Question about 1992 Mercury Topaz

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Replaceing starter friend gave me the car, said it needed new starter, got it , tight fit, three wires, one plugs, do the other two go on the starter post?

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Yes they go to the starter post, they are the power source for the rest of the electrical system, they are called fuse links.

Posted on Aug 19, 2008

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Car issues


WHAT CONDITION ARE YOUR BATTERY CABLES ? THEY MAY SEEM OK, BUT SOMETIMES REPLACEMENT IS NECESSARY ! BATTERY TERMINALS MUST BE CLEANED, SMEAR SOME VASOLINE ON TERMINALS BEFORE MOUNTING THEM, BESURE TERMINALS ARE TIGHT !!! THE (NEGATIVE) CABLE OR GROUND IS VERY IMPORTANT ! A GOOD CONNECTION IS PARAMOUNT !!! INSPECT STARTER/SOLONOID CONNECTIONS, THEY MUST BE CLEAN, PROPERLY CONNECTED , TIGHT !!! TIGHT IS TIGHT, TOO TIGHT IS BROKE !!! MAKE SURE BATTERY IS IN GOOD,CLEAN CONDITION, FULLY CHARGED !!! YOU DID REPLACE THE STARTER WITH A NEW SOLONOID I HOPE ! ITS THIS ELECTRO-MAGNET THAT INGAGES THE STARTER INTO THE FLYWHEEL TO CRANK THE ENGINE . THEY WORK TOGETHER ! TAPPING ON THE STARTER TELLS ME, POSSIBLE LOOSE CONNECTION, EITHER INSIDE OR OUTSIDE SOLONOID . ALTERNATOR PROBLEM ? TAKE TO AUTOPARTS STORE, HAVE THEM CHECK BOTH THE BATTERY & ALTERNATOR . ITS FREE ! CHECK THE ALTERNATOR BELT FOR WEAR, WHETHER ITS TIGHT, LOOSE, ETC., A WORN OR LOOSE BELT WILL SLIP, NOT ALLOWING THE ALTERNATOR TO DO ITS JOB, CHARGING THE BATTERY !!! ONE MORE THING, ITS IMPORTANT TO KEEP THE ENGINE TUNED-UP, ESPECIALLY BOTH AIR & FUEL FILTERS, SPARK PLUGS & PLUG WIRES SHOULD BE REPLACED AS WELL, THEY DO WEAR OUT !!! DISTRIBUTOR CAP & ROTOR NEED ATTENTION ALSO, REPLACE THEM ! BACK TOO YOUR SRARTER/SOLONOID, SOMETIMES EVEN NEW ELECTRICAL PARTS GO BAD, IT HAPPENS ALOT, THEY COME FROM MEXICO, CHINA, ETC., NEED I SAY MORE ???

Mar 24, 2013 | Dodge Grand Caravan Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Remove starter from 300touring 2006


Instructions
    • Lift the hood and find the battery. Disconnect both battery cables, starting with the negative cable first. You will need an open-ended wrench to loosen the nuts on the cable ends.
    • 2Jack your Chrysler up. Place it on jack stands, placing the stands under the frame. Locate the old starter on the bottom of the engine. Remove the heat shield from around the starter and remove the two wires running to the starter.
    • 3
    • Remove the three bolts holding the starter to the engine. Turn the starter toward the engine and pull the starter out. The starter must be in the right position to get it past the motor mount. Work the starter down and out, then lay it aside. The starter has a core value you will get back when you return it to where you purchased it.
    • 4Work the new starter back up past the motor mount and put the starter in place. Be sure to line up the starter shim and replace all three bolts. You will need a socket and extension and a ratchet to replace the bolts.
    • 5Replace the two wires to the starter. Double check all bolts to ensure they are tight. Replace the heat shield around the starter. Jack up the vehicle and remove the jack stands from under the frame. Let the car down.
    • 6Clean both battery cable ends. Replace them on the battery and tighten with a wrench.

Aug 23, 2012 | 2006 Chrysler 300

1 Answer

Starter replacement


  • Check the condition of the battery. A weak battery can't turn the starter over. Make sure thesultansikand.jpg battery is at full strength before you blame the starter. Your car's instrument cluster should indicate when there is a low battery with either a warning light or ammeter.
  • Also check the battery connections, the wires going to the starter, and the starter connection. The most important wire is the big one running down the back of the battery. It is the wire that goes from the battery to the starter. All connections should be snug. Check that the insulation on the wires is intact. Tighten any connections loose enough to wiggle by hand.
  • Check the starter solenoid. The starter solenoid is a special switch that turns the starter on and off. Solenoids rarely cost more than $10, and they are fairly easy to replace. When you turn the key, have a friend listen to the solenoid for a clicking sound. If there's no sound, assume the solenoid is broken and needs to be replaced.
  • If the automotive engine is turning over and still won't start, it might be due to another problem unrelated to the starter or battery. Anything from a dirty air filter, worn spark plugs, bad spark plug wires, a worn distributor cap, insufficient fuel reaching the engine or even blown gaskets can prevent a car from starting. If you can't isolate the problem through trial and error, it may be time to take the car to a mechanic for check-up or repair.

