Question about 1990 Ford Escort

3 Answers

Engine won't start

Engine turns over but no spark. I replaced the ignition coil, the stator, the ignition module and the distributor cap and rotor. I get the correct electrical measurements using the ohm meter, and voltage.there is no power at the tach terminal on the coil. where might be a new place or idea to look for.

Posted by on

  • rachaelrose Dec 18, 2008

    I have same prob, put in all the stuff M_fud said and still no spark, also all tests of ohm measurements were correct. Don't think timing belt is broken because valves still move up and down.
    any help would be great.


×

3 Answers

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

  • Contributor
  • 4 Answers

Try the pick up coil inside the distributor

Posted on Dec 27, 2008

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

  • Contributor
  • 4 Answers

I just fixed that same problem it was the ECM,(The computer) purchased one from Kragens
for just under $130.00 (+$70.00 core charge) and now runs fine.

Posted on Nov 20, 2008

Check your timing belt. It's broke!!!

Posted on Sep 09, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

I replaced starter on 1989 f150 5.0 now have no spark


Mike, Check for diagnostic codes. Check fuses/relays,wires/plugs for pinched,damage or corrosion. Could be a lot of things like distributor armature, cap, rotor, stator, ICM, coil,spark plugs,wires, make sure ground is good to distributor. Use the attached forum links,instruction, guides to help diagnose ignition spark problems, Good luck
"I hope this helped you out, if so let me know by pressing the helpful button. Check out some of my other posts if you need more tips and info."
No spark replaced all ignition parts 1990 F150 Ford F150 Forum Community...
Engine Spins but No Start No Spark
Engine Won Start No Spark
Code Reader 80 96 Ford Bronco
Resolved 89 Ford F150 302 Won Start HELP

Jun 24, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 81 f250 351 winsor isnt getting spark ignition module ,coil ,distributor,cap and rotor,plugs and wires all new i gapped plugs at .044 help


got +12v to the ign coil? does the coil spark if you ground the negative(-) terminal? does the distributor rotor rotate? it may be time to replace the distributor sproket and module (stator and armature). http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/Ovalex/2010-12-11_153049_duraspark_stator_exploded_view.gif

Apr 16, 2015 | Ford F-250 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to remove the pick-up coil from the distributor. 1989 GMC 1500 4X4


The distributor does have to be removed and dis-assembled in order to replace the ignition pick-up coil/stator, and if the pick-up coil/stator is faulty then the distributor should be replaced because the distributor will come with a new pick-up coil/stator and the old distributor will have to be removed anyway and in the long run it will actually save money from not having to pay a mechanic to remove and dis-assemble the distributor to replace the pick-up coil/stator, however most of the time it is the ignition module inside of the distributor that is faulty.




When the engine is at TDC (Top Dead Center) is the ignition rotor pointing to the #1 position on the distributor housing as described below?



The engine should be set on TDC (Top Dead Center) with the distributor cap removed, and there is a mark or notch on the distributor housing that the rotor should be pointing to when the engine is on top dead center. (Look under the distributor cap and find where the number one terminal runs under the distributor cap, and where that position on the distributor cap corresponds with the distributor housing, and it should match up to a mark or a notch on the distributor housing)

This static timing is all that matters and the computer will be able to control the timing as long as the ignition rotor is in that position when the engine is at top dead center.



If the engine is at TDC and the ignition rotor does not point to the #1 mark on the distributor housing, then loosen the hold down bolt to the distributor and turn the distributor until the rotor is pointing to the #1 mark on the distributor and then tighten the distributor hold down bolt.


6_24_2012_9_32_16_pm.jpg

Jun 24, 2012 | GMC K1500 Cars & Trucks

5 Answers

Truck wont crank. we have put new distributor cap, rotor button, coil pack, plugs, wires, and fuel pump. we also checked our firing order.


you said you repl dist cap that means you don't have a crank sensor you have electronic ing module. remove your elec ing module have it tested most auto parts stores could test your module, or check your coil at the neg terminal. should have power. if not you lost your primary volt from your batt.your secondary power is coming from your electronic ing module from the module to the pos terminal on the coil, when the eng cranks,from the coil to the dist cap , from the dist cap center to the rotor then out to the plugs,this all happen pervided the timing belt or timing chain is ok. the cumbustion chainber needs 3 things , thats fuel, air, and spark.

Apr 17, 2011 | 1996 Chevrolet K1500

1 Answer

My 2003 gmc v6 just had its plugs and wires and distributor cap and button changed and i put the distributor button on wrong, it ran fine 4 a mon. or 2 and one of the screws came out of the button and...


The distributor cap and/or the ignition rotor most likely have a crack somewhere and the distributor cap should be replaced along with the ignition rotor. The ignition module could have been damaged as well as the ignition pick-up coil/stator and if replacing the distributor cap and ignition rotor does not solve the problem then the ignition module or the pick-up coil/stator assembly inside of the distributor is also most likely damaged and the distributor will need to be replaced. There is a certain procedure for removing and replacing the distributor, and the ignition timing is not adjustable and it is not set using a timing light or with the engine running, and if you do have to replace the distributor Let me know if you require the procedure to properly remove and replace the distributor or if you require any further assistance.

