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Oxygen sensor keeps going bad, Mechanic says that number 4 cylinder is causing the problem.

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It could be the problem or he just wants to make a lot if money. I had a similar problem and it turned out to be electrical. I had another component out that caused an abnormal electrical condition, it could be happening to you. Check to make sure the sensor is within it electrical limits, (volts, amps, and ohms) and then refer to your vehicles electrical schematic to find relative components within the system. Don't go rippin into you motor, yanking off the heads, until you eliminate the problem as being electrical. get a good multimeter and remember, its only a 12v system. good luck

Posted on Aug 15, 2008

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1998 nissan altima trouble code p0135


The code P0135 means O2 sensor heater circuit malfunction bank 1 sensor 1. This means you most likely have a bad O2 sensor. The possible causes are:

TT - Faulty Heated Oxygen Sensor (H2OS) Bank 1 Sensor 1
- Heated Oxygen Sensor (H2OS) Bank 1 Sensor 1 circuit fuse
- Heated Oxygen Sensor (H2OS) Bank 1 Sensor 1 circuit open shorted to ground
- Heated Oxygen Sensor (H2OS) Bank 1 Sensor 1 circuit poor electrical connection
- Faulty Engine Control Module (ECM) Usually the code indicates a bad Oxygen sensor, but an intake vacuum leak or a failing fuel pump can cause the code, so check your intake vacuum hose for a leak or hole. But most likely, you have a faulty Oxygen sensor. Now Bank 1 Sensor 1 means the bad O2 sensor is the one on the number one cylinder side (which is the cylinder closest to the timing belt or where all your belts and pulleys are),which is bank one. If you look really closely, you will see that the number 1 cylinder is just a little bit closer to the belts than the number 2 cylinder. Now that you know which side you are dealing with, the next step is which sensor. There are two O2 sensors on each side (upstream or downstream), four total. Sensor 1 is the upstream sensor, which is before the catalytic converter closest to the exhaust manifold. Number 2 sensor is on or after the catalytic converter. So in short, you are replacing the O2 sensor on the Number 1 cylinder side before the catalytic converter. They are a pain to remove. Get some Pb Blaster lubricating oil and spray on the threads and let sit for 10 minutes and spray it again. You will need a 7/8 Oxygen sensor removal socket to remove it. Don't forget to disconnect negative battery terminal and O2 wire harness first.. Any questions please feel free to email me. Good luck.

Nov 30, 2013 | 1998 Nissan Altima

Tip

Which Oxygen Sensor Is It?


There are many inquiries online about which oxygen sensor to change. Oxygen sensor failure codes are very common on a lot of vehicles. With all of today's vehicles having at least two oxygen sensors and many having three or four of them, it can be a little confusing as to which one is causing the problem.

Before we get into which sensor is which, we need to have a little discussion about oxygen sensor fault codes. There are several different types of oxygen sensor fault codes. Here are just some of the most common ones:

P0135 "Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit Bank1 Sensor 1"
P0141 "Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit Bank 1 Sensor 2"
P0147 "Oxygen Sensor Circuit Bank 1 Sensor 3"
P0152 "Oxygen Sensor Voltage High Bank 2 Sensor 1"
P0159 "Oxygen Sensor Slow Response Bank 2 Sensor 2"
P0171 "Oxygen Sensor Lean Sensor 1 Bank 1"
P0172 "Oxygen Sensor Lean Sensor 1 Bank 2"
P0174 "Oxygen Sensor Rich Sensor 1 Bank 1"
P0175 "Oxygen Sensor Rich Sensor 1 Bank 2"

There are many more possible oxygen sensor codes, but I only listed these to make my point. Many times the oxygen sensor code is NOT caused by the oxygen sensor itself. "Lean" or "Rich" oxygen sensor codes (i.e. P0171, P0174) are usually caused by something other than the oxygen sensor. Something is wrong, causing the engine to run lean (not enough fuel or too much air) or causing the engine to run rich (too much fuel or not enough air). In these cases, replacing the oxygen sensor will not fix a thing. (That is, unless you are trying to fix your bank account from having too high of a balance!) The new oxygen sensor will just set the same code as the original one. This is because the oxygen sensor is not CAUSING the problem, it is only REPORTING the problem.

