Question about Jeep Wrangler

13 Answers

All new brakes , front & rear , pads , calipers , rotors ,lines everything. now it pulls to the left when I apply the brakes

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  • 10 more comments 
  • case2324 Aug 09, 2008

    yes ,It has been in the shop for 3 days , we even replaced the rt frt hose & caliper bleed them 10 times , still pull left

  • case2324 Aug 09, 2008

    I did not see any wear , I will switch the slides and get back to you

  • case2324 Aug 09, 2008

    we have all new parts . we have greased the sliders & pads where the slide against the piece they ride on . still pulls left...

  • case2324 Aug 09, 2008

    wheels track OK unless you apply the brakes. It doesn't wander if you let go of the wheel....

  • case2324 Aug 09, 2008

    have removed checked greased swapped & tried all of this ...still pulling left

  • case2324 Aug 09, 2008

    I've tried all of the things you have mentioned . even switched the wheels from side to side . this is driving me a bit crazy ..something is being overlooked , but what...

  • case2324 Aug 09, 2008

    i will try to get it on an alighnment mach on monday. all new shocks were put on recently

  • case2324 Aug 09, 2008

    tires are new .shocks are new . this jeep is gagaged w/only 75,000 miles
    has not hit curbing or deep ruts. I will recheck alignment on monday...

  • case2324 Aug 11, 2008

    I replaced the steering gearbox last week ,it did n't help . going to alignment shop today..

  • case2324 Aug 12, 2008

    proplem solved , blew out the lines and preportional valve ? must have had a piece of something blocking a line...

  • case2324 Aug 13, 2008

    we fixed the problem by blowing the lines & preportional valve out w/ air compressor. must have had small blockage, they bleed fine before,but it doesn't pull now , got lucky...

  • Anonymous Mar 16, 2014

    pulled to the left when brakes are applied

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13 Answers

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You could have a clogged brake line causing the problem

Posted on Aug 13, 2008

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Brake pull is a symptom that can be easily misdiagnosed. A stuck caliper is an obvious source of this malady. And in most cases, the obvious will need replacement. But sometimes a caliper is replaced and the problem still persists.
Let's start with a few tips when diagnosing brake pull during a testdrive. Don't forget to check the simplest, most obvious thing: tire inflation pressure or mismatched tire sizes. These can cause a constant pull or one that's most noticeable during braking. Try swapping tires from side to side, as a bad tire can also cause a pull.
Keep in mind that pulls during braking can come from the front brakes, rear brakes, and sometimes, not from the brakes at all! Loose or worn steering or suspension components can also cause a pull. A pull that happens abruptly can be caused by loose suspension components. A steering wheel that changes relative positions during straight-ahead driving after braking is a tip-off that something is loose in the suspension or steering causing a drastic toe change. We'll look for specific causes after the testdrive.
Remember that a stuck caliper can cause a pull even when the brakes are not applied. Drive the car and note the severity of the pull. Stop at a safe place and really step down ******* the brake pedal. Drive again, and if the pull is worse, a stuck piston is most likely problem. Walk around the car and compare the heat emanating from each wheel. A non-contact infrared thermometer can be a big help here. If one wheel is obviously hotter, you've found a brake problem, not a suspension or steering problem.
An often-misdiagnosed cause of pull is a collapsed brake hose. The hose will look OK on the outside, but the inner liner will cause a restriction on the inside. A brake hose problem like this can take two forms. First, it can act like a restrictor in the line. Second, it can act like a check valve.
In the first case, with a restriction the car will pull to the side with the good brake hose upon initial application of the brakes, but after a second or two, the pull goes away. Because the caliper needs a relatively large volume of fluid to move the piston, the side with the collapsed hose will apply later than the one with the good hose. This is because it takes longer to get enough fluid volume into the caliper to move the brake pad against the rotor. This is why the pull can be extreme on the initial pedal application, but the pull goes away as the fluid slowly moves the piston.In the "check valve" situation, fluid will freely flow into the caliper, but will not return to the master cylinder. This can mimic a stuck piston, as the caliper will fail to fully release.

