Question about Volvo 240

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My volvo 240 1989 got very hard to start.Sometimes it would become overflow of gas fuel in solex carburetor.Some mechanic said it is carburetor problem,others said crank sensor problem...the first time happen are the car can't be started,I checked no current at ignition cable during starting.I remove crank sensor and found the crank sensor was dirty..clean it and put it back...start ok but sometime my engine was suddenly stop at low speed (idling)...Need help TQ

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 99 Answers

SOURCE: I need to know the

Steps

1. Disconnect the battery
2 Loosen botls so you can remove the drive belt to alternator.
3. If it has a serpertine belt, then pry with proper tool on the tensioner to remove the belt.
4. Disconnect harness to alternator and ground wire if any and filter condenser if any.
5. Loosen bolts to alternator and remove alternator.
6. If AC equipped, not knowing your belt configuration would require to loosen the AC Belt also, depending if your alternator belts is the first one near the engine, then all belts have to be loosen to remove it. unless #3 applies.
Reverse the steps to put it back on.

Posted on Dec 26, 2008

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  • 534 Answers

SOURCE: clutch kit

If a newly installed hydraulic kit leaks after 6 months you need to renew the complete master cylinder or slave cylinder unit.
The leaks are occuring because of wear/corrosion in the metal cylinder.

A brand new unit will operate for many years without further trouble.

Posted on Jun 15, 2009

blueextc3221
  • 15935 Answers

SOURCE: 2001 Chevy Malibu, 89,000 miles, 3.1 engine, won't start

CLICK HERE for the injector schematic.
CLICK HERE for the Ignition schematic.

Since the PCM uses info gatheres from the crank and cam sensors to calculate ignition - and there are no OBD codes - in all likelihood, the PCM itself is bad.

The Ignition Module, also transmits to the PCM.

It appears after all your testing - that the PCM is at fault.

It does not error report on itself (unfortunately).

The ignition timing is controlled by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). No adjustment is necessary (distributorless ignition) or possible.

Please see the following....

The ignition timing is controlled by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). No adjustment is necessary or possible.
The engines covered by this manual are equipped with distributorless ignitions, ignition timing is controlled by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM), as applicable. No adjustments are possible. If ignition timing is not within specification, there is a fault in the engine control system. Diagnose and repair the problem as necessary.
Ignition timing is the measurement, in degrees of crankshaft rotation, of the point at which the spark plugs fire in each of the cylinders. It is measured in degrees before or after Top Dead Center (TDC) of the compression stroke.
Ideally, the air/fuel mixture in the cylinder will be ignited by the spark plug just as the piston passes TDC of the compression stroke. If this happens, the piston will be at the beginning of the power stroke just as the compressed and ignited air/fuel mixture forces the piston down and turns the crankshaft. Because it takes a fraction of a second for the spark plug to ignite the mixture in the cylinder, the spark plug must fire a little before the piston reaches TDC. Otherwise, the mixture will not be completely ignited as the piston passes TDC and the full power of the explosion will not be used by the engine.
The timing measurement is given in degrees of crankshaft rotation before the piston reaches TDC (BTDC). If the setting for the ignition timing is 10 BTDC, each spark plug must fire 10 degrees before each piston reaches TDC. This only holds true, however, when the engine is at idle speed. The combustion process must be complete by 23° ATDC to maintain proper engine performance, fuel mileage, and low emissions.
As the engine speed increases, the pistons go faster. The spark plugs have to ignite the fuel even sooner if it is to be completely ignited when the piston reaches TDC. Spark timing changes are accomplished electronically by the engine and ignition control computers.
If the ignition is set too far advanced (BTDC), the ignition and expansion of the fuel in the cylinder will occur too soon and tend to force the piston down while it is still traveling up. This causes pre ignition or -knocking and pinging-. If the ignition spark is set too far retarded, or after TDC (ATDC), the piston will have already started on its way down when the fuel is ignited. The piston will be forced down for only a portion of its travel, resulting in poor engine performance and lack of power.
Timing marks or scales can be found on the rim of the crankshaft pulley and the timing cover. The marks on the pulley correspond to the position of the piston in the No. 1 cylinder. A stroboscopic (dynamic) timing light is hooked onto the No. 1 cylinder spark plug wire (2.2L engine only, on the 2.4L engines, special adapters are needed) . Every time the spark plug fires, the timing light flashes. By aiming the light at the timing marks while the engine is running, the exact position of the piston within the cylinder can be easily read (the flash of light makes the mark on the pulley appear to be standing still). Proper timing is indicated when the mark and scale are in specified alignment.


