Question about 2002 Honda Civic

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Cam sensor After replacing the timing belt my son left the cam sensor lose, now I need to tighten the cam sensor but I have not been able to find out what the clearance should be.

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Well most cam sensors are set at an exact location no adjustment, but if you havent got a repair manual for the specific car you are working on then .050 inches is normally the clearance on cam sensors. So try hat and let me know how ya did... Hope that does it for ya

Posted on Sep 14, 2008

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Can you help me with the timing on isuzu 4jk 1 engine


I could explain to you how to mechanical time the engine .
The problem is the crank and cam shafts are driven by a rubber belt
When that belt wares out it is a ware part you lose the timing for the engine .
Both the crank shaft and the cam shaft have to spin at the same wright .This is what the crank shaft position sensor and the cam shaft sensor are all about .
You need a new belt

Jul 08, 2016 | Isuzu Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

What are tools required/procedure for adjusting tappets?


A good feeler gauge set and a basic set of sockets, wrenches, and a screw driver set will work for most engines. I hope this helps. Rod
Now first you check the clearance and record the clearances. If they are out you need to change the valve bucket (which comes in different sizes). This involves removing the camshaft to change the buckets and then reassemble and recheck the clearances. This is a big job and dealerships will often charge $1500 plus to do this job. I am going to post some info from a thread which will explain further. Many motorcycles are similar as well.

The general procedure for checking and adjusting the clearance based on having done this on bikes is;
Before removing old belt
Measure and record each intake and exhaust valve clearance using feelers gauges. Use the crank rotation sequence and measurement order listed in the manual, else you may get erroneous readings due to cam journal clearances and the valve springs pushing the cam around in the bearings. Some are not measured on the exact base of the cam (i.e suzuki)
Compare the readings to specification
If any are out of tol, calculate the difference between the reading and spec.
Remove the camshaft with the out of tolerance readings (usually both if one is out of tol).
Record the markings on the bottom of the buckets that are out of tolerance. (I usually like to measure these with a mike to verify markings and or determine if there is any measurable wear and adjust accordingly)
Refer to the list of available bucket sizes (from svc. manual or dealer parts counter)
Add or subtract the difference you calculated above to determine your new bucket size. (bikes typically tighten up so you end up going with a thinner shim, er bucket)
Order the buckets needed (sometimes you can swap them around between locations to minimize the qty needed to order).
Install new buckets in the proper locations.
Re-install cams, new belt, new tensioners, and new Idlers.
Repeat measurement process from above.
If measurements are in spec, you are done.
If not, repeat.

Last winter I checked the valve clearance on a 2001 Focus ZX3 with the 2.0L DOHC engine. It had about 85K on it. The clearances were all pretty close to nominal. I don't know the history on the car since new so they may have been adjusted at some time in its life. IIRC the interval for that car was 75K.

As I said above, bikes typically tighten up with this type of valve train. This is due to the valves seating deeper in the valve seats due to wear. This increases the installed height of the valve, decreasing the clearance to the cam. The rate of seat wear exceeds all other wear causing them to tighten.

Tight valves are worse than loose valves. Can eventually lead to low compression, and burnt valves.

If the wear of the cam, bucket, cam journal exceed that of the valve seat, the clearance will increase.

I don't know what the general trend on these engines are as far as tightening or loosening, but if they are like a bike, they will tighten.

I can tell you that on bikes if they are operated a significant amount of time near the red line, they will require more frequent adjustment compared to one operated more conservatively. A bike that is operated conservatively may not need any adjustment at the first inspection interval (not unusual for my Yamaha FZ1, 26,000 mile interval)

Sorry about being long winded, but I thought I would do a brain dump to help people understand the process.

I hope this helps. Rod

Aug 17, 2015 | 2008 Saturn Astra XE

1 Answer

1997 tacoma 2.7 cam sensor problem replaced it but still code p0340 so tryed crank sensor


There may be more than one issue. Here's some possibilities:
1. The new sensor you bought is defective. I have run across this problem a few times. Most notably was a mass air sensor for a Maxima that the first 3 NEW sensors were defective right out of the box.
2.Look for oil in the sensors plug socket and the pigtail connector. If oil is present, spray out both the socket and pigtail with brake cleaner. (Be sure to wear safety glasses when doing this)
3. The timing belt tensioner is losing/has lost the ability to keep tension on the timing belt and it's out of time.
4. There's a break or a sort in the wiring. You'll need a schematic and a mutlmeter to check for continuity.
(Least likely) 5. The computer is failing or has failed.

Apr 21, 2013 | 1997 Toyota Tacoma

1 Answer

Ba v8 falcon ute missing and stalling at idle like flooding runs well over 2000 rpm


timing belt may need to be tighten,need to check valve tappet clearance,set perfect timing,clean all sensors in manifolds

Mar 01, 2012 | 2005 Ford Falcon 4.0

1 Answer

I have changed the camshaft position senson several times on my 05 Neon and now replacing it doesnt do any good. im getting an intermittent camshaft positon circuit error. how do I test the wiring and what...


