicate that the fuel system has been taking away excessive amounts of fuel, perhaps to compensate for leaking injectors or a stuck rich o2 sensor, etc. So when experiencing o2 related issues, reading your fuel trims can indicate what the PCM has been doing over the long term and short term with regard to fuel. This code indicates that the o2 sensor was stuck too high or in the rich position. The PCM monitors this voltage and if it determines that the voltage is too high out of range for too long, P0152 may set. Symptoms Symptoms may include: MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination Engine may run very rough Engine may be running lean or rich depending on if the o2 sensor is reading correctly or incorrectly Lack of power Increased fuel consumption Causes Potential causes of an P0152 code include: Bad bank 2, 1 o2 sensor incorrectly reading rich condition Engine running rich and o2 sensor Correctly reading rich condition Signal shorted to voltage in harness Wiring harness damage/melted due to contact with exhaust components Vacuum leak (make have lean codes (P0171, P0174) present with it) Leaking injectors Bad fuel pressure regulator Bad PCM Possible Solutions If you have any lean or rich codes associated with this code, focus on fixing these first because these can cause the o2 sensor voltage readings to appear to be faulty when they are in fact only reading correctly. So, with the engine running at operating temperature, use a scan tool to observe the Bank 2,1 o2 sensor voltage reading. Is it high? If so, look at the long term and short term fuel trim readings. The fuel trims are affected by the o2 sensors as noted above. If the LTFT reading for that bank is indicating negative double digits (PCM trying to take away fuel to compensate for problem) try inducing a vacuum leak to see if the sensor voltage then goes lean and the fuel trims increase. If the o2 sensor responds, suspect a problem with the engine, not the sensor. There may be other engine codes to help you. If the o2 sensor reading remains high (0.9 volts or above) and won't respond then shut off engine. With KOEO (Key on engine off) disconnect the o2 sensor and look for signs of corrosion or water intrustion. Repair as necessary. The voltage reading should now be about 0.5 volts. If so, replace the o2 sensor, it's shorted internally. If after unplugging the o2 sensor the voltage reading on the scan tool doesn't change, then suspect wiring problems. Inspect the harness and look for any melted wires or anywhere that the o2 sensor harness is making contact with the exhaust components. If you are unsure, you can check for continuity of all four wires between the sensor and the PCM with an ohmmeter. Any resistance at all indicates a problem. Repair as necessary.

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0152
Copyright © OBD-Codes.com

Jul 28, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I have a 2010 Buick Lacrosse that had the P0420 code. Replaced the Bank One Cat and the code and the check engine light came on again with the same code.


Did they use an original equipment cat from the dealer or an aftermarket one? Aftermarket cats can cause more problems than they fix. There very few that I will personally install.

are they monitoring downstream O2 sensor data to see if the O2 sensor may be biased high? If the cat is doing its job the downstream O2 sensors will read a lower voltage. Tricking the vehicle into running rich or lean will cause this voltage to change ( unplugging a coil will cause the Downstream O2 to read high as the cat tries to burn off the extra fuel. Unplugging a fuel injector will cause the downstream O2 sensor to read low as extra air is being pushed thought the cats). Making sure the downstream O2 sensors are capable of switching should be part of the diagnostics.

Are you sure they replace the right cat? There are 5 different engine options for this car. If you let me know what engine you have I can let you know what bank is bank 1.

Feb 20, 2015 | 2010 Buick LaCrosse CXL

1 Answer

Engine code p0138


no year, no joy, all i know is 1996 to 2013
no model stated,,, ouch. wrangler?
this is federal usa spec code P0 are. that.
so
O2 Oxygen Sensor Circuit High Voltage (Bank1, Sensor2)

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0138

the rear oxygen sensor (not front) is sending wrong data.
it reads too high.
this means, 1: the wires to it are cut, burnt, melted or corroded.
or the sensor is bad
i might mean the CAT is bad. (the FSM shows the trip limits.)
since no year, and no car model stated, i cant get exact.

high is 1v, we know that, but is the failure , for over 1v?
if yes, the sensor is blow to bits or not connected.