Posted on Aug 10, 2008

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Just a thought, some commercial vehicles that can be driven empty sometimes have a brake compensator that will divert brake pressure when the rear of the vehicle is not loaded.
Only a thought but does your Jeep have one? it would only take a spec of dirt in one of the lines to block one of the valves in the compensator.
The other thing have you put the Jeep on a rolling road brake tester to see if one wheel is down or up on pressure in relation to the others?
I know this is a Jeep but on some of the old Land Rovers we had to litterally hoist the front of the vehicle off the ground and bleed the brakes from back to front in order to clear an air lock in one of the pipes over the rear axle. I know yours appears to be a front brake fault but you are obviously missing something.

You gonna spit when you find it.

Posted on Aug 09, 2008

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I'd inspect the suspension and steering setup carefully - you may have an alignment problem, but you also may have something bent, such as a control arm. Another possibility is a loose tie rod end, either inner or outer. You've exhausted most of the possibilities, so I'd start looking that way now.

Posted on Aug 09, 2008

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Let's do the basic stuff first.
1) Have you checked to make sure that both front tires are inflated the same?
2) How many mile on the tires?
3) Anywhere along the line has the vehicle been "curbed"? Curbed as in, it brushed against a curb while driving (ie a turn to wide, a deep rut in the road that was hit unexpectedly, etc).
4) How long has it been since the alingment was checked?
5) How many miles on this vehicle? It could be there are parts worn.
6) When was the last time the shocks were changed? This is something most people never suspect. If a shock has gone bad, when they are put under load (like braking) they can collapse because the seals have worn out. That will cause it to pull to one side or another.

Once alignment and tires have been ruled out. Then I would look at A) bad wheel caliper. Yes even though it was replaced, doesn't mean it can't be faulty. B) It could be a faulty master. On a twin master, your braking pairs are RF & LR or LF & RR. There arer also modulating valves that can go bad (depends if you have antilock brakes.

One other test you might want to try is find a gravel or sand area.
Roll up at low speed (under 35) and mash the brakes. The gravel will allow the wheels to lock (a loose surface will "fool" the brakes for a bit), but you will be able to see a brake pattern for all the wheels. Have someone standing outside the vehicle watching. Do it a few times so they can watch a side at a time.

Posted on Aug 09, 2008

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As you said all brake system has been inspected and operate well. In such case i would first check suspension (mainly front )and wheel alighnment, castor and camber angles to be as factory specified.

Posted on Aug 09, 2008

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If this is a brake problem, it will be on the left side of the car, and with either the front or back brake. When one brake grabs a bit harder than the others, the car will go in that direction. This could also be a worn out bearing or part on the front left side. If something, let's say a wheel bearing for example, is worn and there is a slight play in it, with the new brakes grabbing better than the old, it could cause the vehicle to swing in that direction. Check the front left for any worn bearings or parts that are creating play.

Posted on Aug 09, 2008

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  • Ryan Rogers
    Ryan Rogers Aug 09, 2008

    I'm still going to lean towards something loose or worn in the front end. Could be the back, but most likely the front.

  • Ryan Rogers
    Ryan Rogers Aug 09, 2008

    Get the front end off the ground, place a bar under the tire, and lift up. If there is any up and down play, then you have a worn bearing or loose tie rod end. Also, grab the tire front and back and see if there is any side to side play.

  • Ryan Rogers
    Ryan Rogers Aug 12, 2008

    Good to hear.

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Something is blocking the brakes remove and reassemble it.

Posted on Aug 09, 2008

  • tech expert12 Aug 11, 2008

    please reply if you have checked the allignment .now what is the exact position.

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Well there is not much to say.
Like it or not, If you just did brakes and it pull to the left then either right front brakes is not braking at all or left front brakes is locking.
You need to take apart front brakes pull out pads and mount them back again.

Posted on Aug 09, 2008

  • Ginko
    Ginko Aug 09, 2008

    Air in the lines? well 99 on 100 when this happens is left brake locking and right not working, your car is not safe, that is the most important thing.

  • Ginko
    Ginko Aug 09, 2008

    And regarding wheel alignment, when is alignment car pull on one side all the time, not when you use brakes.
    Hint, do again front brakes, use a file on pads surface before installing pads, also use brakes several times, as pads need to adapt to disks.
    If you still have the problem be aware that the car is not safe, in that case get professional help.


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Wheel alignment is the problem not the brakes...