High voltage codes (like P0152 above) can be caused by the oxygen sensor wires being shorted to another wire inside the wiring harness. Sometimes these codes are caused by bad grounds where some other component is trying to ground through the oxygen sensor circuit. Again, replacing the oxygen sensor will not fix this! In short, the problem needs to be diagnosed before running out and buying an oxygen sensor.

Just because a fault code has "Oxygen Sensor" or "O2 Sensor" or "O2S" in its description does not necessarily mean that an oxygen sensor needs to be replaced. Many do-it-yourselfers believe that all there is to fixing the car is to hook it to the "magic box", collect the fault codes and replace the parts the computer tells you to replace. There is nothing further from the truth.

Fault codes only point you toward which SYSTEM is failing. The system must be diagnosed to find the CAUSE of the failure. If this is not done properly, it will only result in wasting a bunch of your money. This is what you were trying to avoid by doing it yourself!

So, after reading all of the above, if you think you still want to replace an oxygen sensor, but don't know which one; here is how to figure it out:

Oxygen sensors are always numbered like this:

Bank 1 Sensor 1
Bank 2 Sensor 1
Bank 1 Sensor 2
Bank 2 Sensor 2

Some manufacturers use a kind of shorthand that reads different, but means the same thing:

Sensor 1/1 or O2s 1/1
Sensor 2/1 or O2s 2/1
Sensor 1/2 or O2s 1/2
Sensor 2/2 or O2s 2/2

Bank 1 is always the side of the engine where cylinder #1 is located and, of course, Bank 2 is the opposite side.
On a 4 cylinder engine, there is only one bank and it is always referred to as Bank 1. The exception to the 4 cylinder rule is on certain 4 cylinder engines (specifically, some Toyotas) there are two catalytic converters used. In this case, Bank 1 sensors will still be in the pipe for the catalyst that is connected to cylinder #1 and Bank 2 sensors will be in the other one.

Sensor 1 is always the "upstream" sensor (the one located BEFORE the catalytic converter).
Sensor 2 is always the "downstream" sensor (the one that is located AFTER the catalytic converter).
Sensor 3 refers to the ONLY "downstream" sensor where there are two sensors before the catalyst and only one after the catalyst. On very few vehicles the reference to this reads "Bank 1 Sensor 3".

If you do not know where cylinder #1 is, then you need to get a diagram of the firing order for your engine. Just post a question on FixYa.com and make sure you give the YEAR, MAKE, MODEL, and ENGINE SIZE of your vehicle and one or more of our experts will be happy to tell you how to find cylinder #1.

- DTTECH
ASE Certified Master Automobile Technician


Also check out this article by dttech: What Else Could Be Wrong?

on Apr 29, 2011 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2008 mercury milan misfires


take it back to the dealer they didnt install the coil or electric distubutor properly because of the misfire its causes o2 sensor to give bad reading .

Apr 26, 2012 | Mercury Milan Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I have research around and found that the Bank 1 sensor 3 O2 sensor is post Cat. But when I got under there I dont see anything that could resemble a sensor. Where is it. Please help. Marc


try this
ALLDATA Editor's Note: Always verify #1 cylinder location prior to diagnosis and repair.

- Cylinder bank number one is the bank that contains number one cylinder.


See: Firing Order


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Cylinder #1 on left side.

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Cylinder #1 on right side.

- The first oxygen sensor in cylinder bank # 1 is numbered O2 Sensor 1/1.
- The second oxygen sensor in cylinder bank # 1 is numbered O2 Sensor 1/2.
- A third oxygen sensor in cylinder bank # 1 would be numbered O2 Sensor 1/3.
- The first oxygen sensor in cylinder bank # 2 is numbered O2 Sensor 2/1.
- The second oxygen sensor in cylinder bank # 2 is numbered O2 Sensor 1/1.