ill roll the dice (snake eyes) 1996 wrangler, 4.0L , A/T
quote:

O2 (B1 S2) Circuit Short to Voltage
Number of Trips to Set Code: 1
Trouble Code Conditions:
Engine started; engine runtime more than 4 minutes, system voltage over 10.5v, ECT Sensor more than 180?F, and the PCM detected the O2 signal was more than 1.50v for 3 seconds.
Possible Causes:
  • O2 signal tracking (wet/oily) in connector due to short from signal to power circuit
  • O2 signal circuit is open
  • O2 ground circuit is open
  • O2 is damaged or it has failed
  • PCM has failed (never,will it be ,here.....well protected , im sure.)


1.5 v is illegal reading from the 02
O2 means the natural state, of 2 Oxygen atoms. the come in pairs.

what I do is connect my scan tool and plot B1S2 02 sensor
if it reads wrong, i clean and check connections.
ifi it still reads wrong its kicked to the curb (a new one)

hand wired i can get them for $20
PNP from Bosch $50 (plug it in, and play)



Nov 28, 2013 | Jeep Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Problem with ford explorer v8 reading high voltage a sensor 1 bank 1


Clear the computer. Then if the reading is still high, you may have to replace the wire or the sensor. I don't have the specs for the O2 sensor available, could be sensor was bad and you happened to catch the connector problem but did not find the cause of your woes.

Now some O2 wiring has resistor properties, so shortening will change feedback value. Just fixing a pin connector should be okay. Also, the O2 sensor can sometimes have a micro cooling tube moulded into the wires. This type of O2 has its own heating element and vents excess heat through microtube. Try new O2.

Nov 20, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Has any one had problems with bosh oxagen sensor not working properly


Hi there:
Are you buy same or OE part replacement according with the Hyundai part number catalogue? This is important. Keep in midn that you need reset or delete all previous code stored in the car computer.


DTC P0131 - Oxygen O2 Sensor Circuit Low Voltage (Bank 1, Sensor 1)
Essentially the same as P0136 and P0137, a P0131 code refers to the first oxygen sensor on Bank 1. P0131 means the O2 oxygen sensor's voltage remained low for longer than 2 minutes. This, is interpreted by the ECM as a low voltage condition and sets the MIL. Bank 1 Sensor 1 is located in front of the catalytic converter.


There may be no visible symptoms to the driver, other than the MIL (Check Engine / Service Engine Soon) illumination.


A code P0131 may mean that one or more of the following has happened:
- Faulty o2 oxygen sensor
- Short to voltage on O2 signal circuit
- High resistance or open on O2 signal circuit


Possible Solutions:
- Replace faulty sensor
- Repair short, open, or high resistance on o2 signal circuit


Now, about DTC P0135 - Oxygen O2 Sensor Heater Circuit Malfunction (Bank 1, Sensor 1)


A code P0135 may mean that one or more of the following has happened:
- O2 Heater element resistance is high
- Internal short or open in the heater element
- O2 heater circuit wiring high resistance
- open or short to ground in the wiring harness


Possible Solutions
Repair short or open or high resistance in wiring harness or harness connectors
Replace oxygen sensor (cannot repair open or short that occurs internally to sensor)


Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Aug 17, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Error codes po152 and po442


Hi there:
DTC P0152 - 02 Sensor Circuit High Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 1)
The o2 (oxygen) sensors basically measure oxygen content in the exhaust. The PCM (powertrain control module) then uses this information to regulate fuel injector pulse. The o2 sensors are very important to proper operation of the engine. Problems with them can cause the PCM to add or take away too much fuel based on the faulty o2 sensor voltage.