WARNING When checking timing with the engine running, take care not to get the timing light wires tangled in the fan blades and/or drive belts.

The engines covered by this manual are equipped with distributorless ignitions, ignition timing is controlled by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM), as applicable. No adjustments are possible. If ignition timing is not within specification, there is a fault in the engine control system. Diagnose and repair the problem as necessary.




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Posted on Aug 18, 2009

  • 1382 Answers

SOURCE: "Cranks, but won't start". Replaced fuel pump, CKP, ICM & nothing

If the engine cranks over normally when you attempt to start you car, but the engine does not start, the problem may be NO FUEL, NO SPARK or NO COMPRESSION. The engine needs adequate fuel pressure, a properly timed spark and normal compression to start.


1) To find why the engine won't start, remove the air inlet tube from the throttle body, push the throttle open and spray a small amount of aerosol starting fluid into the engine. Crank the engine. If it has spark and compression but NO FUEL, it will start and run a few seconds before dying. If it does NOT start, it probably has NO SPARK.

2)Another method to check for spark is to pull a spark plug wire off of a spark plug (if it has plug wires, coil-on-plug ignitions do not) and place the open end of the plug wire near a metal surface on the engine. Have a helper crank the engine while you watch for a spark. DO NOT hold the wire while doing this as it can shock you. If you see a spark, the problem is not spark, but most likely NO FUEL or NO COMPRESSION. If you do not see a spark, the problem is in the IGNITION CIRCUIT.

3)Proper fuel pressure is critical for fuel injected engines to start and run. You should hear the fuel pump inside the fuel tank buzz for a couple of seconds when the ignition is turned on (no buzz means the pump is not running and the engine is not getting fuel). You can smell the tailpipe for gasoline vapors after cranking the engine. If you smell gas, the problem is likely not fuel but NO SPARK. You can also remove the plastic cap and press the schraeder valve test fitting on the fuel rail to see if there is any fuel pressure to the engine (not a very accurate test because fuel pressure must be at a certain level for the engine to start, for that you need a gauge). Even so, no fuel at the fuel rail would tell you fuel is not getting to the engine..

Posted on Aug 27, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: 2001 f150 intermittent idle problem when starting

cHANCES ARE IT IS YOUR IDLE AIR SOLENOID

Posted on Jan 05, 2010

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Sounds like a bad fuel pump or a clogged fuel filter. Hit the gas tank with a rubber hammer when it won't start and try starting out again.
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If your filter is in the line just before the carburetor, take the line off at the filter, then crank the engine over to see if the pump is working. Mechanical fuel pumps will pump gas when the engine is cranking or running. Use a jar or can to catch the gas. If pump is working, fuel will come out in small spurts. It's not under high pressure- carbs don't need high pressure. If no gas comes out of the line, you probably need a new fuel pump. If the pump is working, it could be the filter, but could also be the needle valve and seat at the carb's fuel inlet. Sometimes they get stuck closed and won't let gas into the carburetor.

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A car needs 3 things to start. Air, fuel, and spark. Check that it can get air by removing the air cleaner and inspecting it. Leave the air cleaner off for now. Try a squirt of starting fluid into the carburetor (not a lot mind you, just a quick squirt). Be prepared to quench a flame if the engine backfires through the carburetor (have a wet towel handy). Crank the engine. If it fires, you have spark. If it does not fire, you have ignition problems. If it fires and stalls out quickly, you have fuel problems.
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and here's the document you may need :
http://www.mitsubishi-motors.kiev.ua/info.php?id=20
http://www.lilevo.com/mirage/

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