Aug 17, 2010 | 2003 GMC Sierra 1500

1 Answer

1999 silverado 4.3 cranks but no start can hear fuel pump, swaped out coil and crank sensor w/ known good parts no change, engine did start once after coil was changed ran rough and stalled and wont...


First check to see if full battery voltage is even getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

To replace the distributor follow this procedure;

The ignition timing is not adjusted with a timing light or with the engine running, and to set the ignition timing follow these procedures.

There is a mark or notch on the distributor housing that the rotor should be pointing to when the engine is on top dead center. This "static" timing is all that matters and the computer will be able to control the timing as long as the ignition rotor is in that position when the engine is at top dead center.

Removal;

1. With the engine at top dead center.

2. Look under the distributor cap and find where the number one terminal runs under the distributor cap, and where that position on the distributor cap corresponds with the distributor housing, and it should match up to a mark or a notch on the distributor housing indicating the number one position.

3. With the engine on top dead center the ignition rotor should be pointing to the number one mark or notch that is on the distributor housing, Then make a reference mark of the position that the ignition rotor is pointing to (out on the engine or firewall) and the more precise you mark the position, the easier the installation of the new distributor will be. This will be reference mark #1.

4. Remove the distributor lock down bolt, (the lock down clamp will most likely be attached to the distributor and if so it should not be removed from the distributor) then slowly lift up on the distributor about three inches and note the direction that the ignition rotor turns, and when the ignition rotor stops turning then mark the position that the ignition rotor is pointing to (out on the engine or firewall) and then lift the distributor striaght up and out, and remove the gasket or any left over gasket material from the intake manifold. The more precise you mark the position the easier it will be to install the new distributor and an assistant might be helpful. This will be reference mark #2

Once the distributor has been removed it is important that the engine does not get cranked over by the starter or the crankshaft turned at all, or the reference marks will become useless.

Installation;

Be sure that the new distributor is complete with a new module and that there is a new gasket in place on the distributor.

1. Lower the distributor with gasket down into the distrbutor well and align the ignition rotor with the #2 reference mark and when the distributor gear engages the drive gear on the camshaft then the ignition rotor should turn to the #1 reference mark as the distributor sets all the way back down flush on the intake manifold.

2. Install and tighten the lock down bolt, and If the distributor is properly installed then the ignition rotor should be pointing to the #1 reference mark and the #1 position on the distributor housing with the engine on top dead center.

Replace the distributor cap and connect the spark plug wires, and see if the engine will start, if the engine does start and the check engine light does not come on (assuming that it was not on before) then the distributor is properly installed and there is no further timing requirements.

Let me know if you require any further assistance.



a4e111e.jpg

71a37c7.jpg

91bcf9e.jpg

Jul 31, 2010 | 1999 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

1 Answer

1979 chevy van not getting spark.was running fine day before.turns over fine,getting fuel.could it be the module


First thing is what condition are the distributor cap, ignition rotor, and spark plug wires in?

There is the possibility that the ignition coil located in the top of the distributor cap is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is even getting to the "Bat" or "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position. Then check the secondary resistance to the ignition coil.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil. A faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require any further assistance.


b0c4aa0.jpg

Jul 29, 2010 | 1979 Chevrolet C/K 3500

1 Answer

Have replaced Fuel pump on frame, fuel filter, Distributor cap and rotor and ignition control module. Engine still cuts off after awhile. when it cools it will run for awhile in 2nd gear, if I shift to 3rd...


Check under the distributor cap and look at the connector where the ignition module connects to the pick-up coil/stator, and if it is dark or burnt looking then replace the pick-up coil/stator or the entire distributor. Here is an image of the ignition pick-up coil/stator and you will notice the white connector, and when that connector becomes dark or burnt looking then the pick-up coil/stator is faulty.


d3efb0f.jpg

Jun 14, 2010 | 1989 Ford F 150

1 Answer

Have a 1989 f250 that will turn over when turning the key but wont fire, we can't any spark from the plugs. we've checked all the fuses and relays and can't figure out why it wont start.


It sounds like the TFI Module may be defective, this is the heart of the ignition system, it is a black or grey module with about 6 wires plugged into it on the side of the distributor (it may also be mounted on a finned heat sink on the inside of the left front fender), In rare cases it is the another ignition componet like the ignition coil or distributor stator, make sure you check the coil wire and the distributor for any signs or of being damaged (dist cap and coil lead need to be replaced), white powder on ther coil or distributor terminals is the give away of damage.

Also perform the following test, check with a 12 volt test light: On the coil primary ( connector at coil) there are two wires, one is red. Make sure you have voltage at this wire with the key on, then probe the other wire, usually green, crank the engine and this circuit should blink. If it doesn't, make sure the distributor turns, if it does then replace the ignition module and the stator inside the distributor.

I recommend you use Motorcraft or Ford parts. The aftermarket modules can be a problem as far as reliability. If the distributor rotor doesn't turn when you crank the engine, then you may have a timing gear problem

Jul 25, 2008 | Ford F-250 Cars & Trucks

Not finding what you are looking for?
1990 Ford Escort Logo

79 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Ford Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

60792 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

21949 Answers

Fordexpert

Level 3 Expert

5331 Answers

Are you a Ford Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...