Question about Mitsubishi Lancer

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The contact area of pads to disc(the area wiped clean) is different on same axle set,though pads seem fitted correctly on my fto.

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Make sure the rotor is fully and properly seated on the hub. I had this issue on my Audi, and I took the rotors off, sprayed everything down with brake cleaner (hub surface and the inner part of the rotors where they mate to the hub), scrubbed them with a stainless steel brush, and reseated everything - that solved the issue.

Posted on Aug 22, 2008

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Brake light and abs light on. I start engine, step on peddle,it goes to floor, then light go out and brakes ok


It could be a faulty brake master cylinder though your description does remind me of a car that had the disc pads wrongly fitted and the anti-rattle springs were pushing the pads away from the discs instead of providing resistance.

A similar symptom can be experienced when a wheel bearing has excess free play and pushes the pads away from the disc.

I would use a hose clamp and isolate each brake in turn until the brake pedal operation is normal. If no clamping operation makes a significant difference I would then clamp two, three and then four hoses when if there is still no difference I would suspect the master cylinder or the basic brake pedal and servo adjustments.

Sep 21, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Now I've changed rubber brake hose and hard line to the T on rear axle, bled system and left rear brake still drags. All new pads and rotors all around and new calipers in rear. And great pedal.


the callipers actually slide on two pins that are part of the mount to the axle. this sliding action allows the callipers to centralize over the rotor disc
if you are experiencing a dragging brake then remove the pads and see if you can slide the calliper on those pins
if not you will have to remove the pins and clean the rust and gunk out of the holes in the calliper
they do rust up and seize which gives dragging brakes especially after fitting new pads.

Jun 30, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

4 Answers

This is a general question: New brake rotors and drums are usually delivered with some kind of antirust coating. It can be a thin layer of oil, or some primer type paint. I was told, before installing...


Remove the oil or any other coating on the surface's where the brake shoes or pads make contact. This area should be cleaned before installing brake shoes/pads. As for the sand paper for the surface, it is a good idea to lightly sand the contact surface, but just lightly. What is also important is applying anti squeal to the backside (metal side) of the brake pad before installing, and also apply a small bit of grease where the brake shoe hits the backing plate (high spot on the backing plate, there is most likely four raised areas total for each side) on the rear brake assembly....just a small amount will keep the rears from making noise also.

Feb 17, 2011 | Chrysler Neon Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

1994 dodge 2500 diesel. Put remanfactored calipers and new hoses on the front of this truck. Now I have a soft pedal that if held fades to the floor. Thought the master cyl must have a leak in it. Replaced...


Hi,
sound as if you really do have a problem!
From your description I presume that you are confident in doing your own work?
The quickest way to check your system is to use brake hose clamps to isolate each section of the braking system. I would suggest that you rent or buy a set of the clamps.

Put the truck on axle stands and make sure it's safely secured. ]
If possible have an assistant to sit in the cab and depress the brake pedal on your instructions.
Place a brake hose clamp on both front brake hoses and the rear axle hose.
Depress the brake pedal firmly.
The pedal should have minimum movement, and be rock-solid and you should not be able to depress it further.
If the pedal does go down when you apply it, the likely reason is that the Brake Master Cyl is by-passing internally, ie, only one section is active.

You stated that the M/C had been replaced. so we shall presume that the brake pedal is rock hard.
Go to the rear brake hose clamp and release it. Instruct your assistant to depress the brake pedal. If the brake pedal moves a significant distance, then (a) your rear brake shoes require adjustment (b) rhere is a leaking brake cyl, (check for brake fluid in the drum) or (c) you have a "lazy' or a piston (s) which have siezed during a brake actuation. That problem will require removing the rear brake drums for further inspection. Not the problem? Then adjust the rear brakes if required, then depress the brake pedal again. The downward travel should now be noticeably reduced.

If all is well at the rear brakes. refit the brake hose clamp. Go to the passengers side front brake and have your assistant apply the footbrake. Pedal rockhard/minimun movement? Release the brake hose clamp whilst your assist has pressure on the pedal. spin the front wheel by hand, and note if (a) the brake pedal has excessive downward travel. (b) the brake pads are contacting the brake disc, (the wheel will cease rotating and you will hear the pads contact the disc.)

Pedal displays limited downward travel and pads contact disc? Refit the brake hose clamp and go to drivers side brake and follow the same procedure. If the pedal has excessive downward travel then you have found your inital problem.

If releasing both front brake hose clamps results in excessive brake pedal travel, then the problem will be easier to address if you deal with one side first, complete the resolution, test by using the brake hose clamps, then start / complete the other faulty brake.

Whichever side you start to work on, be methodical, boring as it sounds.
remove the road wheel, but before doing so, place a hand on the top and bottom of the tyre and rock the wheel away from you and check the bearing play. If memory serves me correctly, that year Dodge has the discs in one piece with the hub.

