Question about Ford Crown Victoria

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The charging system will not charge the battery, even though I have replaced the starter selonoid, the alternator, the voltage regulator and the battery, the connector to the voltage reg, and battery cables. Please help if possible with a solution. Thanks

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  • Ford Master
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U may have computer issues-scan for codes--chec all fuses including the maxifuse in engine area-some appear normal--a relay, module or wiring cud have flaws

Posted on May 18, 2011

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" HI " Where is the Voltage Regulator Located on a 2002 Dodge Stratus R/T 3.0


The way to check for an over or under charge is to connect your volt meter to the battery, before starting the vehicle.
You should have a reading of 12.5 to 13 volts. If it's 11.8 like you stated or less, it means battery is not fully charged, or it's bad. Now start the car & check voltage again while running the engine, the voltage should exceed 14+ volts, this means your Alternator is charging, the voltage should drop after battery has been charging for awhile. When you turn the engine off after letting it charge the battery, & if the battery is good, you should now have 12.5 volts to 13 volts.
Now to answer your question, the Voltage Regulator is inside of the Altenator, I believe you xcan take the alternator apart to replace it, or simpler to just replace the complete alternator.

Nov 15, 2014 | 2002 Dodge Stratus

1 Answer

Battery good, alternator good, starter good but my 1966 oldsmobile the alternator isn't charging the battery


Have you replaced the voltage regulator?
Unless you have changed the charging system and eliminated it, the alternator does not have a built-in voltage regulator like the newer ones do.
Be blessed.

Feb 06, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2nd newly rebuilt alternator burning out.


Due to the nature of the battery technology used with vehicles the alternator is mostly incapable of charging the battery. The car alternator is designed to keep a fully charged battery fully charged and to provide all the power for the car equipment.

The alternator charge rate is regulated by a voltage regulator. Because the alternator output is connected to the battery, the alternator and battery voltage will be the same and the voltage regulator monitors that voltage.

The lower the battery voltage the more output the alternator will produce in order to correct the situation but because a lead acid battery has a high internal resistance to accepting a charge the terminal voltage will quickly rise to the alternator regulated voltage and fool the alternator into thinking the battery is fully charged when the output will drop to the order of just a couple of amps.

Switch on the headlights or a similar load that will lower the battery voltage and the alternator will increase it's output again - but only by the amount of current the headlamps or other load is consuming.
It matters not what the alternator rated maximum output is, it is designed to provide only the necessary current and no more.

The only time an alternator should ever need to produce maximum output is when on a dedicated testbed and then only for a short duration to avoid damaging the unit. Testing the current output on a modern vehicle is not recommended except for the regulated voltage testing and a rule-of-thumb output test where all equipment is switched on and the engine speed raised while the battery voltage is monitored.

Most modern alternators use an internal voltage regulator but a few systems use a separate voltage regulator. No alternator rebuild would be complete without a regulator test and probably a new or replacement regulator, which is where the majority of charging system problems are, or the brush gear.
Assuming the wiring is ok, no alternator should suffer any harm if the voltage regulator and auxilliary diodes (if fitted) are in good order though fitting a defective or a discharged battery can cause it to overheat and be damaged.

The alternator usually just about stops producing an output when the battery voltage is in the region of 14.5/14.8 volts.
Your description indicates the voltage regulator is not working correctly - unless 40 amps was being consumed by the car equipment the alternator should not have been producing 40 amps.. I suggest you also have your battery tested

May 12, 2017 | 1988 Acura Legend

1 Answer

New battery, alternator, starter and the battery still wont stay charged


voltage regulator is what would cause this problem, but according to alternator stats on this veh it shows the voltage is regulated by the onboard computer. it appears that this is what may be the problem. (initially were the terminals crossed,and poss short the system? if so then looks as though you would need to replace the ecm/onboard computer)

Sep 09, 2012 | 2001 Ford Windstar

3 Answers

Was starting fine, new battery. Now, only hear the click of the starter solenoid. Is there a fuse that could be blown (was starting but had to jump a few times, then would not even jump)? I tried hitting...


Your new battery is probably discharged.
Here are the things that cause it. And the things that don't.

The voltage regulator controls how much electricity is used to charge the battery and how much is going into the electrical system of the car. The electrical system may has been designed to integrate the voltage regulator into the case of the alternator. If that is the issue, the alternator can be replaced, or if there is a skilled person that does rebuilds in your area, he will know how to change the diodes in the voltage regulating section of the alternator. You can save money this way. If you have a volt meter or a multimeter. Commonly around $25.00 these days, you should get a reading of around 12 volts from the battery when it is charged and the engine is off. If the battery is down, the voltage should still be in that area, but not enough of a kick behind it to do anything but light a small bulb. When the car is started and the voltage regulator is doing it's job you should get at least 13.5 volts DC at the battery terminals.

Many of the symptoms that occur also happen because of poor electrical contact at the battery.
Use Baking soda and water to clean the terminals of the battery of corrosion. And then use a battery cleaning tool for the battery posts and the battery wire clamps that go around the post. Make sure all of the connectors and wiring is sound.

I would then test all of this doing the following steps..

Charge up the battery.

