Question about 1998 Mercury Villager

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My ignition coil isn't getting any fire to it.

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It may be the ECM if so you wont be getting fuel either turn the switch on and see if you can hear the fuelpump running.

Posted on May 29, 2011

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My 4 cyl mustang is working with only one cylinder spark plugs, cables and ignition coils are new what is it?


When you have Coil Packs not firing Spark... it's usually due to one of two reasons: 1.) the Coil Pack is BAD 2.) the Ignition Control Module (ICM) has fried internally and is not activating that specific Ignition Coil within the Coil Pack ...The most common is the ICM ...The probable reason your catalytic conv. gets red hot is due to raw gas being dumped through the exhaust from the no fire on your cyl... Running it like that can cause severe damage to your conv...

Sep 30, 2012 | 1993 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

1994 mustang v6 started running real rough and is now almost dieing when I press the gas I have cleaned.


Many times the plugs and wires are cancelled out with the coil pak.
change all of them, you will be glad you did.
The ignition coil pack is a crucial part of your ignition system. It's function is to convert the 12 volt power of your vehicle's electrical system in to 35,000 or more volts. This produces a high intensity spark at the spark plug which then ignites the fuel in the cylinder. Coils in general will wear out over time and cause a misfire condition. In engines like this that use a coil pack, if one coil goes bad, the complete assembly needs to be replaced. PLEZE LET ME KNOW. there isn't anything else.


  • HOLLANDER #: 610-00133
  • OE #: 919F-12029-AA

Sep 17, 2012 | 1994 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

Miss fireing


Hi there:

P0351 Ignition Coil A Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction
and
P0352 Ignition Coil B Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction

and
P0354 Ignition Coil D Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction


Work for all coil codes. The COP (coil on plug) ignition system is what is used on most modern engines. There is an individual coil for each cylinder that is controlled by the PCM (powertrain control module). It eliminates the need for spark plug wires by putting the coil right above the sparkplug. Two wires are dedicated to each coil. One is a battery feed usually from the power distribution center. The other wire is the coil driver circuit from the PCM. The PCM grounds/ungrounds this circuit to activate or deactivate the coil. The coil driver circuit is monitored by the PCM for faults



If an open or a short is detected in the driver circuit for coil number 1, a P0351 may set. Also, depending on the vehicle, the PCM may also shut down the fuel injector to the cylinder also.


Symptoms of a P0351 P0352 and P0354 DTC may include:
MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination
Engine misfire may be present or intermittent

Potential causes of a P0351 , P0352 and P0354 code include:
Short to voltage or ground on COP driver circuit
Open on COP driver circuit
Loose connection at coil or broken connector locks
Bad Coil (COP)
Faulty Powertrain Control Module


Possible Solutions:
Is the engine misfiring presently? If not, the problem is likely intermittent. Try wiggle testing the wiring at the #1 coil and along the wiring harness to the PCM. If manipulating the wiring causes the misfire to surface, repair the wiring problem. Check for poor connection at the coil connector. Verify the harness isn't misrouted or chafing on anything. Repair as necessary


If the engine is misfiring presently, stop the engine and disconnect the #1 coil wiring connector. Then start the engine and check for a driver signal to the #1 coil or #2. Using a scope will give you a visual pattern to observe, but since most people don't have access to one there's an easier way. Use a Voltmeter in AC Hertz scale and see if there's a Hz reading of between 5 and 20 or so that indicates the driver is working. If there is a Hertz signal, then replace the #1 ignition coil. It's likely bad. If you don't detect any frequency signal from the PCM on the ignition coil driver circuit indicating the PCM is grounding/ungrounding the circuit (or there is no visible pattern on the scope if you have one) then leave the coil disconnected and check for DC voltage on the driver circuit at the ignition coil connector. If there is any significant voltage on that wire then there is a short to voltage somewhere. Find the short and repair it.


If there is no voltage on the driver circuit, then turn the ignition off. Disconnect the PCM connector and check the continuity of the driver between the PCM and the coil. If there is no continuity repair the open or short to ground in the circuit. If continuity is present, then check for resistance between ground and the ignition coil connector. There should be infinite resistance. If there isn't, repair the short to ground in the coil driver circuit


NOTE: If the ignition coil driver signal wire is not open or shorted to voltage or ground and there is no trigger signal to the coil then suspect a faulty PCM coil driver. Also keep in mind that if the PCM driver is at fault, there may be a wiring problem that caused the PCM failure. It's a good idea to do the above check after PCM replacement to verify there won't be a repeat failure. If you find that the engine isn't misfiring, the coil is being triggered properly but P0351 is continually being reset, there is the possibility that the PCM coil monitoring system may be faulty.


Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Aug 07, 2012 | 2004 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

Code 0300 ,0303,0351,and2302


Hi there:
DTC P0300 - RandomMultiple Cylinder Misfire Detected
Basically this means that the the car's computer has detected that not all of the engine's cylinders are firing properly.

A P0300 diagnostic code indicates a random or multiple misfire. If the last digit is a number other than zero, it corresponds to the cylinder number that is misfiring. A P0302 code, for example, would tell you cylinder number two is misfiring. Unfortunately, a P0300 doesn't tell you specifically which cylinder(s) is/are mis-firing, nor why.

Symptoms may include:
the engine may be harder to start
the engine may stumble / stumble, and/or hesitate
other symptoms may also be present


A code P0300 may mean that one or more of the following has happened:
Faulty spark plugs or wires
Faulty coil (pack)
Faulty oxygen sensor(s)
Faulty fuel injector(s)
Burned exhaust valve
Faulty catalytic converter(s)
Stuck/blocked EGR valve / passages
Faulty camshaft position sensor
Defective computer

Possible Solutions:
If there are no symptoms, the simplest thing to do is to reset the code and see if it comes back.

If there are symptoms such as the engine is stumbling or hesitating, check all wiring and connectors that lead to the cylinders (i.e. spark plugs). Depending on how long the ignition components have been in the car, it may be a good idea to replace them as part of your regular maintenance schedule. I would suggest spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor cap, and rotor (if applicable). Otherwise, check the coils (a.k.a. coil packs). In some cases, the catalytic converter has gone bad. If you smell rotten eggs in the exhaust, your cat converter needs to be replaced. I've also heard in other cases the problems were faulty fuel injectors.

Random misfires that jump around from one cylinder to another (read: P030x codes) also will set a P0300 code. The underlying cause is often a lean fuel condition, which may be due to a vacuum leak in the intake manifold or unmetered air getting past the airflow sensor, or an EGR valve that is stuck open.


DTC P0351 - Ignition Coil A Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction
The COP (coil on plug) ignition system is what is used on most modern engines. There is an individual coil for each cylinder that is controlled by the PCM (powertrain control module). It eliminates the need for spark plug wires by putting the coil right above the sparkplug. Two wires are dedicated to each coil. One is a battery feed usually from the power distribution center. The other wire is the coil driver circuit from the PCM. The PCM grounds/ungrounds this circuit to activate or deactivate the coil. The coil driver circuit is monitored by the PCM for faults

If an open or a short is detected in the driver circuit for coil number 1, a P0351 may set. Also, depending on the vehicle, the PCM may also shut down the fuel injector to the cylinder also.


Symptoms of a P0351 DTC may include:
MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination
Engine misfire may be present or intermittent


Potential causes of a P0351 code include:
Short to voltage or ground on COP driver circuit
Open on COP driver circuit
Loose connection at coil or broken connector locks
Bad Coil (COP)
Faulty Powertrain Control Module

Possible Solutions:
Is the engine misfiring presently? If not, the problem is likely intermittent. Try wiggle testing the wiring at the #1 coil and along the wiring harness to the PCM. If manipulating the wiring causes the misfire to surface, repair the wiring problem. Check for poor connection at the coil connector. Verify the harness isn't misrouted or chafing on anything. Repair as necessary

If the engine is misfiring presently, stop the engine and disconnect the #1 coil wiring connector. Then start the engine and check for a driver signal to the #1 coil. Using a scope will give you a visual pattern to observe, but since most people don't have access to one there's an easier way. Use a Voltmeter in AC Hertz scale and see if there's a Hz reading of between 5 and 20 or so that indicates the driver is working. If there is a Hertz signal, then replace the #1 ignition coil. It's likely bad. If you don't detect any frequency signal from the PCM on the ignition coil driver circuit indicating the PCM is grounding/ungrounding the circuit (or there is no visible pattern on the scope if you have one) then leave the coil disconnected and check for DC voltage on the driver circuit at the ignition coil connector. If there is any significant voltage on that wire then there is a short to voltage somewhere. Find the short and repair it.

