Question about 1997 GMC Sierra

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I was going 65mph on the freeway when my 5 speed 1997 GMC truck lost power and I coasted to an exit ramp. I tried starting it several times after that but it kept dying. I put my flashers on and they only worked while I engaged the ignition. I have been unable to successfully start the vehicle since.

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FUEL PUMP? THEY GO OUT ALOT ON THESE. ALSO TRY CHECKING YOUR RELAY SWITCHES.

Posted on Jun 08, 2011

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I ask a question on what is the drive cycle to reset obd for toyota2005 rav4


Step One: How to Prepare Your Vehicle
  • Have the fuel tank between 30 and 70 percent full. Some systems, especially the EVAP system, need to have a specific level of fuel in order for the tests to be trusted. If the fuel tank is near empty or completely full, many of the basic tests will not run at all.
  • The vehicle must also have a good alternator and a strong battery. If you have to occasionally jump-start your vehicle, all of the memory from the powertrain control module (PCM) is erased, which includes the data that accurately tracks the results from various stages of the Drive Cycle. Also, if the battery is weak or undercharged, some of the most important tests will never run.
  • The vehicle must sit overnight, or for at least eight hours, in an environment that is less than 90° F. The engine temperature needs to match the air temperature in order to establish an accurate baseline for the testing. If the outside temperature is over 90° F, the fuel is too volatile and the EVAP system won't even try to run its tests, though some of the other emissions systems may run their tests.
  • The keys must be out of the ignition and all of the doors must be closed while the vehicle sits over night because many of the onboard computers "boot up" when the keys are in the ignition. Also, many of the onboard computers still run until all of the doors are closed after the vehicle is shut off and the keys are removed.
Step Two: The Cold Start
  • Start the vehicle and let it idle for two to three minutes in Park or Neutral. While it is idling, turn on the head lights, heater/defroster, and rear defroster for a three to five minute warm-up phase. Let the idle speed settle down to near the normal speed.
  • Next, put the vehicle in gear and drive through city streets at about 25 mph. Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times before slowing down to stop. Don't roll through the stop; be sure the car is really stopped, just like you learned in driving school. Accelerate from each stop in a normal fashion-not overly conservative, but not like you are competing in a drag race either.
Step Three: A Short Freeway Trip
  • After the vehicle has been cold started and driven for a few miles on city streets, the next step is to take it on a short freeway trip.
  • Enter the freeway on-ramp and allow enough room with respect to other vehicles so that you can do a 1/2 to 3/4 throttle acceleration up to freeway speed.
  • When you have accelerated up to around 60 mph and have safely merged into the flow of traffic, stay in the slow lane and maintain a steady speed of 55 to 60 mph for a minimum of five miles. Please use the cruise control to help you maintain speed.
  • Find a nice, long off ramp to exit from the freeway. As you exit, take your foot off of the accelerator and let the vehicle coast down until it stops under its own power as you complete your exit from the freeway. Do not use the foot brake and do not shift gears until the very end of this "coast down" phase.
  • Step Four: More City Driving
    • After you have completed the freeway trip, drive through the city streets for a repeat of the second part of Step Two.
    • Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times and then maintain a city speed of 25 mph before slowing down to stop. Again, don't roll through the stop and make sure to accelerate normally.
    • Pull in to a parking place and let the engine idle for one to two minutes and then shut it off.
    Step Five: Have your Readiness Monitors Checked and Verified
    • Drive your vehicle to your regular shop and have them re-check your readiness monitors, present codes, and pending codes. They should do this as a courtesy and for free.
    • If all of your monitors are "ready" and there are no present or pending codes, then your vehicle has been properly repaired and is ready for an emissions inspection and for normal driving.

Feb 21, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to do the drive cycle of a 1996 Nissan pathfinder