A P0152 code refers to the Bank 2, sensor 1, o2 sensor. (Bank 1 would contain cylinder 1 and bank 2 is the opposite bank. Bank 2 doesn't necessarily contain cylinder 2.) "Bank 2" refers to the side of the exhaust that DOES NOT contain cylinder number 1 and "Sensor 1" indicates that it is the pre-cat sensor, or forward(first) sensor on that bank. It is a four wire sensor. The PCM supplies a ground circuit and a reference voltage of about .5 volts on another circuit. Also for the o2 heater there is a battery voltage supply wire and another ground circuit for that. The o2 sensor heater allows the o2 sensor to warm up faster, thus achieving closed loop in less time than it would normally take for the exhaust to warm the sensor up to operating temperature.
The O2 sensor varies the supplied reference voltage based on oxygen content in the exhaust. It is capable of varying from .1 to .9 volts, .1 indicating lean exhaust and .9 indicating rich exhaust. NOTE: A condensed explanation of fuel trims: If the o2 sensor indicates that the oxygen voltage reading is .9 volts or high, the PCM interprets this as a rich condition in the exhaust and as a result decreases the amount of fuel entering the engine by shortening injector "on time". The STFT (short term fuel trims) would reflect this change. The opposite would occur when the PCM sees a lean condition. The PCM would add fuel which would be indicated by a single digit positive STFT reading. On a normal engine the front o2 sensors switch rapidly back and forth two or three times per second and the STFT would shift positive and negative single digits to add and remove fuel to compensate at a similar rate. This little "dance" goes on to keep the air/fuel ratio at it's optimal level. Short term fuel trims or STFT reflect immediate changes in fuel injector "on-time" while long term fuel trims or LTFT reflect changes in fuel over a longer period of time. If your STFT or LTFT readings are in the positive double digits (ten or above), this indicates the fuel system has been adding an abnormal amount of fuel than is necessary to keep the proper air/fuel ratio. It may be overcompentsating for a vacuum leak or a stuck lean o2 sensor, etc. The opposite would be true if the fuel trim readings are in the negative double digits. It would indicate that the fuel system has been taking away excessive amounts of fuel, perhaps to compensate for leaking injectors or a stuck rich o2 sensor, etc. So when experiencing o2 related issues, reading your fuel trims can indicate what the PCM has been doing over the long term and short term with regard to fuel.
This code indicates that the o2 sensor was stuck too high or in the rich position. The PCM monitors this voltage and if it determines that the voltage is too high out of range for too long, P0152 may set.

Symptoms may include:MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illuminationEngine may run very roughEngine may be running lean or rich depending on if the o2 sensor is reading correctly or incorrectlyLack of powerIncreased fuel consumption

Potential causes of an P0152 code include:Bad bank 2, 1 o2 sensor incorrectly reading rich conditionEngine running rich and o2 sensorCorrectly reading rich conditionSignal shorted to voltage in harnessWiring harness damage/melted due to contact with exhaust componentsVacuum leak (make have lean codes (P0171, P0174) present with it)Leaking injectorsBad fuel pressure regulatorBad PCM

Possible Solutions:If you have any lean or rich codes associated with this code, focus on fixing these first because these can cause the o2 sensor voltage readings to appear to be faulty when they are in fact only reading correctly.
So, with the engine running at operating temperature, use a scan tool to observe the Bank 2,1 o2 sensor voltage reading. Is it high? If so, look at the long term and short term fuel trim readings. The fuel trims are affected by the o2 sensors as noted above. If the LTFT reading for that bank is indicating negative double digits (PCM trying to take away fuel to compensate for problem) try inducing a vacuum leak to see if the sensor voltage then goes lean and the fuel trims increase. If the o2 sensor responds, suspect a problem with the engine, not the sensor. There may be other engine codes to help you.
If the o2 sensor reading remains high (0.9 volts or above) and won't respond then shut off engine. With KOEO (Key on engine off) disconnect the o2 sensor and look for signs of corrosion or water intrustion. Repair as necessary. The voltage reading should now be about 0.5 volts. If so, replace the o2 sensor, it's shorted internally.
If after unplugging the o2 sensor the voltage reading on the scan tool doesn't change, then suspect wiring problems. Inspect the harness and look for any melted wires or anywhere that the o2 sensor harness is making contact with the exhaust components. If you are unsure, you can check for continuity of all four wires between the sensor and the PCM with an ohmmeter. Any resistance at all indicates a problem. Repair as necessary.