Then connect the system and do the voltage checks. If the Battery is charging properly, the regulator will gradually reduce the charging voltage it is using to charge.

After 15 minutes, shut the engine down and check the battery voltage. and turn on the headlights to see if they are still bright.

If the voltage is at 12 volts DC the battery will live. If you are not getting enough charging voltage, which I believe is the situation then the voltage will constantly be to low at the battery. It will be the battery running the car and the bulbs and other things will go lower and lower.

One very simple test of a charging system is to charge the battery, start the engine, then pull the positive terminal off of the battery. If the engine dies, then the voltage being generated from the alternator is too weak.

Hope all of this helps,
Happy New Year,
Mark

Jan 02, 2011 | 1985 Mitsubishi Mighty Max

1 Answer

Battery will not charge, first time its ever did this. rebuilt alternator new battery and new starter not to sure if new starter has anything to do with battery chargin but replaced it anyway, has good...


A bad voltage regulator could cause the problem. Assuming the alternator is working correctly. Jump the vehicle with the battery disconnected and then disconnect the jumper cables. If the vehicle dies your voltage regulator or Alternator are bad, some vehicle have separate regulators from the alternator, if it continues to run the alternator is good but the voltage regulator is probably the cause.

Aug 08, 2010 | 1984 Oldsmobile Cutlass

3 Answers

1985 chrysler 5th ave ran out of gas and now it won't start. When i try, it just does a rapid clicking noise


Sounds like the battery has lost charge. Charge it overnight at 2-4 amp rate. If it now starts ok, measure the battery voltage with the engine idling--it should read 13.5 to 14.5 volts. If it reads less than 12.6 volts, the alternator is not charging the battery. Take the car to an auto parts store and have them test the battery, alternator, and voltage regulator (usually for free). They will be happy to sell you any needed parts. Hope this helps!

Apr 14, 2010 | 1985 Chrysler Fifth Avenue

1 Answer

Car won't start. Replaced battery. worked 3 days. They said it was the alternator. REplaced with new. worked another 4 days. had it check with advance auto said battery good, starter cranking normal....


if there is no charging then its back to the alternator or the way its hooked up? did you recharge your flat battery with a mains charger after it went flat the first time? as no alternator will charge a battery from flat to fully charged,,,,even if you drove around the world none stop! the new alternator may have given up working becouse you overloaded the voltage regulator trying to recharge a flat battery witch would mean it was very week to start with?

Nov 15, 2009 | Pontiac GTO Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Interior lights on but car wont start


STARTING YOUR DIAGNOSIS
What happens when you attempt to start the engine? If nothing happens when you turn the key,"http://www.aa1car.com/library/2003/us20310.htm"to determine its state of charge. Many starters won't do a thing unless there is at least 10 volts available from the battery. A low battery does not necessarily mean the battery is the problem, though. The battery may have been run down by prolonged cranking while trying to start the engine. Or, the battery's low state of charge may be the result of a charging system problem. Either way, the battery needs to be recharged and tested.
If the battery is low, the next logical step might be to try starting the engine with another battery or a charger. If the engine cranks normally and roars to life, you can assume the problem was a dead battery, or a charging problem that allowed the battery to run down. If the battery accepts a charge and tests okay, checking the output of the charging system should help you identify any problems there.
A "http://www.aa1car.com/library/2002/cm10220.htm" that is working properly should produce a charging voltage of somewhere around 14 volts at idle with the lights and accessories off. When the engine is first started, the charging voltage should rise quickly to about two volts above base battery voltage, then taper off, leveling out at the specified voltage. The exact charging voltage will vary according to the battery's state of charge, the load on the electrical system, and temperature. The lower the temperature, the higher the charging voltage. The higher the temperature, the lower the charging voltage. The charging range for a typical alternator might be 13.9 to 14.4 volts at 80 degrees F, but increase to 14.9 to 15.8 volts at subzero temperatures.
If the charging system is not putting out the required voltage, is it the alternator or the regulator? Full fielding the alternator to bypass the regulator should tell you if it is working correctly. Or, take the alternator to a parts store and have it bench tested. If the charging voltage goes up when the regulator is bypassed, the problem is the regulator (or the engine computer in the case of computer-regulated systems). If there is no change in output voltage, the alternator is the culprit.
Many times one or more diodes in the alternator rectifier assembly will have failed, causing a drop in the unit's output. The alternator will still produce current, but not enough to keep the battery fully charged. This type of failure will show up on an oscilloscope as one or more missing humps in the alternator waveform. Most charging system analyzers can detect this type of problem.
thanks,please rate the solution positively.

Nov 06, 2009 | 1985 Buick Century

1 Answer

Battery? Alternator? or what?


Hi and welcome to FixYa,

Initially, it could be the alternator or more specifically the voltage regulator inside the alternator. The function of the alternator is to produce the necessary charging voltage to replenish the charge of the battery. This voltage is then funneled and controlled by the regulator. Of course even if the alternator/regulator is good, there could be other possible reason(s) why the battery looses or is not charging such as loose wire/connector/terminals or a partial electrical short/fault draining the battery when parked.

To crank (turnover) the car's engine, a starter is used.

Good luck and Thank you for using FixYa.

Jan 05, 2009 | 2003 BMW 325

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