How to Perform a Basic Drive Cycle


Step One: How to Prepare Your Vehicle

  • Have the fuel tank between 30 and 70 percent full. Some systems, especially the EVAP system, need to have a specific level of fuel in order for the tests to be trusted. If the fuel tank is near empty or completely full, many of the basic tests will not run at all.
  • The vehicle must also have a good alternator and a strong battery. If you have to occasionally jump-start your vehicle, all of the memory from the powertrain control module (PCM) is erased, which includes the data that accurately tracks the results from various stages of the Drive Cycle. Also, if the battery is weak or undercharged, some of the most important tests will never run.
  • The vehicle must sit overnight, or for at least eight hours, in an environment that is less than 90° F. The engine temperature needs to match the air temperature in order to establish an accurate baseline for the testing. If the outside temperature is over 90° F, the fuel is too volatile and the EVAP system won't even try to run its tests, though some of the other emissions systems may run their tests.
  • The keys must be out of the ignition and all of the doors must be closed while the vehicle sits over night because many of the onboard computers "boot up" when the keys are in the ignition. Also, many of the onboard computers still run until all of the doors are closed after the vehicle is shut off and the keys are removed.
Step Two: The Cold Start
  • Start the vehicle and let it idle for two to three minutes in Park or Neutral. While it is idling, turn on the head lights, heater/defroster, and rear defroster for a three to five minute warm-up phase. Let the idle speed settle down to near the normal speed.
  • Next, put the vehicle in gear and drive through city streets at about 25 mph. Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times before slowing down to stop. Don't roll through the stop; be sure the car is really stopped, just like you learned in driving school. Accelerate from each stop in a normal fashion-not overly conservative, but not like you are competing in a drag race either.
Step Three: A Short Freeway Trip
  • After the vehicle has been cold started and driven for a few miles on city streets, the next step is to take it on a short freeway trip.
  • Enter the freeway on-ramp and allow enough room with respect to other vehicles so that you can do a 1/2 to 3/4 throttle acceleration up to freeway speed.
  • When you have accelerated up to around 60 mph and have safely merged into the flow of traffic, stay in the slow lane and maintain a steady speed of 55 to 60 mph for a minimum of five miles. Please use the cruise control to help you maintain speed.
  • Find a nice, long off ramp to exit from the freeway. As you exit, take your foot off of the accelerator and let the vehicle coast down until it stops under its own power as you complete your exit from the freeway. Do not use the foot brake and do not shift gears until the very end of this "coast down" phase.
Step Four: More City Driving
  • After you have completed the freeway trip, drive through the city streets for a repeat of the second part of Step Two.
  • Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times and then maintain a city speed of 25 mph before slowing down to stop. Again, don't roll through the stop and make sure to accelerate normally.
  • Pull in to a parking place and let the engine idle for one to two minutes and then shut it off.
Step Five: Wave your Readiness Monitors Checked and Verified
  • Drive your vehicle to your regular shop and have them re-check your readiness monitors, present codes, and pending codes. They should do this as a courtesy and for free.
  • If all of your monitors are "ready" and there are no present or pending codes, then your vehicle has been properly repaired and is ready for an emissions inspection and for normal driving.
  • If your monitors are not ready, please click here for more information.

May 26, 2016 | Nissan Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to do the drive cycle on a 1996 nissan pathfinder


How to Perform a Basic Drive Cycle


Step One: How to Prepare Your Vehicle

  • Have the fuel tank between 30 and 70 percent full. Some systems, especially the EVAP system, need to have a specific level of fuel in order for the tests to be trusted. If the fuel tank is near empty or completely full, many of the basic tests will not run at all.
  • The vehicle must also have a good alternator and a strong battery. If you have to occasionally jump-start your vehicle, all of the memory from the powertrain control module (PCM) is erased, which includes the data that accurately tracks the results from various stages of the Drive Cycle. Also, if the battery is weak or undercharged, some of the most important tests will never run.
  • The vehicle must sit overnight, or for at least eight hours, in an environment that is less than 90° F. The engine temperature needs to match the air temperature in order to establish an accurate baseline for the testing. If the outside temperature is over 90° F, the fuel is too volatile and the EVAP system won't even try to run its tests, though some of the other emissions systems may run their tests.
  • The keys must be out of the ignition and all of the doors must be closed while the vehicle sits over night because many of the onboard computers "boot up" when the keys are in the ignition. Also, many of the onboard computers still run until all of the doors are closed after the vehicle is shut off and the keys are removed.
Step Two: The Cold Start
  • Start the vehicle and let it idle for two to three minutes in Park or Neutral. While it is idling, turn on the head lights, heater/defroster, and rear defroster for a three to five minute warm-up phase. Let the idle speed settle down to near the normal speed.
  • Next, put the vehicle in gear and drive through city streets at about 25 mph. Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times before slowing down to stop. Don't roll through the stop; be sure the car is really stopped, just like you learned in driving school. Accelerate from each stop in a normal fashion-not overly conservative, but not like you are competing in a drag race either.
Step Three: A Short Freeway Trip
  • After the vehicle has been cold started and driven for a few miles on city streets, the next step is to take it on a short freeway trip.
  • Enter the freeway on-ramp and allow enough room with respect to other vehicles so that you can do a 1/2 to 3/4 throttle acceleration up to freeway speed.
  • When you have accelerated up to around 60 mph and have safely merged into the flow of traffic, stay in the slow lane and maintain a steady speed of 55 to 60 mph for a minimum of five miles. Please use the cruise control to help you maintain speed.
  • Find a nice, long off ramp to exit from the freeway. As you exit, take your foot off of the accelerator and let the vehicle coast down until it stops under its own power as you complete your exit from the freeway. Do not use the foot brake and do not shift gears until the very end of this "coast down" phase.
Step Four: More City Driving
  • After you have completed the freeway trip, drive through the city streets for a repeat of the second part of Step Two.
  • Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times and then maintain a city speed of 25 mph before slowing down to stop. Again, don't roll through the stop and make sure to accelerate normally.
  • Pull in to a parking place and let the engine idle for one to two minutes and then shut it off.
Step Five: Wave your Readiness Monitors Checked and Verified
  • Drive your vehicle to your regular shop and have them re-check your readiness monitors, present codes, and pending codes. They should do this as a courtesy and for free.
  • If all of your monitors are "ready" and there are no present or pending codes, then your vehicle has been properly repaired and is ready for an emissions inspection and for normal driving.
  • If your monitors are not ready, please click here for more information.