I never had a problem with the cam sensor in my neon, drove it for 10 years. However, the O2 Sensor fault tends to send a signal that a bad Cam sensor is present and if the timing belt is lose or jumps that will send a false code. The timing belt on these uses a spring tension device in the 2000 to 2003 and a hydraulic tension arm in the 2003 and later models. The hydraulic tension assembly tends to hang and allows the timing to be erratic. Not enough to throw it off all the time, apparently when the belt pops it comes free, but that is all it takes to through the cam timing off and that causes the computer to send a fault signal or random misfire signal. Look at the Timing belt after replacing the O2 sensor if the O2 replacement doesn't resolve the problem.

May 21, 2011 | 2005 Dodge Neon

2 Answers

When motor is running it making a loud tapping noise in the cam and motor has kicked back a few times when starting it and i think cam belt is a bit loose


Either tighten the cam belt to the correct tension or replace it if the belt is the problem. However another problem could be that the valve gaps need checking. you would do this by removing the rocker cover and checking the valve gaps when each valve is fully OPEN , you would use feeler guages and you would find the correct valve clearance by referring to the handbook for the vehicle adjust accordingly if needed.

Feb 03, 2011 | Mazda 626 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Can you explain how to replace a cam shaft censor on my 300m 99


Welcome to FIxYa.com


The camshaft position sensor is installed in the timing belt housing cover above the left camshaft sprocket.

Removal:

1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.

2. Remove the upper intake plenum.

3. Disconnect electrical connector from sensor.

4. Remove camshaft position sensor bolt.

5. Pull sensor up out of the timing belt housing.



Installation:

If the removed sensor is reinstalled, remove the old spacer from the sensor face, Attach a

new spacer to the face of the sensor.



If installing a new sensor be sure that the paper spacer is attached to the face.

1. Install sensor in the timing belt housing and push down until contact is made with the camshaft sprocket. While holding down in position, install and tighten bolt to 12 N.m(105in.lbs) torque.

Hook up electrical connector.

Connect Negative battery back up.

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Regards, Lee Davidian


Thank you for using FixYa.com

Nov 05, 2010 | 1999 Chrysler 300M

1 Answer

Hi, I am looking for a timing belt diagram for a 1998 2.5ltr Subaru Outback or can you tell me which timing marks on the sprockets line up to the encasing.


Timing Belt Cover, Belt & Sprockets Removal & Installation 2.5L Engine To Remove:
  1. Remove the drive belts.
  2. Remove the A/C compressor drive belt tensioner. Timing belt & cover DOHC exploded view subaru-03-25-6470.gif

  3. Remove the crankshaft pulley.
  4. Remove the mounting bolts and left timing belt cover.
  5. Remove the mounting bolts and right timing belt cover.
  6. Remove the mounting bolts and front timing belt cover.
  7. Vehicles W/ M/T: Remove the timing belt guide.
  8. Ensure that the timing belt rotation arrows are still visible. If the marks are worn off, place new rotation marks on the belt. Timing belt alignment marks DOHC subaru-03-25-6472.gif

  9. Turn the crankshaft using a breaker bar and special adapter socket on the crankshaft. Align the timing mark on the crankshaft sprocket (1), left intake sprocket (2), left exhaust sprocket (3), right intake sprocket (4) and right exhaust sprocket (5) with the notches in cylinder block and timing belt cover.
  10. Paint alignment marks on the timing belt at the crankshaft and camshaft sprockets timing marks. CAUTION
    Do not turn the camshaft sprockets with the timing belt removed. The valves heads will contact each other causing the valve stems to bend.
  11. Remove the lower right idler pulley.
  12. Remove the timing belt.
  13. Remove the upper right idler pulley.
  14. Remove the lower left (toothed) idler pulley.
  15. Remove the belt tensioner.
  16. Hold the sprocket and remove the left intake and exhaust camshafts.
  17. Hold the sprocket and remove the right intake and exhaust camshafts.
  18. Remove the crankshaft sprocket.
To Install:
  1. Install the crankshaft sprocket.
  2. Hold the sprocket and install the right intake and exhaust camshafts with the mounting bolts. Tighten 58 ft-lb (78 Nm).
  3. Hold the sprocket and install the left intake and exhaust camshafts with the mounting bolts. Tighten 58 ft-lb (78 Nm).
  4. Reset the automatic belt tensioner as follows:
    • Remove the mounting bolt and belt tensioner. NOTE: Do not exceed more than 2,205 lb. (9,807 N).
    • Place the belt tensioner on a press. Press the adjuster rod down gradually (using more than 3 minutes) 66- lb (165 N) or more until the adjuster rod is aligned with the stop pin hole in the cylinder.
    • Insert a 0.08 in (2 mm) diameter pin or hex wrench into the pin hole to lock the adjuster rod.
    • Install the automatic belt tension adjuster with the mounting bolt. Tighten 18 ft-lb (25 Nm).
  5. Install the lower left (toothed) idler pulley. Tighten 29 ft-lb (39 Nm).
  6. Install the upper right idler pulley with the mounting bolt. Tighten 29 ft-lb (39 Nm). Crankshaft sprocket and oil pump cover alignment marks 2.5L DOHC subaru-03-25-4890.gif

