Question about 2001 Ford Super Duty F 450

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Ford f 550

My brakes are not working properly and i already replaced all te brake pads and shoes and now there is a noise in the brake that messes up my power steering i have power steering and brake fluid but it is very difficult to stop and steer.

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Check the vacum pressure. You should be pulling in excess of 14psi. If low vacum you booster will not provide the necessary braking force when you press the pedal. Your vacum pump my be going bas.

Posted on Dec 23, 2008

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Not a lot to go on! This truck is a diesel?????? If so check that your fanbelts are in good shape and adjusted propperly. That should fix it!

Posted on Oct 24, 2008

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2 Answers

Just had front brakes done but still hearing squealing from brakes do you no why this would be


Squealing from brakes when applied (and sometimes even when not) is a common issue with many vehicles. There are a number of reasons for it, most often it is the brake shoes/pads themselves. Most manufacturers today install ceramic brake pads as OEM parts, but due to their cost, most drivers opt for semi-metallic pads when replacing them. Most manufacturers recommend anti-squeal shims and/or compound be applied to brake pads for disc systems, but they are often ignored and not installed. Older, sticky calipers can also cause poor release of brake pads, resulting in drag and noise. Lastly, worn, warped, and thin rotors can add to noise issues. Having well serviced, quality brake parts and using proper installation techniques will usually remedy brake noise issues. Just as a side note, residual dirt and grease from the installation itself can cause noisy brakes for a few days/weeks after first install until it is worn off and the pads break in. If you have issue beyond the first two weeks, and you have had them installed professionally, take it back and have them verify that the pads were installed properly.

Dec 10, 2015 | 2010 Dodge Journey

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Burning smell brakes


Most people do not remove the rear rotors and inspect the Emergency Brake shoes. These often peel off the metal backing on the shoe and jam inside the interior Drum of the rotor. Some people will hear a rusty grinding noise after pulling away from a stop.

These brakes have the old "star-wheel" adjusters and may need to be adjusted more loosely to remove the rotor. Its a bad system in my opinion; the drum always rusts and corrodes and the Ebrake shoes are banana peel thin. With corrosion, the drum acts like a grinder and chews up the brake shoes. Some other configurations use a mechanical link on the caliper to make the service brakes act in an Emergency. It will override a hydraulic failure, but you still need good pads on the caliper.

Mar 17, 2014 | 2000 Ford Expedition

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I have a 99" Ford Windstar LX, When I press on the brakes the pedal shakes and it makes a grinding noise after driving a few miles the abs light goes on. I have replaced, pads, rotors, master cylinder,...


if you replaced all the brake parts I would check your hub bearings and cv axels if the noise is coming from front if the noise is in the rear check your e brake shoes located inside of the rear brake rotors if u have disc rear brakes or your rear brake bearings .. hope this helps

Oct 12, 2013 | 1999 Ford Windstar

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Rear end is making a grinding noise


Most probabally the rear brakes are worn off. Take the wheels and brake drums off and check.

Jan 16, 2011 | 1988 Ford Crown Victoria

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I replaced brake shoes and brake pads, bled brakes, still have spongy brakes


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Your Masre Cylinder needs bled or its only working for front r back:

#2- To much shoe to Drum Brake Clearance

Sep 28, 2010 | 1995 Ford F250

1 Answer

How do u get the old brake pads off the back of a dodge durango 2004


NOT THIS IS FOR 4WD 5.7L
Brake Relining
  • Brake linings that are worn to within 1/32 inch (0.79 mm) of a rivet head or that have been contaminated with brake fluid, grease, or oil must be replaced.
f45-27.gif Potential brake shoe problems. Courtesy of Wagner Brake Products.
  • Failure to replace worn linings results in a scored drum. When it is necessary to replace brake shoes, they must also be replaced on the wheel on the opposite side of the vehicle. Inspect brake shoes for distortion, cracks, or looseness. If these conditions exist, the shoe must be discarded.
  • Do not let brake fluid, oil, or grease touch the brake lining.
  • If a brake lining kit is used to replace the linings, follow the instructions in the kit and install all the parts provided.
  • The two general methods of attaching the linings to the brake shoes are bonding and riveting.
  • The bonded linings are fastened with a special adhesive to the shoe, clamped in place, then cured in an oven. Instead of using an adhesive, some linings are riveted to the shoe.
  • Riveted linings allow for better heat transfer than bonded linings.
Drum Shoe and Brake Installation
  • Before installing the shoes, be sure to sand or stone the inner edge of the shoe to dress down any slight lining or metal nicks and burrs that could interfere with the sliding upon the support pads.
  • A support (backing) plate must be tight on its mount and not bent. Stone the shoe support pads brightly and dress down any burrs or grooves that could cause the shoes to bind or hang up.
  • Using an approved lubricant, lightly coat the support pads and the threads of servo star wheel adjusters. On rear axle parking brakes, lubricate any point of potential binding in the linkage and the cable. Do not lubricate nonservo brake adjusters other than to free a frozen adjuster with penetrating oil.
fr_45.30.3184.gif The areas or pads where the brake show will rub or contact the backing plate.
  • Reassemble the brakes in the reverse order of disassembly. Make sure all parts are in their proper locations and that both brake shoes are properly positioned in either end of the adjuster.
  • Also, both brake shoes should correctly engage the wheel cylinder pushrods and parking brake links.
  • They should be centered on the backing plate. Parking brake links and levers should be in place on the rear brakes.
  • With all of the parts in place, replace the brake drum.

May 22, 2010 | 2004 Dodge Durango

1 Answer

Changing the brake pads


  • Brake linings that are worn to within 1/32 inch (0.79 mm) of a rivet head or that have been contaminated with brake fluid, grease, or oil must be replaced.
f45-27.gif Potential brake shoe problems. Courtesy of Wagner Brake Products.
  • Failure to replace worn linings results in a scored drum. When it is necessary to replace brake shoes, they must also be replaced on the wheel on the opposite side of the vehicle. Inspect brake shoes for distortion, cracks, or looseness. If these conditions exist, the shoe must be discarded.
  • Do not let brake fluid, oil, or grease touch the brake lining.
  • If a brake lining kit is used to replace the linings, follow the instructions in the kit and install all the parts provided.
  • The two general methods of attaching the linings to the brake shoes are bonding and riveting.
  • The bonded linings are fastened with a special adhesive to the shoe, clamped in place, then cured in an oven. Instead of using an adhesive, some linings are riveted to the shoe.
  • Riveted linings allow for better heat transfer than bonded linings.
Drum Shoe and Brake Installation
  • Before installing the shoes, be sure to sand or stone the inner edge of the shoe to dress down any slight lining or metal nicks and burrs that could interfere with the sliding upon the support pads.
  • A support (backing) plate must be tight on its mount and not bent. Stone the shoe support pads brightly and dress down any burrs or grooves that could cause the shoes to bind or hang up.
  • Using an approved lubricant, lightly coat the support pads and the threads of servo star wheel adjusters. On rear axle parking brakes, lubricate any point of potential binding in the linkage and the cable. Do not lubricate nonservo brake adjusters other than to free a frozen adjuster with penetrating oil.
fr_45.30.3184.gif The areas or pads where the brake show will rub or contact the backing plate.
  • Reassemble the brakes in the reverse order of disassembly. Make sure all parts are in their proper locations and that both brake shoes are properly positioned in either end of the adjuster.
  • Also, both brake shoes should correctly engage the wheel cylinder pushrods and parking brake links.
  • They should be centered on the backing plate. Parking brake links and levers should be in place on the rear brakes.
  • With all of the parts in place, replace the brake drum.

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1 Answer

Brakes freeze after crossing creek. house only tenth of mile from crossing. already backed off brake shoes. this only happen of course when temp is below freezing. Well also happen on going out if you do...


Glaze on the rotors or drums will do that with cheap brake pads or shoes. Take brake cleaner and clean all parts first then see what happens. If the same problem takes on again replace the pads or shoes and get the rotors or drums remachined

Jan 01, 2010 | 2006 Ford Escape

1 Answer

When I hit the brake paddle in my ford escape for braking it makes this growling noise. What could be the problem


If you've never had the brake pads/shoes replaced, it's probably the metal backing of the pads grinding against the brake rotors -- metal on metal. You need to have the brakes checked, and if this is the case, will need to replace the pads/shoes and rotors/drums.

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2 Answers

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Take tires off then inspect rear brake shoes if okay and not down to the metal service the drums with sand paper and put them back on you might have to replace the drums and shoes!

Dec 24, 2009 | 1993 Ford Escort 4 Door

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