You have removed the wheel. Now, have your assistant turn the steering onto full right lock. Before continuing, I would like to remind you that the vehicle is up on axle stands and you have secured it safely, in order to conform with accepted safety parameters, correct?

The steering is now on full right lock and you can see both disc pads. Now, very carefully check the position of the caliper in relation to the disc pads. Is there and equal spacing on each side? Now, have your assistant release the brake pedal and very carefully observe the travel of the disc pad pistons. They should retract and the hub should turn freely by hand. A very light drag is allowed between disc pad and disc, but it should NOT be discernible when you rotate the hub by hand.

With no pressure on the brake pedal, and using an appropriate tool, attempt to have the caliper pistons retract into their cylinders / bores. Completed? Use caution as it is very easy to break / damage a disc by using undue force when retracting the pistons.

There is now an obvious gap between disc pads and disc (or rotor..sorry) Now, carefully check that the pad guide pins are not deformed and that the pads ride easily on them. if a pad jams when the brakes are applied, then, when the piston retracts, when force is removed from the brake pedal. There is an appreciable gap to close, upon the next application of the brakes!

Some types of disc pad retaining /guide pins are a tight fit, and it is very easy to tilt a pad when fitting the pins, causing the disc pad to fail to retract fully, and again, displayed by a brake pedal with excessive travel.

When the brake pedal is applied, the brake fluid has to fill the caliper piston bores, then exert pressure on the piston to force it against the disc pads, and they in turn are forced into contact with the disc. If the piston has to move an appreciable distance before contacting the disc pad, that takes more brake fluid to fill the bore of the piston, and the master cylinder piston has to travel further,resulting in a brake pedal that displays excessive travel .

I notice that you did not mention the type of effort or number of applications of the brake pedal which resulted in a firm pedal.

If you fitted replacement calipers, can I presume that you fitted new guide pins to the calipers?
Last but not least, (a) are they the correct calipers for the vehicle as regards piston bore size? The brake Master cyl will not be able to fill the bores of the calipers with enough fluid to drive the pistons out to apply the disc pads, if the bores are oversized. The pedal will also display excessive travel.
(b) If the brake master cyl is overfilled, when the brakes are applied, the master cyl will force fluid to the calipers, expand the caliper pistons, but will be unable to release the application to the pistons due to the fluid being unable to return to the master cyl as the allotted reservoir space has been filled with static fluid. When the brake pedal is depressed again, the Master cyl cannot service the caliper pistons on the first stroke as the pistons are locked at full stroke / travel in the bores, resulting in the brake pedal going to the floor, or giving that impression.
HOWEVER, that condition, if the vehicle is driven any distance, will result in the obvious odor of overheated disc brake pads, and the vehicle struggling to display any state of acceleration.
(c) Are they in fact the correct disc brake pads? It would be wise to remove a guide / retainer pin and check for free movement of the pad on the remaining pin. All ok, then refit the pin which you removed and test again. The pads have to be free to move on the pins, and thus align themselves with the face of the disc / rotor when the brakes are applied. Some people coat the pins with never-seeze or hi-temp grease when fitting them, others prefer them to be dry.

In closing, I would recommend that you check the full travel AND RETRACTION of the caliper pistons in their respective bores. It is not unknown for re-built / new parts to be defective.

It would be interesting to hear if any of the above proved to be beneficial in resolving your problem.

Jan 27, 2011 | 1994 Dodge Ram

1 Answer

How can ichange the disc brakes on a renault 19


Hi there, I have a few steps here to help you out:
  • With your hand brake ON, loosen the wheel bolts to hand tight, jack up front wheel, chock back wheels, and put axle stands/blocks in place (just in case) .
  • Remove wheel. Disconnect pad wear wire, it pulls out of the connector.
  • Remove lower caliper bolt (at the back of caliper at the bottom), need a 13mm ring spanner for head of bolt and 17mm to stop it spinning
  • Use a screw driver between the back of the outer pad and the caliper to raise the caliper back away from the back of outer pad. Pivot caliper upwards to rest on top of wheel disc (good idea to tie it up with some wire) .
  • Remove and discard old pads , clean out with wire brush and soft brush , don't breath in to much of the dust its nasty.
  • Fit new pads (remember pad wear sensor on inside pad), make sure that the pads are in contact with the disc , and the top of them sitting flush with the rim of the disc, don't force them into this position they should naturally sit there.
  • Lower caliper down into position, you may need to push back the piston further in order to make room for the new pads , do this with you hands or a small piece of timber. Keep an eye on the brake fluid reservoir , your pushing fluid back in so if its over full it may spill over. Refit lower caliper bolt (Renault say to replace this each time), and tighten. Reconnect pad wear sensor.
  • Pump brake pedal until normal brake pressure returns.
  • Remove axle stand/blocks, refit wheel and bolts, lower jack and tighten up wheel bolts.
Hope this helps...