  7. Align the timing mark on the crankshaft sprocket with the mark on the oil pump cover. Timing belt alignment marks DOHC subaru-03-25-6472.gif

  8. Align the single timing mark on the right exhaust camshaft sprocket with the notch on the timing belt cover.
  9. When the single timing mark on the right exhaust camshaft sprocket is aligned with the notch on the timing belt cover, ensure that the double lines on the intake camshaft and exhaust camshaft sprockets are aligned.
  10. Align the single timing mark on the left exhaust camshaft sprocket with the notch on the timing belt cover by turning the sprocket counter clockwise (viewed from front of engine).
  11. Ensure that the double lines on the intake camshaft and exhaust camshaft sprockets are aligned when the single timing mark on the left exhaust camshaft sprocket is aligned with the notch on the timing belt cover. CAUTION
    • The camshafts can be rotated independently causing the valves heads to contact each other resulting in bent valve stems.
    • When the timing belt is removed the camshafts will turn to the lowest cam lobe position by the force of the valve springs. Before installing the timing belt the 4 camshafts are in the lowest lift position (valves closed).
    • When the camshafts are rotated to install the timing belts, # 2 intake and # 4 exhaust cam lobes of the left camshafts are held to push their corresponding valves down. In this position, these valves are held in the open position. Right camshafts are held so their cam lobes do not push the valves down.
    • The left camshafts must be rotated from the lowest lobe position to the position where the timing belt can be installed at the smallest possible angle in order to prevent intake and exhaust valve contact. Camshaft sprockets rotation subaru-03-25-6473.gif

    • Do not turn the camshafts in the direction shown in the illustration because the valves will open at the same time and contact each other.
    CAUTION
    If the timing belt alignment is off the mark buy more than 3 teeth, the valves and pistons may have contact.
    Timing belt alignment marks DOHC subaru-03-25-6472.gif

  12. Align the timing marks on the belt with the marks on the sprockets in the numerical order shown in the illustration.
  13. Install the lower right idler pulley with the mounting bolt. Tighten 29 ft-lb (39 Nm).
  14. Ensure that the timing mark alignment is correct and remove the tensioner stop pin.
  15. Vehicles W/ M/T: Install the timing belt guide and temporarily tighten the mounting bolts.
  16. Vehicles W/ M/T: Measure the clearance between the guide and timing belt. The clearance should measure 0.039 ± 0.020 in (1.0 ± 0.5 mm).
  17. Vehicles W/ M/T: Tighten the guide bolts 7.2 ft-lb (9.8 Nm).
  18. Install and secure the front timing belt cover with the mounting bolts.
  19. Install and secure the right timing belt cover with the mounting bolts.
  20. Install and secure the left timing belt cover with the mounting bolts.
  21. Install the crankshaft pulley.
  22. Install the A/C compressor drive belt tensioner.
  23. Install the drive belts.
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Sep 30, 2010 | Subaru Outback Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How do you replace a timing belt on a 96 kia sportage?


its a long process. if automatic with ac you must leave radiator on. whick doesnt give you any room but take off the fan, fan shroud and big pully. remove thermostat, must replace termostat housing gasket! 1.99 at oreillys. remove timing cover and finally the timing belt. you must time it just right or will not start. left cam is INTAKE so the I should be straight up at 12 o'clock you;ll see a notch for each cam, right side is EXHAUST so the E should be straight up at 12 o'clock. move tensioner pully to the left and lock by tightening the bolt. as you hold the intkae cam in place have someone else hold the exhaust cam in place both with right size wrenchs. put timing belt on correctly and keep tension on belt. losen tensioner pully and loc it back in place. put every thing on and start.

Oct 01, 2009 | 1996 Kia Sportage

1 Answer

Quick Question...


its a long process. if automatic with ac you must leave radiator on. whick doesnt give you any room but take off the fan, fan shroud and big pully. remove thermostat, must replace termostat housing gasket! 1.99 at oreillys. remove timing cover and finally the timing belt. you must time it just right or will not start. left cam is INTAKE so the I should be straight up at 12 o'clock you;ll see a notch for each cam, right side is EXHAUST so the E should be straight up at 12 o'clock. move tensioner pully to the left and lock by tightening the bolt. as you hold the intkae cam in place have someone else hold the exhaust cam in place both with right size wrenchs. put timing belt on correctly and keep tension on belt. losen tensioner pully and loc it back in place. put every thing on and start.

Dec 06, 2008 | 1996 Kia Sportage

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