DTC P0442 - Evaporative Emission Control System Leak Detected (small leak)
This indicates a fuel vapor leak in the EVAP control system. It means a very small leak has been detected. In fact, the leak can be from a hole as small as 0.04" in diameter. The (EVAP) emission control system prevents the escape of fuel vapors from a vehicle's fuel system. Fuel vapors are routed by hoses to a charcoal canister for storage. Later, when the engine is running a purge control valve opens allowing intake vacuum to siphon the fuel vapors into the engine.


A code P0442 most likely means one or more of the following has happened:A loose or improperly affixed gas capA non-conforming gas cap (i.e. not factory/original brand)A small leak/hole in a fuel vapor hose/tubeOther small leak in EVAP systemFaulty vent o-ring seal

With a P0442, the most common repair is to:Remove and reinstall the gas cap, clear the codes, and drive for a day and see if the codes come back.Otherwise, replace the gas cap, orInspect the EVAP system for cuts/holes in tubes/hoses

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Mar 28, 2012 | 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

I am getting a high voltage code on my 07 avalanche, why?


If your dash Voltmeter is reading high, then the Regulator is bad. The Alternator is capable of more than the 14.2Volts output, but the Regulator is what is keeping the high voltage in check.

But if this is about other electrical parts, then check for burnt resistor wiring that is grounding. Sometimes O2 sensors shortout, they have heaters built in them to quicken Emissions regulation. But the O2 sensor operates at a lower base Voltage range and when they short, they get the full charge.

Jan 28, 2012 | Chevrolet Avalanche Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a code po156 what is this


Causes

Potential causes of an P0156 code include:

  • Bad O2 sensor
  • Signal shorted to voltage
  • Wiring problems due to contact with exhaust components
  • Holes in exhaust near o2 sensor
Possible Solutions

If you have access to a scan tool, check the signal voltage for the Bank 2,2 oxygen sensor with the engine at normal operating temperature. Is it stuck low currently? If so, increase RPM for a few seconds and see if it affects the reading. If it begins working with increased RPM, check for holes in the exhaust near the o2 sensor that may cause a false lean. If the exhaust pipe is intact, the sensor is sluggish, replace it.

If the Bank 2,2 o2 sensor voltage reading remains low with increased RPM, unplug it and then observe the reading. It should have increased to about 0.5 volts or thereabouts. If it did, check for water intrusion or other connector problems. If none are found, replace the shorted o2 sensor. If the voltage reading is still stuck low after unplugging the sensor, then suspect a wiring problem. Using a voltmeter, with the o2 sensor unplugged, check for voltage on the signal circuit at the o2 sensor connector(PCM side). It can vary with model, but should be about 0.5 volts and not above 1 volt. If the voltage reading is too high, repair short to voltage on signal circuit. If the signal voltage checks out, suspect the PCM.

Aug 16, 2011 | 2001 Dodge Stratus

1 Answer

What do i have to change if codes po1151 and po155 come up on my 1999 lincoln town car?


P0155 - 02 Sensor Heater Circuit Malfunction (Bank 2 Sensor 1)
This code refers to the front oxygen sensor on Bank 2. The heated circuit in the oxygen sensor decreases time needed to enter closed loop. As the O2 heater reaches operating temperature, the oxygen sensor responds by switching according to oxygen content of the exhaust surrounding it. The ECM tracks how long it takes for the oxygen sensor to begin switching. It the ECM determines (based on coolant temp) that too much time elapsed before the oxygen sensor began operating properly, it will set P0155. See also: P0135 (Bank 1).

Potential Symptoms: You will likely notice poor fuel economy the illumination of the MIL.

