Question about 1984 Toyota Starlet

1 Answer

Whats the proper name of the cam belt cog

Hi i,v e got a problem with my starlet, the cog on the cam belt bottom right corner on the front has worn out for some unknown reason and the the centre of it is trashed where there use to be a keyed hole there is now just a hole what is the name of this cog so i can tell the parts guy exactly what i am looking to get, from tristan isolated in the middle of nz.reefton township miles away from anywhere.

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 500 times.

  • Toyota Master
  • 1,779 Answers

To Tristan, I believe you are referring to the sprocket. Good Luck, from Curt, not isolated enough, in Connecticut, USA. countrycurt0

Posted on Aug 20, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

How to replace a cam belt


Line up marks on the front pulley.T.DC remove cover over the belt check marks on the cam cog lines up with a pointer,s then release adjuster pulley slide old belt off and new one on ! D,on,t allow any cogs to move.retention cam belt.

Mar 31, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Cam gear installation


very old post
96s in usa (not canada) are all G16b , 16v engines
so
here it full page, and full fsm page linkes, all free.
all 16v have cam cog false marks 2 false
key false and TDC false.
the "I" marks are dead wrong, and few books warn of this fact


http://www.fixkick.com/t-belt/16-fast-belt-install.html

all ways to do it right and correct the wrong(all ways)

Feb 18, 2014 | 1996 Geo Tracker 2 Door

1 Answer

How to replace front cam shaft seal in Geo Tracker,1.6 liter engine


remove tbelt (lots of steps see link)
remove front cog on cable( 8v head is diffr that 16v to lock it)
tell if 8v or 16v engine
then remove backing plate.
then the seal clamp.
the seals falls off.
reverse above
http://www.fixkick.com/t-belt/tbelt-index.html

there are links to the real FSM pages to, this page covers
every type of cam cog /belt failure there is.

or at head pulls seen here with skips
http://www.fixkick.com/engine/head-pull/head-pull.html
or hear start at step 8 to 12
then do step 14
then jump to 32. and stop
the cam cog bolt is RHT that is CCW takes it off
then remove the backpan , 10mmbolts and last the
seal clamp.

in short, all belts off, fan blade off.
timing cover (tbelt) off
timing belt idler stud and idler center bolt loose.
timing belt off
top cog bolt off (use locking method) ask)
backpan off
seal clamp off.

see how to time a cam , in link 1 above.

Jan 07, 2013 | 1994 Geo Tracker

1 Answer

Oil leak front engine timing chan


1995 Tracker would have a timing BELT. Normal oil leak points (in order) on a Suzuki G16 engine are the distributor base (rear of motor), valve cover (top of motor), front main seal (behind lower timing belt cog) cam seal (behind the upper timing belt cog) and rear main seal. (behind the flywheel). I'd suspect the front main seal or cam seal. I use foot power to help find oil leaks.