    Once you've determined that the problem is not resolved by troubleshooting the above issues, it may very well be that you need to replace the starter.

  • Disconnect the battery cables in order to reduce the possibility of accidentally shocking yourself.
  • Remove the electrical connections from the side of the starter. There are usually two wires: a positive and a negative wire. Remove the positive wire first, and then remove the negative wire from the starter. You may want to mark the connections with a paint pen to help you correctly reconnect the connectors to their proper terminals. To remove the connections, you'll need to use an open face wrench or socket wrench to remove the bolts.
    After both of the electrical connections are removed, you'll need to unbolt the starter from the chassis. Before you remove these bolts, take note of how the starter is oriented. You may want to mark the bolts with paint pens. There are usually only two or three bolts that attach the starter to the vehicle.
  • Remove the starter. In preparation, look closely at your car and determine what path will be easiest for removing the starter. It might be a tight fit, but you'll need to twist and pull the starter around various engine and frame parts in order to get it out of the car. Some cars may be particularly tight, especially those with front wheel drive. You may have to remove other parts in order to get enough space the pull the starter out. If you do remove engine parts, take care to remember their proper location. Replace bolts into the same place they came from once you pull a piece off. This will help you keep up with all of the pieces.
  • Once you've pulled the starter out, you can put the new starter in its place. You'll need to put it back in the exact same way you pulled the old starter out. Once you have it in place, put in a bolt just enough to hold the starter in place. Then connect the electrical connections beginning with the ground wire. Once the ground wire is connected, attach the rest of the wiring. Next, install the rest of the bolts holding the starter to the frame. Check to see that all bolts are tight.

Jul 06, 2011 | Ford E-350 Super Duty Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Trying to take off starter on my 1999 ford f150 4.6 liter is it hard to take off or should i just take it in to a mechanic


tqojcaj3377, Most starters are held in place with three bolts. As you are standing in front of your vehicle facing the engine it is located on the left lower side of the engine. The first thing you do is disconnect the negative battery cable and set it aside away from the battery. Get under the vehicle. F150's have enough room under there so you wont have to jack up the vehicle. Take a light with you. Using a 13mm wrench or socket, remove the large power wire from the starter. Using either an 8mm or 10mm wrench or socket, remove the small wire. Sometimes this wire is just plugged in. Using a 13mm wrench or socket, remove the three bolts holding the starter. The third one is at the top of the starter and sometimes is hard to get at. Use a socket and ratchet with an extension for this one. Remove the starter. Clean the wire connections with some sandpaper or emery cloth. Reverse the procedure to replace it with the new one. Make sure that the wire connections are just snug and not too tight so you don't damage the solenoid. Replace the battery cable and try the starter at least three times to ensure that the starter and wires are tight enough. Good luck with this.

May 08, 2011 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Removing a starter from a 94 new yorker


  • Check the condition of the battery. A weak battery can't turn the starter over. Make sure the battery is at full strength before you blame the starter. Your car's instrument cluster should indicate when there is a low battery with either a warning light or ammeter.
  • Also check the battery connections, the wires going to the starter, and the starter connection. The most important wire is the big one running down the back of the battery. It is the wire that goes from the battery to the starter. All connections should be snug. Check that the insulation on the wires is intact. Tighten any connections loose enough to wiggle by hand.
  • Check the starter solenoid. The starter solenoid is a special switch that turns the starter on and off. Solenoids rarely cost more than $10, and they are fairly easy to replace. When you turn the key, have a friend listen to the solenoid for a clicking sound. If there's no sound, assume the solenoid is broken and needs to be replaced.
  • If the automotive engine is turning over and still won't start, it might be due to another problem unrelated to the starter or battery. Anything from a dirty air filter, worn spark plugs, bad spark plug wires, a worn distributor cap, insufficient fuel reaching the engine or even blown gaskets can prevent a car from starting. If you can't isolate the problem through trial and error, it may be time to take the car to a mechanic for check-up or repair.

Once you've determined that the problem is not resolved by troubleshooting the above issues, it may very well be that you need to replace the starter.