If there is no voltage on the driver circuit, then turn the ignition off. Disconnect the PCM connector and check the continuity of the driver between the PCM and the coil. If there is no continuity repair the open or short to ground in the circuit. If continuity is present, then check for resistance between ground and the ignition coil connector. There should be infinite resistance. If there isn't, repair the short to ground in the coil driver circuit

NOTE: If the ignition coil driver signal wire is not open or shorted to voltage or ground and there is no trigger signal to the coil then suspect a faulty PCM coil driver. Also keep in mind that if the PCM driver is at fault, there may be a wiring problem that caused the PCM failure. It's a good idea to do the above check after PCM replacement to verify there won't be a repeat failure. If you find that the engine isn't misfiring, the coil is being triggered properly but P0351 is continually being reset, there is the possibility that the PCM coil monitoring system may be faulty.


Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jun 29, 2012 | 2002 Dodge Neon

1 Answer

WHAT WOULD CAUSE THE SPARK PLUGS TO HAVE NO SPARK


It could be many things you need to check an see if your getting fire through the plug wire if plug wire isn't firing check the coil an rotor button an module

Apr 28, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2007 Ford V6 F150 error code p0353


Hi there:
DTC P0353 - Ignition Coil C Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction
The COP (coil on plug) ignition system is what is used on most modern engines. There is an individual coil for each cylinder that is controlled by the PCM (powertrain control module). It eliminates the need for spark plug wires by putting the coil right above the sparkplug. Two wires are dedicated to each coil. One is a battery feed usually from the power distribution center. The other wire is the coil driver circuit from the PCM. The PCM grounds/ungrounds this circuit to activate or deactivate the coil. The coil driver circuit is monitored by the PCM for faults

If an open or a short is detected in the driver circuit for coil number 3, a P0353 may set. Also, depending on the vehicle, the PCM may also shut down the fuel injector to the cylinder also.

Symptoms of a P0353 DTC may include:
MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination
Engine misfire may be present or intermittent

Potential causes of a P0353 code include:
Short to voltage or ground on COP driver circuit
Open on COP driver circuit
Loose connection at coil or broken connector locks
Bad Coil (COP)
Faulty Powertrain Control Module

Possible Solutions:
Is the engine misfiring presently? If not, the problem is likely intermittent. Try wiggle testing the wiring at the #3 coil and along the wiring harness to the PCM. If manipulating the wiring causes the misfire to surface, repair the wiring problem. Check for poor connection at the coil connector. Verify the harness isn't misrouted or chafing on anything. Repair as necessary

If the engine is misfiring presently, stop the engine and disconnect the #3 coil wiring connector. Then start the engine and check for a driver signal to the #3 coil. Using a scope will give you a visual pattern to observe, but since most people don't have access to one there's an easier way. Use a Voltmeter in AC Hertz scale and see if there's a Hz reading of between 5 and 20 or so that indicates the driver is working. If there is a Hertz signal, then replace the #3 ignition coil. It's likely bad. If you don't detect any frequency signal from the PCM on the ignition coil driver circuit indicating the PCM is grounding/ungrounding the circuit (or there is no visible pattern on the scope if you have one) then leave the coil disconnected and check for DC voltage on the driver circuit at the ignition coil connector. If there is any significant voltage on that wire then there is a short to voltage somewhere. Find the short and repair it.

If there is no voltage on the driver circuit, then turn the ignition off. Disconnect the PCM connector and check the continuity of the driver between the PCM and the coil. If there is no continuity repair the open or short to ground in the circuit. If continuity is present, then check for resistance between ground and the ignition coil connector. There should be infinite resistance. If there isn't, repair the short to ground in the coil driver circuit

NOTE: If the ignition coil driver signal wire is not open or shorted to voltage or ground and there is no trigger signal to the coil then suspect a faulty PCM coil driver. Also keep in mind that if the PCM driver is at fault, there may be a wiring problem that caused the PCM failure. It's a good idea to do the above check after PCM replacement to verify there won't be a repeat failure. If you find that the engine isn't misfiring, the coil is being triggered properly but P0353 is continually being reset, there is the possibility that the PCM coil monitoring system may be faulty.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jan 12, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

# 5 cylinder on my 2002 pontiac aztec is miss firing what could be possible causes


Hello! #1...Lets eliminate spark...2&5 are controlled by the same coil so it isn't the coil...Pull #5 spark plug and with wire attached lay the plug on ground and see if it fires blue...If not either wire is open or plug is bad...