- If a V-6 or V-8 vehicle only uses one downstream Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) it is numbered O2 Sensor 1/2, even if it uses two upstream HO2S.
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Jun 03, 2011 | 2001 Dodge Stratus

2 Answers

Bank 1 sensor 2 location on a 1996 chevy suburban


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Fig. Fig. 3: Oxygen sensor-4.3L engines


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Fig. Fig. 4: Oxygen sensor-5.0L and 5.7L engines





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Fig. Fig. 5: Oxygen sensor-7.4L engines




Oxygen sensors are always numbered like this:
Bank 1 sensor 1
Bank 2 sensor 1
Bank 1 sensor 2
Bank 2 sensor 2

Some manufacturers use a kind of shorthand that reads different, but means the same thing:
Sensor 1/1 or O2s 1/1
Sensor 2/1 or O2s 2/1
Sensor 1/2 or O2s 1/2
Sensor 2/2 or O2s 2/2

Bank 1 is always the side of the engine where cylinder number 1 is located and, of coarse, Bank 2 is the opposite side.
On a 4 cylinder engine, there is only 1 bank and it is always referred to as Bank 1.

Sensor 1 is always the upstream sensor (the one located BEFORE the catalytic converter)
Sensor 2 is always the downstream sensor (the one that is located AFTER the catalytic converter.

Hope helps (remember to rate this).



Dec 12, 2010 | Chevrolet Suburban Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

2002 FORD ESCAPE ENGINE LIGHT CAME ON SCAN READS PO430 PO304 PO306



P0304 Code - Cylinder #4 Misfire

A P0304 code means that the the car's computer has detected that one of the engine's cylinders is not firing properly. In this case it's cylinder #4. FB.init("dd7d9e9681341cde77587bc6a2029f6f"); OBD-Codes.com on Facebook

P0306 Code - Cylinder #6 Misfire

A P0306 code means that the the car's computer has detected that one of the engine's cylinders is not firing properly. In this case it's cylinder #6. FB.init("dd7d9e9681341cde77587bc6a2029f6f"); OBD-Codes.com on Facebook

Symptoms may include:
  • the engine may be harder to start
  • the engine may stumble / stumble, and/or hesitate
  • other symptoms may also be present

Causes: A code P0304 may mean that one or more of the following has happened:
  • Faulty spark plug or wire
  • Faulty coil (pack)
  • Faulty oxygen sensor(s)
  • Faulty fuel injector
  • Burned exhaust valve
  • Faulty catalytic converter(s)
  • Running out of fuel
  • Poor compression
  • Defective computer
Possible Solutions: If there are no symptoms, the simplest thing to do is to reset the code and see if it comes back. If there are symptoms such as the engine is stumbling or hesitating, check all wiring and connectors that lead to the cylinders (i.e. spark plugs). Depending on how long the ignition components have been in the car, it may be a good idea to replace them as part of your regular maintenance schedule. I would suggest spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor cap, and rotor (if applicable). Otherwise, check the coils (a.k.a. coil packs). In some cases, the catalytic converter has gone bad. If you smell rotten eggs in the exhaust, your cat converter needs to be replaced. I've also heard in other cases the problems were faulty fuel injectors.


P0430 Code - Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold (Bank 2)
Basically this means that the oxygen sensor downstream of the catalytic converter on bank 2 is detecting that the converter is not working as efficiently as it should be (according to specs). It is part of the vehicle emissions system.

Symptoms:
You will likely not notice any drivability problems, although there may be symptoms such as a rough/hard idle when cold.

Causes: A code P0430 may mean that one or more of the following has happened:
* The catalytic converter is no longer functioning properly
* An oxygen sensor is not reading (functioning) properly
* There is an exhaust leak

Possible Solutions:
- First, inspect for exhaust leaks.
- Next step is to measure the voltage at the oxygen sensor on Bank 2. In fact, it would be a good idea to test each oxygen O2 sensor while you're at it.