Posted on Aug 09, 2008

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Dear Sir/madam,

So if your car is pulling to the left when you apply brakes its because the left caliper is working fine but your right caliper is not doing any braking work due to the piston.

Is to take the calliper off undo the allen key bolts 7mm i think on the back of the caliper take them bolts out and grease them with copper grease next undo the other two bolts that bolt on to the hub/strut take the closest pad out and use a G Clamp put it over the back of the caliper and wind it in against the old pad still in the caliper piston wind it in as far is it will go and take that could pad out get your new pad and apply copper grease on the back metal parts of the pads and on the prongs on the back of on pad push that one into the piston part and now bolt the brake back onto the hub with the 2 bolts and then grease the outher brake pad and grease were the pad sits in the runerr top and bottom of the hammer head part of the pad then push the pad on to the brake and bolt the carrier back on over the last brake pad tighten the 7mm allen key bolt and put the metal clip back on using nose tip pliers. take it easy on the brakes for the 1st 300 miles hope this has helped.

Thanks
good luck

Posted on Aug 09, 2008

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Most pulling problems are the result of a caliper slide problem.When the pads are replaced with new,much thicker pads,the calipers are suddenly riding in a different area of the sliders.If the sliders have a wear pattern worn in them,new pads will aggravate this problem,and show up as a pull when the brakes are applied.In addition,a caliper with a piston sticking in the bore can also cause similar problems.I would,at this point,approach the customer,and recommend buying/installing a LOADED caliper setup for both sides,as loaded calipers come with pads,and calipers,and the slides..all new or remanufactured.This will definitely repair the problem,but at an added cost.Good luck.

Posted on Aug 09, 2008

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Did you blead the brakes when you got done changing them? if not than ther might be air in the lines making it when you press the brakes it applies the pressure to the left side front first and then ttoo the right....... if there is air in the lines it will grab the front drivers side first because it is the caliber closest to the brake booster.

Posted on Aug 09, 2008

  • Cameron Viseth
    Cameron Viseth Aug 09, 2008

    ok. the only things that cause it to pull to the left first is air int he lines since you replaced the brakes. you might have an air lock in the lines that just won't come out if you replaced the lines than it is possible that you have an air lock in the lines. now you said a shop replaced things for you... so they should know what to look for when bleeding the brakes. the only other thing i can think of is drive ther car and ride the brake a bit go only about 25-35mph and slightly press the brake and see if it won't wear down ther pads so it won't grab....

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How to change brake pad and check rotors


Brake Pads Removal & Installation Front for_car_toy_cam_02-04_sst_frt_dsc_asm.gif

To Remove:
  1. Drain brake fluid to ½ full level in reservoir.
  2. Remove the front wheels. toy_car_cam_frontbrakepads.gif

  3. Remove the front brake caliper assembly.
  4. Remove the 2 anti-squeal shims from each of the 2 brake pads.
  5. Remove the wear indicator from each of the 2 brake pads.
To Install:
NOTE: When replacing worn pads, the anti-squeal shims must be replaced together with the pads.
toy_car_cam_frontbrakepads.gif

  1. Using a large C clamp or equivalent press piston into the caliper.
  2. Apply disc brake grease to the inside of each anti-squeal shim.
  3. Install the anti-squeal shims on each pad.
  4. Install the pad wear indicator clip to the pads.
  5. Install the pads with the pad wear indicator plate facing upward.
  6. Install the brake caliper with the 2 mounting bolts. Torque the bolts 25 ft-lb (34 Nm).
  7. Install the front wheels.
  8. Fill the master cylinder with new clean brake fluid.
  9. Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
Rear TMC made rear brake components toy_car_cam_tmcrearbrakes.gif