#2...Fuel injector isn't spraying correctly...however, is the check engine light on?...If it is, go to an auto parts store for a free scan...If there is a trouble code it will help me solve the fault...Send a comment...guru..saailer

Jan 10, 2012 | 2003 Pontiac Aztek

1 Answer

The car motor wont start, the coil is not sending fire to the disterbutor,bypassed the coil to the batery and still no fire to the coil what's the problem?


Hello, Bridget! I am sorry that I couldn't help you sooner but I have been ill.

I got hit by lightening in my home that bruise me up and burnt my feet (this is the third time over 50 years now). Then I got that infamous cantaloupe but which isn't good for ones health.

The ignition system comprises of the van computer, ignition module, coil, distributor with two major component inside of the distributor--high voltage rotators cap, and the module pick-up coil, coil wire, plug wires, spark plugs. Also, all the sensor that are sending different types of signals to the computer, such as; air/fuel mixture, ambient temp, air flow, throttle position, engine temp, ATM pressure, humidity, altitude, barometric pressure, CO2 mixture, vacuum negative pressure, etc. GB...stewbison

Oct 15, 2011 | 1994 Plymouth Voyager

1 Answer

I changed the timing chains on a 98 Lincoln navigator and i have now P0355 ignition coil e primary/secondary circuit


P0355 Ignition Coil E Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction
The COP (coil on plug) ignition system is what is used on most modern engines. There is an individual coil for each cylinder that is controlled by the PCM (powertrain control module). It eliminates the need for spark plug wires by putting the coil right above the sparkplug. Two wires are dedicated to each coil. One is a battery feed usually from the power distribution center. The other wire is the coil driver circuit from the PCM. The PCM grounds/ungrounds this circuit to activate or deactivate the coil. The coil driver circuit is monitored by the PCM for faults

If an open or a short is detected in the driver circuit for coil #5, a P0355 may set. Also, depending on the vehicle, the PCM may also shut down the fuel injector to the cylinder also.

Symptoms of a P0355 DTC may include:
MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination
Engine misfire may be present or intermittent

Potential causes of a P0355 code include:
Short to voltage or ground on COP driver circuit
Open on COP driver circuit
Loose connection at coil or broken connector locks
Bad Coil (COP)
Faulty Powertrain Control Module

Possible Solutions:
Is the engine misfiring presently? If not, the problem is likely intermittent. Try wiggle testing the wiring at the #5 coil and along the wiring harness to the PCM. If manipulating the wiring causes the misfire to surface, repair the wiring problem. Check for poor connection at the coil connector. Verify the harness isn't misrouted or chafing on anything. Repair as necessary

If the engine is misfiring presently, stop the engine and disconnect the #5 coil wiring connector. Then start the engine and check for a driver signal to the #5 coil. Using a scope will give you a visual pattern to observe, but since most people don't have access to one there's an easier way. Use a Voltmeter in AC Hertz scale and see if there's a Hz reading of between 5 and 20 or so that indicates the driver is working. If there is a Hertz signal, then replace the #5 ignition coil. It's likely bad. If you don't detect any frequency signal from the PCM on the ignition coil driver circuit indicating the PCM is grounding/ungrounding the circuit (or there is no visible pattern on the scope if you have one) then leave the coil disconnected and check for DC voltage on the driver circuit at the ignition coil connector. If there is any significant voltage on that wire then there is a short to voltage somewhere. Find the short and repair it.

If there is no voltage on the driver circuit, then turn the ignition off. Disconnect the PCM connector and check the continuity of the driver between the PCM and the coil. If there is no continuity repair the open or short to ground in the circuit. If continuity is present, then check for resistance between ground and the ignition coil connector. There should be infinite resistance. If there isn't, repair the short to ground in the coil driver circuit

NOTE: If the ignition coil driver signal wire is not open or shorted to voltage or ground and there is no trigger signal to the coil then suspect a faulty PCM coil driver. Also keep in mind that if the PCM driver is at fault, there may be a wiring problem that caused the PCM failure. It's a good idea to do the above check after PCM replacement to verify there won't be a repeat failure. If you find that the engine isn't misfiring, the coil is being triggered properly but P0355 is continually being reset, there is the possibility that the PCM coil monitoring system may be faulty.

Test, check it and keep us updated.

Jul 24, 2011 | 1997 Ford Expedition

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