Jan 17, 2011 | 1986 Renault Sport

2 Answers

What tools are required to replace front disks on a e36,328 sport


A set of metric wrenches or sockets will do the job

Nov 16, 2010 | BMW 328 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Change back Brake pads on renualt megane 2


1. Hand Brake ON , loosen wheel bolts to hand tight, jack up front wheel , chock back wheels , put axle stands/blocks in place (just in case) .

2. Remove wheel. Disconnect pad wear wire , it pulls out of the connector.

3. Remove lower caliper bolt (at the back of caliper at the bottom) , need a 13mm ring spanner for head of bolt and 17mm to stop it spinning

4. Use a screw driver between the back of the outer pad and the caliper to prise the caliper back away from the back of outer pad. Pivot caliper upwards to rest on top of wheel disc (good idea to tie it up with some wire) .

5. Remove and discard old pads , clean out with wire brush and soft brush , don't breath in to much of the dust its nasty.

6. Fit new pads (remember pad wear sensor on inside pad), make sure that the pads are in contact with the disc , and the top of them sitting flush with the rim of the disc, don't force them into this position they should naturally sit there.

7. Lower caliper down into position, you may need to push back the piston further in order to make room for the new pads , do this with you hands or a small piece of timber. Keep an eye on the brake fluid resivoir , your pushing fluid back in so if its over full it may spill over. Refit lower caliper bolt (Renault say to replace this each time), and tigthen. Reconect pad wear sensor.

8. Pump brake pedal until normal brake pressure returns.

9. Remove axle stand/blocks , refit wheel and bolts , lower jack and tighten up wheel bolts.

Sep 18, 2009 | 2006 Renault Le Car

1 Answer

Remove and replace front disc brakes and rotors on 2003 landrover freelander


This is how I did it, 2003 TD4 Kalahari automatic, vented discs (earlier models have different size discs and calipers), without reference to any manual, so follow at your own risk if you feel confident and have the correct tools. It is a caliper off job, so common sense and strong wrist (to undo and retighten bolts is important). Check disc wear at the same time, to reduce the hassle of having to do it all again if the discs are shot.

Prepare a piece of stout cord. Slacken wheel nuts, jack car up and support on axle stands, remove wheel and site under front sill as precaution against axle stand/jack collapse and to clear out of area of operation, use 15mm socket to remove the two caliper fixing bolts on inside of hub. Ease caliper away from hub and tie up with cord (to reduce stress on brake hose. Remove clips from through pins and remove anti-squeal shim. Use pry bar between pads to open caliper fully (not recommended if you are going to re-fit same pads), remembering to seal reservoir to prevent fluid leakage. Try fitting new pads to caliper (I had to grind one pads metal lugs slightly to allow fitting to stainless sliders - another had already been machined by the manufacturer). Fit shims as per instructions with new pads. Re-fit anti-squeal shim & through pins and pin clips. Re-assemble in reverse sequence to dis-assembly. Car passed MOT ok, with good braking performance. NB it is important to check disc thickness. which my MOT station said is a minimum of 18mm, mine were at 19+mm after 40k.

The CD service manual is available on ebay for less than £5.00, so it might be worth checking that first, as I make no assertion that my way was the correct method, just that it worked.

Hope that helps.

Apr 18, 2009 | 2003 Land Rover Freelander

1 Answer

Rear Brake Pads, Discs/Hub


make sure there genuine bmw parts i have come across this before with spurious parts in other cars
were you new discs same width as the old ones

Jun 29, 2008 | 1999 BMW 318 ti

1 Answer

Replace brake pads on chev. colorado pick-up


90% of the time the sequence is identical.

Slacken wheelnuts.
Jack up and support on axle stand.
Remove roadwheel.

There should be two bolts holding the brake caliper on - usually on the inside.
Slacken both, but only remove the lower one.
The caliper should then be able to swing up pivoting on the top bolt.
You can remove this top bolt, but support the weight of the assembly with wire to the suspension spring - so as not to stress the brake hose.
Remove the brake pads, and clean the areas the pads seat on.

Push back the pistons. Some require a special tool, most make do with a wooden packer and suitable large lever - or G clamp.

Fit new pads. Pay particular attention to any fitting clips, springs, rods or pins that are needed.

With new pads in, swing down caliper into position. Fit new attatchment bolts or use a threadlock on fixings. & tighten.

Still with wheel off, depress brake pedal to activate brakes - & check for leaks and working.
With foot off brake, check hub turns with no problems.
Refit wheel and repeat for other side.

ALWAYS replace brakes in axle pairs.

Hope this helps.

Jun 14, 2008 | 2006 Chevrolet Colorado

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