TMMK made rear brake components toy_car_cam_tmmkrearbrakes.gif

To Remove:
  1. Drain the brake fluid to ½ full level in reservoir.
  2. Remove the rear wheels.
  3. Remove the caliper slide pins.
  4. Remove the caliper slide pin bushings (TMMK made) (Kentucky).
  5. Remove the rear brake calipers.
  6. Remove the 2 brake pads with the anti-squeal shims.
  7. Remove the anti-squeal shims and pad wear indicators from brake pads.
To Install:
  1. Using a large C clamp or equivalent press the piston into the caliper.
  2. Coat both sides of the outer anti-squeal shim with pad grease.
  3. Install anti-squeal shims to each pad.
  4. Install wear indicators on the 2 brake pads.
  5. Install the caliper slide pin bushings (TMMK made) (Kentucky).
  6. Install the rear brake caliper with the slide pins. Torque the slide pins as follows:
    • TMC made (Japan): Torque the caliper slide pin 25 ft-lb (34.3 Nm)
    • TMMK made (Kentucky): Torque the caliper slide pin 34 ft-lb (47 Nm)
  7. Fill the master cylinder with new clean brake fluid.
  8. Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
  9. Install the rear wheels.
prev.gif next.gif Brake Rotor Removal & Installation Front To Remove:
  1. Remove the front wheels.
  2. Remove the front brake caliper assembly.
  3. Remove the front brake pads.
  4. Remove the 2 bolts and caliper mounting bracket.
  5. Place match marks on the disc and axle hub.
  6. Remove the front wheel disc.
To Install:
  1. Align the match marks and install the front disc.
  2. Install the brake caliper mounting bracket. Torque the bolts 79 ft-lb (107 Nm).
  3. Install the brake caliper. Torque the bolts 25 ft-lb (34 Nm).
  4. Install new gaskets and connect the brake hose to the caliper with the banjo fitting bolt. Torque the fitting bolt 22 ft-lb (29.4 Nm).
  5. Fill the reservoir with brake fluid.
  6. Bleed the brake system.
  7. Install the front wheel.
Rear To Remove:
  1. Remove the rear wheels.
  2. Remove the brake caliper assembly.
  3. Remove the brake pads.
  4. Remove the 2 bolts and the caliper mounting bracket.
  5. Place match marks on the disc and axle hub.
  6. Remove the rear disc.
To Install:
  1. Align the match marks and install the rear disc.
  2. Install the rear brake caliper mounting bracket. Torque the bracket bolts as follows:
    • TMC made (Japan): Torque the bracket bolt 46 ft-lb (61.8 Nm)
    • TMMK made (Kentucky): Torque the bracket bolt 34 ft-lb (47 Nm)
  3. Install the rear brake caliper with the slide pins. Torque the slide pins as follows:
    • TMC made (Japan): Torque the caliper slide pin 25 ft-lb (34.3 Nm)
    • TMMK made (Kentucky): Torque the caliper slide pin 32 ft-lb (43 Nm)
  4. Install new gaskets and connect the brake hose to the caliper with the banjo fitting bolt. Torque the fitting bolt 22 ft-lb (29.4 Nm).
  5. Fill the reservoir with brake fluid.
  6. Bleed the brake system.
  7. Install the rear wheel
prev.gif next.gif

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1 Answer

What tools needed to replace front brake pads & rotors


Brake Pads
Removal & Installation
Front





3.4L front disc brake assembly
toy_4run_34_frontbrakeassembly.gif








4.0L and 4.7L front disc brake assembly
toy_4run_frontbrakeassembly.gif



To Remove:


  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of
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  2. Remove or disconnect the following:

    • Front wheel
    • Clip, 2 caliper pins, the anti-rattle spring then remove the 2 brake pads
      and the 4 anti-squeal shims

To Install:

CAUTION
Only replace brake pads on 1 side of the
vehicle at a time. Failure to use this procedure could cause the caliper pistons
on the opposite side of the vehicle to pop out requiring the reconditioning or
replacement of the brake caliper.


  1. Remove a small amount of brake fluid from the master cylinder.
  2. Install a used brake pad into the caliper and compress the caliper pistons.
  3. Apply disc brake grease to both sides of the inner anti-squeal shims.
  4. Install or connect the following:

    • Anti-squeal shims to the new brake pads
      NOTE: When replacing worn pads, the anti-squeal shims must be replaced
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    • 2 brake pads
    • Anti-rattle spring and the 2 caliper pins
    • Clip
    • Front wheel

  5. Depress the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
  6. Check the brake fluid level and top off as needed.

Rear
To Remove:


  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of
    this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:

    • Rear wheel






      toy_4run_rearcalbolts.gif



    • 2 cylinder slide pins from rear caliper assembly
    • Caliper assembly from rear caliper mounting
    • 2 brake pads with anti-squeal shims from rear caliper mounting
    • 2 anti-squeal shims from each disc brake pads
    • Pad wear indicator plate from the inner side disc brake pad
    • 4 pad support plates from the rear caliper mounting

To Install:


  1. Install or connect the following:

    • 4 pad support plates on the rear caliper mounting
    • Pad wear indicator plate on the inside brake pad
      Note: Install the pad wear indicator facing downward.

