Question about 2001 Chrysler Voyager

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Chrysler Voyager 2001 rear brake system

New pads were fitted to the rear during a routine dealer service at 114000 miles. Rear brakes now lock on and vehicle driven in this condition for 20 miles. Much smoke and disks now blue. Was Ok with old pads. What part(s) might be faulty and what consequential damage may have been done while driving? Did the shop carry out the correct replacement procedure?

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Your brake caliper could have had froze up.

Posted on Oct 08, 2008

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Right rear wheel will not turn 2004 xl7 susuki


This car ABS, if yes, try posting that, as i will answer for NO.
NO = short and easy. ABS = hard. (read the FSM , and see)
find a real shop with the ASE sigh,
never go there again. your dealer, he is bad for your health and others.
yes, my same bearing failed on my 04 but i found it with an electronic stethoscope (sonic ear) in 5min and did it early before brake damage.
locking brakes are very very bad , you need to find this fast.
he sounds incompetent.
if the Right rear is locked, the mech, loosens the bleed fitting
if it unlocks the MC is failing,(non ABS). mine is non ABS too.
if a new mc is installed and the rear piston clearance is not set
the MC will LOCK THE WHOLE SYSTEM up. or 1 end.
if the brake didnt release above, that means (gee simple) the brake neat
is locked. (bad bearing or wet soaked brakes or the parts assembled
ALL WRONG here.
puddle on floor, is it DOT3/4 fluid or GL4 gear lube.
surly you can tell the diffr, between them.> no?
if fuild that is wheel cylinder failure.
did you use non DOT/3/4 fluid, you must not use dot 5 or the seals will fail FAST,.....
using jiffyboobs? dont/

Feb 25, 2013 | 2002 Suzuki XL-7

1 Answer

Do the back brakes have a drum pad as well as brake pads


depends on the system you have, Most newer cars have disc brakes on the front, and the rear brakes vary , some have drum brakes and some disc on the rear as well as the front , both versions use a PAD, drum brakes usually refer to them as brake shoes, and disc's refer to them as disc pads

Jul 18, 2011 | 2000 Chrysler Grand Voyager

1 Answer

My mechanic tells me I need rear brake pads and rotors as a cost of $ 320.00. I have 60000 miles on the car. I can't believe I need brakes so soon with low mileage.


The way in which a car has driven has a very direct impact on how long brake pads will last before they have to be replaced. For example, if you spend most of your time driving long distances on the highway, you're using your brakes much less often than in stop and go urban driving. I have seen cars that need brake jobs every 75,000 miles; I've seen similar cars, with different drivers and different driving routines, go 25,000 miles between brake jobs.

I would not be surprised at all if the front brake pads (and possibly rotors) of your Accord needed to be replaced at 60k miles of typical mixed driving. I am, however, somewhat surprised that your rear brakes need service at this point. The front brakes of a car typically provide much more of a car's stopping power than the rear brakes (it's a physics thing), and so they generally wear much more quickly than the rear brakes. All that said, I recently had to replace the rear brake pads and rotors of a 2002 Passat that had only 51,000 miles on the odometer. This car's pads were worn down to the metal, and one of the rotors was badly scored. Upon speaking with the owner of the car, though, things made slightly more sense. First, the car was equipped with a very active ABS braking system, which decreases front wheel braking and increases rear wheel braking depending on road conditions. As a result, the rear brakes of that car were used much more heavily than in the "average" car. Second, and more obviously, the owner admitted to forgetting to release her parking brake several times before driving off, sometimes going several miles before realizing her mistake. The emergency brake system on most cars engages the rear brakes, and driving off with those brakes still on will put a huge amount of wear on those pads in a very short distance.

One final, distant, thought is that it's possible that your rear calipers have gotten "sticky" and are not fully releasing after they have been engaged. Accumulated moisture on the brake pistons and piston channel walls can leave rust spots that hang up piston travel, leading to this condition. At the same time, it would be unusual for both brakes on the same axle to develop this problem at the same time--this typically happens one brake caliper at a time, and you notice the condition when you car begins pulling to one side when you brake or even after you release your brakes.

May 19, 2011 | 2003 Honda Accord

1 Answer

Replace rear brake pads


Rear disc brake pads offer better performance and are not as affected by moisture like conventional brake shoe style brakes are. Rear disc brakes are similar to front disc brakes. The main difference is that rear disc brake systems must incorporate the emergency brake system. There are two methods widely used for the emergency brake with rear disc systems. The first system is a brake shoe inside the brake disc that is actuated by the emergency brake lever. The second is a screw style actuator inside the brake caliper. When activated the brake pads are forced into the brake disc and held tightly by the emergency brake lever.
READ COMPLETELY BEFORE STARTING
Step 1 - Identify Rear Disc Brake Components
rear_brake_pads.jpg Rear disc brake assembly includes; rear brake disc, rear brake pads, brake caliper mount and a caliper mounting screw. (Note: Some vehicles do not have the rotor mounting screw.)
Step 2 - Removing the Rear Brake Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_2.jpg To replace rear brake pads and rotors the rear brake caliper needs to be removed. First loosen the rear brake caliper mount bolts and remove them. Turn counter clockwise.
Step 3 - Lift Rear Brake Caliper from The Caliper Mount
rear_brake_pads_3.jpg After the caliper mount bolts have been removed, gently lift the brake caliper from the caliper mount. Inspect the caliper slides; they should move freely in the caliper mount. Remove rear brake pads and hardware.