Dec 24, 2012 | 1995 Geo Tracker

1 Answer

How to change a timing belt


In 98 to 2002 Kia Sportage models ( all equipped with the DOHC 16V 2.0 liter 4 cylinder motor ) these are the instructions for the timing belt replacement.
1. Take all frontal pieces off, inculding fan, fan pully bracket, all belts ( A/C, power steering, and alternator ), thermostat housing and and hoses, fan shroud, then crank pully ( 6 - 10MM bolts around a large 21MM center bolt, dont worry about the center bolt, the pully will come off after removing the 6 outer bolts ) then the belt covers, both top and bottom.
2. Once you have access to the belt and with the crank pully removed you will see a small woodruff key on the nub shaft that protrudes from the crank cog. Align that to a 12 o' clock position. This key is what fits in the notch on the crank pully, ignore the small square marking on one of the cog teeth, it is useless.
3. After aligning the woodruff key to the 12 o' clock position make sure your intake came ( left side cam ) is aligned properly, you will know this when you see the "I" on the cog in the twelve o' clock position and aligned with a small marking or "dent" that sits immediately above the cog on the belt backing plate. If it is not aligned there turn the crank another 180 degrees and it should be.
4. Check your exhaust cam the same way as step 3.
5. Now with everything aligned loosen the tensioner nut and pry it to the left with a small crowbar or long screw driver or something elongated. When the tensioner pully is pushed as far as it will go to the left, tighten the nut. This will make it much easier to get the belt off and on.
5. Take the belt off, you may have to work it off with a screw driver or it may simply come off by hand if it is worn well enough. Dont be alarmed if your cams move or snap out of position, it is not a big deal as long as you make sure the crank cog stays put and the engine isnt turned over.
6. Now comes the slightly tougher part, if you got lucky your cams will not have moved, if not then you will have to fiddle around with their alignment and have someone hold them aligned with two 17MM wrenches or something while you reinstall the belt.
7. After installing the belt make sure your alignment marks are set, the "I" on the intake ( left cam ) at 12 o' clock and facing the small dent on the timing cover backing plate and the "E" on the exhaust ( right cam ) aligned the same way as well and your crank cog marking ( woodruff key ) aligned to 12 o' clock and facing the small notch on the front of the block immediately behind the crank cog. There is also, most times, a small plate on the back of the crank cog that has a beveled notch in it and should be aligned with the woodruff pin, the two parts ( cog and plate ) are one part and move together so if you align the woodruff key at 12 o' clock, the notch should be aligned as well. Now might be a good time to disconnect your battery to allow the cam sensor to reset, it may not be necessary but its better safe than sorry.
8. With all the cogs aligned loosen the tensioner bolt and let it slide back to put tension on the new belt, you may wish to place a small pry bar behind the tensioner to move it to the right a bit and make sure it has tightened the belt securely. Once the tensioner has been moved and the belt securely tight, tighten the bolt once again to hold the tensioner.
9. Turn the engine over a few times using a ratchet and 21 MM socket on the end of the crank cog, making sure to stop the crank after every second revolution and when the woodruff key is aligned at the twelve o' clock position. Then check your markings, making sure they are still aligned, if not, refer back to step 6.
10. After you have made absolutely sure everything is aligned properly, turn the crank until the "E" on the exhaust cam ( right cam ) is aligned at the 12 o' clock position and aligned with the small dent on the belt backing plate. Then turn the engine clockwise until the "S" on the exhaust cog is facing that same dent on the backing plate.
11. Now you may plug all of your water passages and hoses, reconnect your battery, and though it is not advised but sometimes necessary, start the engine. Do not let it run long however, just long enough to make sure everything is running smoothly. If all is well, shut the engine down and make sure the belt is on the pulleys securely and that everything is still aligned as said in step 9, if not, refer back to step 6.
12. Now that everything is running well you may reverse the procedure and put everything back together. After reinstalling everything and starting the engine you may notice a tapping under the valve cover, do not be alarmed however, that is just lifter bleed down from the cams being turned over with no oil pressure. Simply drive the vehicle a few miles and it will eventually go away.
I hope this relieves the pressure on some of you that are trying to find the right way to do this, I have done it this way and I know it works, plus i have the schematics. If you have any questions feel free to post on this topic and ask away, I should be able to answer everything you need.

would not perform step 11 and if everything is properly aligned it is not necessary anyway. Simply perform step 9 with manual rotation of the engine. This is all the shop manual recommends.

Oct 01, 2010 | 2002 Kia Sportage

1 Answer

2002 hyundai accent DL sedan. my tension pulley


hi from uk to retime cambelt is as follows = the crank cog has a mark which lines up with corresponding mark on front of engine block mark is approx 12-30 o/clock this is TDC No 1 the the cam cog has a small drilled hole in one of the webs just below the cog teeth ? this hole has to be at 12-o/clock position and then using a small mirror if you look through this hole you will see a vertical notch on the front of block this is theTDC mark for cam you then fit belt anticlockwise from c/shaft to cam then round tensioner then release tensionor to tension belt and then lock it up torque both bolts 20 - 27Nm rotate engine manually 4 complete turns clockwise then recheck marks ok /re align ? then re assemble crank pully bolt torque is 140 -150 Nm may i just inform you? that your engine is what is known as interferance that is to say in event of c/belt failure there is more than likely valves to piston contact however this can also occure too if miss timed belt fitted and engine has tried to start ? a compression test on cylinders will confirm if this has happened or not ? hope this helps

Mar 16, 2010 | 2001 Hyundai Accent

1 Answer

Correct way to align timing marks


hi -- the timing marks on a twin cam are tricky!! heres how- turn the motor over to tdc on the bottom pulley,this will align two marks on the lower cog-----now on the top cog,it has an obvious mark near the teeth-- well disregard this for now!! the cog has a hole in it,in one of the spokes,well this goes at 12 o,clock and lines up with a mark you will see on the housing! now if you are right you will see the mark near the teeth is at around 4,oclock---i just did one and it is right--cheers