One thing to note is that many vehicle manufacturers offer a longer warranty on emissions-related parts. So if you have a newer car but it's out of it's bumper-to-bumper warranty, there still may be warranty on this type of problem. Many manufacturers give a five year, unlimited mileage warranty on these items. It's worth checking into.


Hope helps (remember rated and comment this).

Aug 04, 2010 | Ford Escape Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Oxygen sensor been replace more than 6 times 2003 cts cuts out


something keeps blowing the O2 sensor out...may be bad plug wires...the engine gettign too much gas...too little gas you would have to bring to a good mechanic not dealership

Aug 06, 2009 | 2005 Cadillac CTS

2 Answers

Oxygen Sensors out on Pontiac Grand Am 2003 V6


Your car is equipped with a diagnostic system called OBD II. You can purchase a code reader and use it to find which O2 sensor is causing the problem. You probably have 4 sensors. 2 in front of the converter and 2 behind. The code reader will indicate something like "SEN 1 BANK 1." This means O2 sensor in front of the cat. on the side of the engine that contains cylinder 1. You may see "SEN 2 BANK 1" "SEN 1 BANCK 2" "SEN 2 BANK 2" Bank 2 indicates oppisite side of No.1 cylinder. Hope this helps

Apr 25, 2009 | 2003 Pontiac Grand Am

2 Answers

Showing PO420 and PO304 code


MAP sensor, Maybe, but doubt it.

When the misfire monitor detects a misfire, it will trigger the check engine light with the specific cylinder number as the last digit in the P030X code. For instance cylinder 1 misfire is P0301, cylinder 2 is P0302 etc. In this case we are left with a P0304 in the computer memory. Which is cylinder 4.
Possible Causes:

Fuel injectors, related wiring, sensors and computer issues
Running out of gas, or poor fuel quality
Evaporative emissions system (EVAP) concerns: fuel vapors leaking into engine
Incorrect Fuel Pressure
EGR system concerns: leaking EGR valve or restricted ports
Base engine concerns: low compression, valve train problems and timing issues
Ignition system concerns including, but not limited to:
Faulty spark plugs
Faulty coil or related wiring
Ignition module or related wiring issues
Ignition related sensor faults or wiring issues
This maybe causing PO420 code to go off.
Which is:
P0420 Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold (Bank 1)

There is one O2 (oxygen) sensor in front of the catalytic converter (called upstream), and one behind it (downstream). When the engine is warmed up and running normally the upstream oxygen sensor reading fluctuates and the downstream one is fairly steady. In the case where both readings are fairly steady, a P0420 check engine light code is set.

Possible Causes:

Oxygen (O2) sensor not working correctly
Damaged or leaking exhuast (pipe, manifold, catalytic converter)
Damaged catalytic converter

Mar 24, 2009 | 2003 Pontiac Grand Am

1 Answer

2000 CIVIC System too lean Cylinder 3 and 4 misfire Deteced


  1. P0171: This means that the oxygen sensor has detected a lean air-fuel ratio. This can be caused due to a vaccuum leak or a problem in the HO2S circuit or the HO2S (Heated Oxygen Sensor) itself. (Bank one Sensor one). This is commonly located along the exhaust pipe. It could also be a bad Mass Air Flow sensor or a bad Engine Coolant Temperature sensor. Diagnostic checks will be needed to be carried out to be verified though
  2. Well as for the other codes, it means #3&4 cylinders are misfiring. It is a possibility that the P0171 code mite have caused the others to show up. I can be wrong though. But it is a strong possibility. If the air fuel mixtue is too lean indeed, mis-firing will occur, unless it is an actual electronic and not a mechnical problem. By the way, when these codes appear, how is the engine's performance. Does it remain the same or behaves poorly?

Feb 14, 2009 | 1999 Honda Civic

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