Causes: A code P0155 may mean that one or more of the following has happened:
O2 Heater element resistance is high
Internal short or open in the heater element
O2 heater circuit wiring high resistance
open or short to ground in the wiring harness

Possible Solutions:
Repair short or open or high resistance in wiring harness or harness connectors
Replace oxygen sensor (cannot repair open or short that occurs internally to sensor)



P0156 - 02 Sensor Circuit Malfunction (Bank 2 Sensor 2)
The o2 (oxygen) sensors measure oxygen content in the exhaust. The PCM (powertrain control module) then uses this information to regulate fuel injector pulse. The o2 sensors are very important for the proper operation of the engine. Innacurate or faulty o2 sensors can cause the PCM to add or take away fuel based on the faulty o2 sensor voltage which can cause a host of problems.

A P0156 code refers to the Bank 2,2 o2 sensor or the downstream (post-cat) o2 sensor on Bank 2. It is a four wire sensor. The PCM supplies a ground circuit and a reference voltage circuit of about 0.5 volts. Also for the o2 sensor heater element there is a battery voltage supply wire and another ground circuit for that. The o2 sensor heater allows the o2 sensor to warm up faster, thus achieving closed loop in less time than it would normally take for the exhaust to warm the sensor up to operating temperature. The O2 sensor varies the supplied reference voltage based on oxygen content in the exhaust. It is capable of varying from about 0.1 to 0.9 volts, 0.1 V indicating lean exhaust and 0.9 V indicating rich exhaust. This P0156 code indicates that the Bank 2, 2 o2 sensor is stuck low for too long or isn\'t active at all.

Symptoms: Often post-cat o2 sensor problems present few symptoms since they are inputs to the PCM to monitor catalytic converter quality and don\'t directly control fuel. sometimes no symptoms are noticeable. However the following may be possible on some vehicles:
MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
Decrease in MPG
Increase in tailpipe emissions

Causes: Potential causes of an P0156 code include:
Bad O2 sensor
Signal shorted to voltage
Wiring problems due to contact with exhaust components
Holes in exhaust near o2 sensor

Possible Solutions:
If you have access to a scan tool, check the signal voltage for the Bank 2,2 oxygen sensor with the engine at normal operating temperature. Is it stuck low currently? If so, increase RPM for a few seconds and see if it affects the reading. If it begins working with increased RPM, check for holes in the exhaust near the o2 sensor that may cause a false lean. If the exhaust pipe is intact, the sensor is sluggish, replace it.

If the Bank 2,2 o2 sensor voltage reading remains low with increased RPM, unplug it and then observe the reading. It should have increased to about 0.5 volts or thereabouts. If it did, check for water intrusion or other connector problems. If none are found, replace the shorted o2 sensor. If the voltage reading is still stuck low after unplugging the sensor, then suspect a wiring problem. Using a voltmeter, with the o2 sensor unplugged, check for voltage on the signal circuit at the o2 sensor connector(PCM side). It can vary with model, but should be about 0.5 volts and not above 1 volt. If the voltage reading is too high, repair short to voltage on signal circuit. If the signal voltage checks out, suspect the PCM.


Hope this helps (remember to rate this answer).

Jun 06, 2011 | Lincoln Town Car Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2005 toyota tacoma 2.7 code p0037 replace rear 02 and computer code keep coming back.


P0037 - O2 Oxygen Sensor Circuit High Voltage (Bank1, Sensor2)

The Heated Oxygen Sensor (2) located rear of catalytic converter produces an output signal relative to oxygen storage capacity of catalytic converter. Ho2S 2 signal is less active than signal produced by front oxygen sensor. This code sets when HO2 Sensor voltage is greater than 999 mV for more than 2 minutes (time depends on model. Could be as high as 4 minutes)

Symptoms: There may be no noticeable symptoms except for MIL illumination. Possible high fuel pressure can over rich the system.

Causes: A code P0138 may mean that one or more of the following has happened:
* Faulty O2 sensor
* Short to battery voltage in O2 sensor signal circuit
* High fuel pressure (not as likely)


Here are some potential solutions:
* Replace O2 sensor
* Repair short to battery voltage in o2 sensor signal circuit

If you replaced the O2 sensor, then its possible that you have some electrical problem there; reset the codes first, and if this come on again, check in this link TSB P0037 electrical diagnostic procedure.

Keep us updated.

Jan 27, 2011 | 2005 Toyota Tacoma

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