Question about Jaguar XJ6

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Thick blue smoke. no oil leaks new spark plugs and spark plug wires. checked all cylenders cant figure out why its smoking.

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Hi! Chris, There are many causes of oil burning or exhaust smoke. There are three different causes of normal oil burning, 1; worn valve guides (smoking during deceleration), 2; worn cylinders and piston rings (smoking during acceleration), 3; split or worn out valve seal, or damaged intake manifold gasket (smoking all the time). Of course there are several variables in this equation. Sometimes coolant can also get into a cylinder and cause a blueish smoke. If you remove the spark plugs and use a pressure pump on the coolant system (radiator), coolant should leak into the intake manifold or cylinder. Coolant leaking into the intake manifold will leak into several cylinder through the valves. So, what year and how many miles are on the Jaguar?

Posted on Aug 09, 2008

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Dodge ram engine smokes when stated and skips


What color smoke? Black is emissions related, blue/black your burning oil and white your burning anti-freeze. With the "skip" your REF to, you probably have a bad spark plug, wire, or bad cylinder and burning some oil or coolant. CK plugs , wires & do a compression test. Pressure test Radiator for head gasket leak.

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Your issue could be a few things. Simplest first would be the PVC valve. Other issue would be valve seals, valve guides or piton rings. The blue smoke is from your vehicle burning oil

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The thick white smoke is either burnt oil or steam you can easily identify the smell of burnt oil not really sure why you thought it would be a good idea to put a 2 stroke mixed fuel in but more than likely that alone fouled your spark plugs. But if the problem preceded the fuel blunder then your either have a bad intake/head gasket, leaking valve seats, or bad main engine seal. Replace the spark plugs and check cylinder compression. Change your engine oil and check to see if it contains water/coolant also watch for coolant or oil consumption

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There are several causes for this, including the above.
Check the spark plugs and coils/wires. Lose or worn parts can cause this. If the spark plugs have thick black residue, you have an oil leak. A flat black powdery residue is too much air. A thick crusty white/yellowish residue would be a coolant leak.
If it is blowing blue or white smoke when running, the you have an oil (blue) coolant (white) leak that needs to be fixed. Normal smoke is grayish in color.
Check all the vacuum lines as a leak may be the problem.

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1989 Doge Ram, 3.9v6. Smoking from exhaust pipe when you crank it until you shut it down it also randomly backfires. Changed manifold gaskets, timing chain, and can't figure out where this is coming...


SEE WHITE SMOKE YOU HAVE BLOWN HEAD GASKET OR INTAKE MANIFOLD GASKET LEAKING.IF YOU SEE BLUE SMOKE ENGINE BURNING OIL DUE TO WORN VALVE GUIDES AND WORN VALVE SEALS AND WORN PISTON RINGS. CHECK SPARK PLUGS IF THEY OIL SOAKED ENGINE BURNING OIL.

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1 Answer

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oil leaks are hard to identify by the blue smoke that you used to see. most of this smoke is burned up by the catalytic converter. at least until all of that oil plugs the converter up. you can tell if your burning oil by removing the spark plugs, and checking their appearance against diagnostic charts redily available on the internet. oil burning will leave a distinctive residue.

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1 Answer

CHUCKS OUT CLOUDS OF BLUE SMOKE.


Blue Smoke: Blue smoke is caused by engine oil entering the cylinder area and being burned along with the fuel air mixture. As with the white smoke, just a small drop of oil leaking into the cylinder can produce blue smoke out the tailpipe. Blue smoke is more likely in older or higher mileage vehicles than newer cars with fewer miles.

How did the engine oil get inside the cylinder in the first place? The car has many seals, gaskets, and O-rings that are designed to keep the engine oil from entering the cylinder, and one of them has failed. If too much oil leaks into the cylinder and fouls the spark plug, it will cause a misfire (engine miss) in that cylinder, and the spark plug will have to be replaced or cleaned of the oil. Using thicker weight engine oil or an oil additive designed to reduce oil leaks might help reduce the amount of oil leaking into the cylinder.

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SOUND LIKE TOO MUCH OIL GETTING IN COMBUSTION CHAMBER. POSSIBLE CAUSES.TOO MUCH OIL IN CRANK CASE.STUCK CLOSED PVC VALVE.WORN VALVE GUIDES AND VALVE SEALS ALSO BAD OIL CONTROL RINGS.

May 12, 2010 | 2002 Land Rover Freelander

1 Answer

Blue smoke


Blue smoke is never a good thing....

Blue smoke is caused by engine oil entering the cylinder area and being burned along with the fuel air mixture. As with the white smoke, just a small drop of oil leaking into the cylinder can produce blue smoke out the tailpipe. Blue smoke is more likely in older or higher mileage vehicles than newer cars with fewer miles.
How did the engine oil get inside the cylinder in the first place? The car has many seals, gaskets, and O-rings that are designed to keep the engine oil from entering the cylinder, and one of them has failed. If too much oil leaks into the cylinder and fouls the spark plug, it will cause a misfire (engine miss) in that cylinder, and the spark plug will have to be replaced or cleaned of the oil. Using thicker weight engine oil or an oil additive designed to reduce oil leaks might help reduce the amount of oil leaking into the cylinder.

your engine has worn valve guides, piston rings An engine that burns a lot of oil (more than a quart in 500 miles) is an engine that needs to be overhauled. Normal oil consumption should be a quart or less in 1500 miles. Most newer engines consume less than half a quart of oil between oil changes (every 3000 miles). So if your engine is burning oil, it's essentially worn out and needs to be repaired.
Because the cost of overhauling or replacing an engine often exceeds the value of an older car or truck, many people will just keep on driving a "mosquito fogger" in spite of the blue clouds of smoke it leaves behind. Never mind the pollution it causes, oil is cheaper than a new or rebuilt engine they reason. That philosophy may be okay if you live out in the sticks somewhere. But in urban areas that require periodic vehicle emissions testing, an engine that's burning oil usually won't pass the test because of excessive hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. You may get by on a waiver after you've spent some money (in vain) on a tune-up, but the fact remains you're still a polluter.
An engine that burns a lot of oil will also eventually foul the spark plugs. Thick, black oily deposits build up on the plugs until they cease to fire. Then the engine misfires and loses power. Cleaning or changing the plugs may temporarily solve the problem, but sooner or later they'll foul out again.
Forget about "miracle" oil additives or pills that claim to stop oil burning. They don't. Better to save your money and put it towards a valve job and new set of rings.

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1 Answer

I have a 96 eclipse 2.0 with 150 thousand miles there is blue smoke coming out of the tail pipe smells like chemicals.


Blue Smoke: Blue smoke is caused by engine oil entering the cylinder area and being burned along with the fuel air mixture. As with the white smoke, just a small drop of oil leaking into the cylinder can produce blue smoke out the tailpipe. Blue smoke is more likely in older or higher mileage vehicles than newer cars with fewer miles.
How did the engine oil get inside the cylinder in the first place? The car has many seals, gaskets, and O-rings that are designed to keep the engine oil from entering the cylinder, and one of them has failed. If too much oil leaks into the cylinder and fouls the spark plug, it will cause a misfire (engine miss) in that cylinder, and the spark plug will have to be replaced or cleaned of the oil. Using thicker weight engine oil or an oil additive designed to reduce oil leaks might help reduce the amount of oil leaking into the cylinder. I that doesn't work then i would get with a mechanic and have it leak tested for possible piston ring replacement.

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