  1. Disconnect the battery cables in order to reduce the possibility of accidentally shocking yourself.



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  2. Remove the electrical connections from the side of the starter. There are usually two wires: a positive and a negative wire. Remove the positive wire first, and then remove the negative wire from the starter. You may want to mark the connections with a paint pen to help you correctly reconnect the connectors to their proper terminals. To remove the connections, you'll need to use an open face wrench or socket wrench to remove the bolts.
    After both of the electrical connections are removed, you'll need to unbolt the starter from the chassis. Before you remove these bolts, take note of how the starter is oriented. You may want to mark the bolts with paint pens. There are usually only two or three bolts that attach the starter to the vehicle.
  3. Remove the starter. In preparation, look closely at your car and determine what path will be easiest for removing the starter. It might be a tight fit, but you'll need to twist and pull the starter around various engine and frame parts in order to get it out of the car. Some cars may be particularly tight, especially those with front wheel drive. You may have to remove other parts in order to get enough space the pull the starter out. If you do remove engine parts, take care to remember their proper location. Replace bolts into the same place they came from once you pull a piece off. This will help you keep up with all of the pieces.
  4. Once you've pulled the starter out, you can put the new starter in its place. You'll need to put it back in the exact same way you pulled the old starter out. Once you have it in place, put in a bolt just enough to hold the starter in place. Then connect the electrical connections beginning with the ground wire. Once the ground wire is connected, attach the rest of the wiring. Next, install the rest of the bolts holding the starter to the frame. Check to see that all bolts are tight.

Dec 10, 2010 | 1994 Chrysler New Yorker

2 Answers

2001 jeep cherokee has new starter and not always


Replace the terminal end ,with a new one that fits tight.

Nov 14, 2009 | 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

I drive an hour each way to work. My 1989 Buick LeSabre Limited drives beautifully for about 1/2 an hour. Once it heats up, the "service engine" light comes on the "temp" idiot light flashes and the motor...


Remove battery cables from battery and clean all three of them and the battery side post. Replace bolts. Have seen this a lot working at a buick dealership. One of thee + cables goes to the starter and the other +cable runs the electronics and it appears that you have a bad connection.

Sep 29, 2009 | 1989 Buick LeSabre

1 Answer

Rotor button?


The rotor button is located under the distributor cap (what the other end of the spark plug wire plugs into).  It should be held on by one phillips head screw and take a couple minutes to change out.  As far as the wires go, I had the same problem with the aftermarket wires on my 89 honda.  I'm assuming you have aftermarkter wires by now too.  I would suggest trying Bosch OEM wireset if you don't already have them.  For some reason they don't fit very tight with the cheaper ones.  Let me know if you have any other questions.  Thanks for rating my response and for using FixYa!

Jun 20, 2009 | 1990 Honda Accord

2 Answers

My car wont start


its possibly the cylinoid or the ignition try testing the starter, let me know if that works...

May 23, 2009 | 1993 Pontiac Bonneville

1 Answer

I have a grand marquis 1993 and the car wouldnt start although the batteries r good i was told by a mechanic it is the starter . I need to know can I replace the starter by myself and what do i need to do...


I would always suggest having a mechanic do things first and only try yourself if you think you can do it and you do not have the money for a mechanic that can give you a warranty.

Disconnect the battery cables in order to reduce the possibility of accidentally shocking yourself.

Remove the electrical connections from the side of the starter. There are usually two wires: a positive and a negative wire. Remove the positive wire first, and then remove the negative wire from the starter. You may want to mark the connections with a paint pen to help you correctly reconnect the connectors to their proper terminals. To remove the connections, you'll need to use an open face wrench or socket wrench to remove the bolts.
After both of the electrical connections are removed, you'll need to unbolt the starter from the chassis. Before you remove these bolts, take note of how the starter is oriented. You may want to mark the bolts with paint pens. There are usually only two or three bolts that attach the starter to the vehicle.

Remove the starter. In preparation, look closely at your car and determine what path will be easiest for removing the starter. It might be a tight fit, but you'll need to twist and pull the starter around various engine and frame parts in order to get it out of the car. Some cars may be particularly tight, especially those with front wheel drive. You may have to remove other parts in order to get enough space the pull the starter out. If you do remove engine parts, take care to remember their proper location. Replace bolts into the same place they came from once you pull a piece off. This will help you keep up with all of the pieces.

Once you've pulled the starter out, you can put the new starter in its place. You'll need to put it back in the exact same way you pulled the old starter out. Once you have it in place, put in a bolt just enough to hold the starter in place. Then connect the electrical connections beginning with the ground wire. Once the ground wire is connected, attach the rest of the wiring. Next, install the rest of the bolts holding the starter to the frame. Check to see that all bolts are tight.

Dec 18, 2008 | 1993 Mercury Grand Marquis

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