Step 4 - Removing Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_4.jpg With a socket wrench or other appropriate removal tool, loosen the rear brake caliper mounting bolts. Remove bolts and lift the caliper mount and remove it from the vehicle. Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole. Tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub holding on tightly, using both hands. You do not want to drop the rotor.

Step 5 - Removing Rear Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor.jpg Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole, tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub, hold on using both hands and do not drop.

Step 6 - Install New Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor_2.jpg Check the new rotor against the old brake rotor to make sure they are the same size. Clean the mating surface on the wheel hub before the new brake rotor is installed. Reinstall rotor retainer screw.
Step 7 - Reset Rear Brake Caliper
rear_brakes_7.jpg Before new brake pads can be installed, the rear brake caliper must be reset. The reset tool winds the piston back into position so the new brake pads will fit. This style of brake caliper will not compress with a clamp tool; it can only be reset with the proper reset tool.
Step 8 - Reinstall Rear Caliper Mount and Install New Rear Brake Pads
rear_brake_rotor_3.jpg After the caliper has been reset, reinstall caliper mounting bolts and make sure the bolts are tight. Then match up the old brake pads to the new brake pads. They should be exactly the same except, of course; the old ones will be worn out. Check the new brake pads for proper fit and install any brake hardware that is required.
Step 9 - Remount Rear Brake Caliper
rear_brake_rotor_4.jpg Reinstall the brake caliper, align brake pad hardware and reinstall caliper mounting bolts. (Note: align the rear peg of the brake pad to the groove in the caliper piston.) Recheck and retighten all caliper and caliper mount bolts. Bleed brake system to relieve any air in the system. Before driving the vehicle, push the brake pedal down and let it up slowly. This operation forces the brake pads to travel to the brake rotors. DO NOT DRIVE VEHICLE until proper brake pedal operation resumes. When test driving vehicle listen for any unusual noises during the operation of the brakes.
WARNING! Always have the vehicle under inspection on level ground, in park with the emergency brake on. Always wear protective eyewear, gloves and necessary clothing before inspection or work begins. Never crank an engine over when anyone is near the battery or engine. Always have an operational fire extinguisher close by, obey all first aid instructions in the event of an injury. Never stand in front or behind a vehicle when cranked over or running. When engine is cranked over keep hands and clothing away from rotating components. Never move a car without proper brake pedal operation.

Jun 01, 2010 | 1995 Saab 900

2 Answers

My 2001 Chrysler Voyager shifts into neutral while driving


I doubt you going to get a code from the transmission. Im surprised that shop you have it taken to cant tell you what is the problems. If you have high miles as 100k chances are the tranny is worned and need service or replacing. Transmission rearly grind or make a grinding noise, the brakes will make the grinding noise due to the worned pad as metal rubbing on metal, have all breaks check. If the van is 5speed, yes I can see the tranny will make a grinding noise VS automatic transmission. I would take it to another shop and get another opinion or take it to the dealer which they usually charge 70-75 buck to have it diagnose. If tranny need replacing check ebay to junk yard, is lot cheaper and as good than having it rebuilt.

Nov 23, 2009 | 2001 Chrysler Voyager

1 Answer

I am trying to remove the rear brake caliper on chrysler voyager but struggling. How do I do this


Not sure of the brake, after removing all bolts and or retaining clips you can slowly pry the old pads apart using tire iron or large screw driver. this will compress the brake cylinder and allow for easy replacement of new pads. With this method you should not have to bleed the brakes after replacing pads.

Oct 22, 2009 | 2004 Chrysler Voyager

2 Answers

1999 Chevy Tahoe- Soft Brake Pedal


Try having the dealer flush and bleed your system. It is very hard to bleed ABS systems yourself and have safe brakes that still work afterward. Bleeding non-ABS brakes yourself is easy not the same for ABS brakes. Valving, sensors and what-not require a tech and the correct equipment in my opinion. You do it wrong and you could ruin your ABS system. Do that and see if they firm up. I replaced my brake shoes/pads at the same time all new everything in back, drums/springs everything and new rotors up front. then I had the chevy dealer flush, refill and bleed system. Stiffer pedal and brakes work better. Keep in mind the brakes on 99 Tahoes are inaedequate, require new rotors often, heat up and fade/glaze pads regularly. I replace my pads long before they wear down because they glaze up and start fading early. I'll rough em up once maybe, next time, new ones. Every two brake jobs, new rotors for me. Just how it is. They will stiffen a bit and work better but they will never be awesome brakes. Just how it is on 99 and earlier Tahoes. Hope it helps. Very important to bleed correctly though. I'll bleed my 83 Toyota 4x4 myself but not the Tahoe.

Aug 06, 2009 | 1999 Chevrolet Tahoe

1 Answer

Chrysler Voyager 2001 rear brake system


Take it back to the dealer who fixed it.
Driving with the rear brakes locked may have warped the rotors. Blue color is from excessive heat. Sounds like a preportioning valve in the brake system is faulty.
The dealer didn't do his job very well. Find another dealer.

Jun 01, 2009 | 2001 Chrysler Voyager

1 Answer

Rear brakes chrysler voyager 05/01


There should only be two bolts on the back of the caliper holding it into the knuckle. Removing those two bolts should free the caliper. In fact I believe they're 12 or 13 millimeter bolts.

May 16, 2008 | 2001 Chrysler Voyager

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