    • Anti-squeal shims on each brake pad
    • 2 disc brake pads with anti-squeal shims to the caliper assembly

  2. Apply lithium soap base glycol grease to the sliding part of 2 caliper slide
    pins.
  3. Install or connect the following:

    • Disc brake caliper assembly with 2 caliper slide pins
    • Torque to 65 ft-lbs (88 Nm)
    • Rear wheel

  4. Depress the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
  5. Check the brake fluid level and top off as needed.
--- Removal & Installation
Front
To Remove:


  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of
    this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:

    • Front wheel
    • Front brake caliper assembly

  3. Make matchmarks on the disc and the axle hub.
  4. Remove the front disc.

To Install:


  1. Align matchmarks and disc onto axle hub.
  2. Install or connect the following:

    • Front brake caliper assembly with the 2 bolts

      1. Torque to 90 ft-lbs (123 Nm)

    • Front wheel

Sep 23, 2010 | 2003 Toyota 4Runner

1 Answer

Brake pedal is hard, pulls to driver side


May have a leaking right front caliper thats not applying evenly with the left.Look at the front wheels for excess brake dust.The left wheel should have more dust then the right.Also front left rotor may be pitted causing more friction and excess grabbing on the left.Any brake shop will pull the wheel off and inspect the rotor for free.Dont let them try to sell you two rotors or calipers if only one is bad.Replacing both right and left brake pads is OK

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1 Answer

Popping on left front when applying brakes (ABS).


Is your ABS light on? If so, you have a bad wheel speed sensor at the LF wheel. Or, you may have rust buildup on the teeth that the speed sensor measures. Pull off the axle, and check the toothed gear that resided in the spindle.

If not, you may havea sticking caliper piston, or inadequate lubrication on the caliper slides.

Sep 05, 2009 | 1998 Toyota Camry

1 Answer

Need help changing the front rotors on my chevy 3500 4x4 dually


Have to pull the front wheels, next back out the two caliper bolts (Allen head), next slide the caliper out of it's seat and set up on the spindle, careful not to damage the flex brake line. This will now free the rotor to come off the spindle. This is also a good time to check/replace brake pads. Chances are if your changing rotors, due to brake damage, warped or other, the pads need changed. This is simply done by sliding the old pads out and placing a C clamp over the piston to back it into the caliper housing to allow room to install new pads. Apply a little antisieze lub behind the pad between the piston and also anywhere the new pad bears. Install the caliper in reverse order and put the wheels back on. Remember to test the brakes before hitting the road, The new pads will have to be pushed out by applying brakes a few times. Then you should be good to go.
Hope this helps.

Apr 16, 2009 | 2000 Chevrolet 3500

3 Answers

How to replace brake pads and rotors


It is pretty straight forward. The Ranger has front disc brakes.
If possible spray everything with brake cleaner to reduce asbestos dust as you work on the brakes. Best not to breathe in any of the nasty debris on the brakes and caliper. If I have them I wear nitril gloves for less mess on the hands.
Take the wheel off. The caliper holds the brake pads. On mine it is a large allen bolt at the inside of the caliper to take it off. You don't have to remove both allen bolts--take off one and then loosen the other. THer caliper can then be rotated off the rotor. Now you can remove the rotor--it may have a screw holding it on still--remove that and pull it off the wheel hub.(Sometimes they can be stuck on, but they pretty much are just hanging onto the wheel hub studs) Do one at a time and then if you have any issues, look at the other one. The brake pads themselves kind of snap into place in the caliper. Remove the old ones noting any orientation issues and any shims--some of them come with thin plate shims that fit behind them. When you are ready to replace the pads, you need to use a clamp to drive the caliper piston back so that the pads on the cliper will fit onto the new rotor when they are rotated back. Make sure the bolts on the caliper are tight.
There rear are less essential since most of the stopping is from the front--let me know if this helps to push my rating up.

Mar 27, 2009 | 1999 Ford Ranger SuperCab

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