May 26, 2016 | Nissan Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Transmission doesn't downshift when accelerating on freeway


the most likely problem is the sending unit the throttle pedal is connected to. But check that all the linkage (if there is any) on the tranni is functioning

Mar 12, 2014 | 1999 Kia Sportage

1 Answer

Why is mybcm not letting me pass insp there is no code on thi1996 chry lhs what is going on


You mean PCM most states read the readiness monitors depending on the state on how many they allow not to be completed. The first one on the list that is hard to get run and pass is the EVAP Because this requires the car to be cold and fuel tank must between 15%-85% and both air temp and coolant temp with in 10 degrees of each other. Start car let idle for 5 -10 minutes Then drive car normally no hard accelerations or quick stops bring speed to 50-60 mph and coast down to 20-15 mph without brake pedal input repeat this twice.Then bring speed to 58-62 mph and set cruise control run for 12-16 miles exit freeway caught a red light or stop and idle 2 minutes shut car off rest for 5 minutes and repeat freeway drive. then redo morning cold start again . then have some one test the generic readiness monitors to what needs to run and attempt again. California before 2000 1 can be incomplete after 2000 all have to be completed which is hard some will not run for 800 miles.

Nov 08, 2013 | 2001 Ford Escape

1 Answer

Need description of obd drive cycle


This is my drive cycle a generic drive cycle i have used many times over the years and it has never failed me most drive cycles are too specific and impossible to adhere to for most drivers follow these steps exactly 1. make sure all codes are cleared and no check engine light is on 2 make sure the fuel level is between 1/4 and 3/4 full (this is part of the enable criteria for the evap monitor to run ) 3 let vehicle set overnight 4 start engine and let idle until the temp gauge is in the middle (this cold start enables the evap monitor and runs the O2 sensor heater test )5 drive vehicle around town avoid the highway stay at below 50 mph and when stoping at lights remove your foot from the gas and coast from around 50 to about 10mph or less if possible this will run the EGR monitor after about 3 to five miles of this proceed to the highway or freeway and travel over 50 but under 70 mph for about 3 to 5 miles this will run the catalyst test provided the O2 monitors passed if they didnt you will have a check engine light on before this point also i do a coast down on exit ramps (no braking) they make great places to get that EGR to run ONCE YOU START THIS PROCEDURE DO NOT KILL THE ENGINE OR SOME OF THE TEST WILL FAIL TO RUN

Jan 04, 2013 | 1999 Lexus ES 300

1 Answer

1987 Subaru GL 1.8 liter automatic, 2WD. Fuel-injected. Quit running at 65MPH on freeway, coasted into parking lot. Parked. Cannot start. Noticed crank case was accidently overfilled on dip stick approx...


first check the timing belt because it may be broke.Another solution could be a clogged catalytic converter.It really sounds like a timing belt.Remove inspection cover for the timing belt and have someone turn over the motor and see if your camshaft is turning.

Oct 15, 2010 | 1987 Subaru Gl 4WD

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