May 11, 2009 | 1994 Hyundai Excel

1 Answer

Timing belt posision


1. Take all frontal pieces off, inculding fan, fan pully bracket, all belts ( A/C, power steering, and alternator ), thermostat housing and and hoses, fan shroud, then crank pully ( 6 - 10MM bolts around a large 21MM center bolt, dont worry about the center bolt, the pully will come off after removing the 6 outer bolts ) then the belt covers, both top and bottom. 2. Once you have access to the belt and with the crank pully removed you will see a small woodruff key on the nub shaft that protrudes from the crank cog. Align that to a 12 o' clock position. This key is what fits in the notch on the crank pully, ignore the small square marking on one of the cog teeth, it is useless. 3. After aligning the woodruff key to the 12 o' clock position make sure your intake came ( left side cam ) is aligned properly, you will know this when you see the "I" on the cog in the twelve o' clock position and aligned with a small marking or "dent" that sits immediately above the cog on the belt backing plate. If it is not aligned there turn the crank another 180 degrees and it should be. 4. Check your exhaust cam the same way as step 3. 5. Now with everything aligned loosen the tensioner nut and pry it to the left with a small crowbar or long screw driver or something elongated. When the tensioner pully is pushed as far as it will go to the left, tighten the nut. This will make it much easier to get the belt off and on. 5. Take the belt off, you may have to work it off with a screw driver or it may simply come off by hand if it is worn well enough. Dont be alarmed if your cams move or snap out of position, it is not a big deal as long as you make sure the crank cog stays put and the engine isnt turned over. 6. Now comes the slightly tougher part, if you got lucky your cams will not have moved, if not then you will have to fiddle around with their alignment and have someone hold them aligned with two 17MM wrenches or something while you reinstall the belt. 7. After installing the belt make sure your alignment marks are set, the "I" on the intake ( left cam ) at 12 o' clock and facing the small dent on the timing cover backing plate and the "E" on the exhaust ( right cam ) aligned the same way as well and your crank cog marking ( woodruff key ) aligned to 12 o' clock and facing the small notch on the front of the block immediately behind the crank cog. There is also, most times, a small plate on the back of the crank cog that has a beveled notch in it and should be aligned with the woodruff pin, the two parts ( cog and plate ) are one part and move together so if you align the woodruff key at 12 o' clock, the notch should be aligned as well. Now might be a good time to disconnect your battery to allow the cam sensor to reset, it may not be necessary but its better safe than sorry. 8. With all the cogs aligned loosen the tensioner bolt and let it slide back to put tension on the new belt, you may wish to place a small pry bar behind the tensioner to move it to the right a bit and make sure it has tightened the belt securely. Once the tensioner has been moved and the belt securely tight, tighten the bolt once again to hold the tensioner. 9. Turn the engine over a few times using a ratchet and 21 MM socket on the end of the crank cog, making sure to stop the crank after every second revolution and when the woodruff key is aligned at the twelve o' clock position. Then check your markings, making sure they are still aligned, if not, refer back to step 6. 10. After you have made absolutely sure everything is aligned properly, turn the crank until the "E" on the exhaust cam ( right cam ) is aligned at the 12 o' clock position and aligned with the small dent on the belt backing plate. Then turn the engine clockwise until the "S" on the exhaust cog is facing that same dent on the backing plate. 11. Now you may plug all of your water passages and hoses, reconnect your battery, and though it is not advised but sometimes necessary, start the engine. Do not let it run long however, just long enough to make sure everything is running smoothly. If all is well, shut the engine down and make sure the belt is on the pulleys securely and that everything is still aligned as said in step 9, if not, refer back to step 6. 12. Now that everything is running well you may reverse the procedure and put everything back together. After reinstalling everything and starting the engine you may notice a tapping under the valve cover, do not be alarmed however, that is just lifter bleed down from the cams being turned over with no oil pressure. Simply drive the vehicle a few miles and it will eventually go away. I hope this relieves the pressure on some of you that are trying to find the right way to do this, I have done it this way and I know it works, plus i have the schematics. If you have any questions feel free to post on this topic and ask away, I should be able to answer everything you need. would not perform step 11 and if everything is properly aligned it is not necessary anyway. Simply perform step 9 with manual rotation of the engine. This is all the shop manual recommends

Dec 02, 2008 | 2002 Kia Sportage

2 Answers

Belts


Timing belt has marks on it that refer to the cam marks and the crank gear. Looking at the engine from the front, the timing belt should drape over the two cam gears, with 40 cogs between them on the belt. The timing belt should have 42 or 43? cogs between the driver cam mark and the mark on the crank gear. The way i've installed mine is to put the belt on the driver side cam and crank, and then put it on the passenger side cam. You'll need to lock the tensioner clockwise about 70-80 degrees to get enough clearance to install the belt.

Aug 15, 2008 | 1995 Nissan Pathfinder

1 Answer

Jumped timing?


It really does sound like the timing went out of whack. The timing belt should be replaced periodically, according to your owner's manual. It may have worn and stretched just enough to slip over a cog a bit. Remove the timing belt covers and check the alignment of your cam and crank. There should be subtle marks on the cogs and the rear cover or casting. The compression will be good during a cranking test, but will not be ok during a running compression check. Replace the timing belt and check the pulleys. If your timing belt did not slip, the timing chain tensioner or guide shoes may be worn and will require replacement.

Aug 07, 2008 | 1991 Pontiac Grand Am

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cars & Trucks Logo

Related Topics:

52 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Toyota Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

60769 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

21949 Answers

Jeff Turcotte
Jeff Turcotte

Level 3 Expert

6811 Answers

Are you a Toyota Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...