Question about Mitsubishi Eclipse

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I have a turbocharged 4 cylinder eclipse and it keeps stalling out when i get out of gear. On top of that the turbo gauge maxes out in 5th gear so I can't go above 50. I was wondering if the turbo is messed up or is it something else?

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It sounds like the waste gate isn't working properly. Try checking any relays and pressure switches that are involved because I don't think you have a mechanical dump system.
Its dirty work so gear up and don't panic if you snap a bolt removing a turbo thats been cooked on for god knows how long is always a daunting task.

Posted on Aug 07, 2008

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I have just had air mass sensor fitted, swirl pipes removed,and intake manifold de-coked, 250 miles later tubo has failed i e,blades come loose, is there a connection


The cause of damage There are several main causes of turbocharger damage:
Find your cause by checking what was your Turbo's condition.

Oil/lubrication

To work effectively, a turbo needs a constant flow of clean oil, and to keep your turbo in top condition, you need to ensure that you change the oil and oil filter regularly.
This helps to prevent the build up of carbon deposits and contaminants that can cause abrasive damage to the inside of your turbocharger, reducing its efficiency and causing irreparable damage over time. Fully synthetic oil produces the least amount of carbon.

Foreign objects

Sometimes, foreign objects like broken engine components, dust particles, small stones, dirt and leaves can enter your turbocharger, either via the compressor inlet or the turbine inlet.
These can then cause impact damage and abrasion to the compressor wheels and turbine blades, which will start to reduce the efficiency of the turbo. To prevent this happening, you need to ensure that your air filter is serviced regularly, and that you check your turbo for loose connections or debris.

Over-speeding

A turbocharger works by increasing the air pressure in an engine (check out our beginners FAQ for further info).
If there are any leaks, cracks or poor seals between the compressor and the engine, the turbo will have to work much harder than it should have to increase this pressure. This will reduce the efficiency and boost delivered by the turbo.

Other causes

In addition to the causes listed above, excessive exhaust gas temps (EGT's), moisture ingress, wear and tear, fuel intake systems, the wastegate and the exhaust system can also cause damage to your turbocharger.
The warning signs There are several ways that your vehicle will let you know that its turbo is in need of maintenance or repairs:
Check engine warning lights - On most modern cars, the computer diagnostics will pick up turbo faults and the check engine light will come on. Of course, the check engine light doesn't just cover turbo failure, and you will need to do some further checks to see what kind of engine problem you have.
The boost gauge - Some turbocharged vehicles are fitted with a boost gauge, which lets you know how much boost your turbo is producing (you can also fit one to your car if desired). If your boost gauge isn't going up as much as it used to, then there is a good chance your turbo is in need of repair.
Power loss - If you notice that your turbocharged vehicle is accelerating more slowly than usual, or isn't capable of reaching the speeds it once could, this may be a sign that your turbo is failing.
A smoking exhaust - If the turbo housing has cracked, or the internal seals have blown, oil will start to leak into your exhaust system. As this burns off, it produces a distinctive blue/grey smoke, which will probably become more apparent as the engine revs increase just following an idle situation.
A loud whining noise - Often, a failing turbocharger will make a loud, distinctive noise when under boost - a bit like a dentist's drill or police siren if compressor wheel damaged. If you start to hear this noise from your engine, it's definitely time to have it checked out!
The next steps - checking your turbo If you notice any of the warning signs, then get your turbo checked as soon as possible. Your turbocharger isn't going to repair itself, and the longer you leave it, the worse (and more expensive) the problem will get!
At AET, we're always happy to help with the cost-effective diagnosis and repairs on a full range of turbochargers. Alternatively, if you're mechanically minded and aren't afraid of looking under the bonnet, you can check for a range of faults yourself by inspecting the turbo.
Essentially, you are looking for signs of oil, excessive movement, impact damage and contact between the compressor wheel and housing.
Before you start the process, we recommend checking the air filter, exhaust system, breather system and fuel system on your vehicle are all working properly, as these can cause similar symptoms to turbo failure.
Once you've done that, you'll need to remove the air filter to gain access to the turbo. First, examine the exterior, checking for any signs of oil or loose connections.
Then, check the compressor wheel - it should be clean, without any dings, chips, or signs corrosive pitting. Look out for evidence of excessive movement, ensuring that the wheel can't touch the housing, and check to see whether the turbocharger is able to rotate freely.
I you are feeling particularly ambitious; you can also check the exhaust side of the turbo. First, remove the exhaust pipe all the way to the turbo, so you can see the turbine wheel. This should look clean, with no carbon build up, scale or oil along the surface, and the blades should be free from cracks, wear and damage.

Jan 13, 2018 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1987 saab 9000 turbo transmission


bad pressure plate or stuck throw out bearing.

Jun 06, 2012 | Saab 9000 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Turbo refuses to supply power when accelerating. Manual gear changing necessary to attain top (6th) gear.


The car goes in "limp home" mode:
After scanning the Engine Control Module (ECM) with a VAG or similar diagnostic tool you will find this: Fault code: P1557-Turbo Boost pressure control exceeded
1. Engine stopped and ignition switch off. Check all pneumatic connections and hoses between turbocharger actuator = pressure unit for boost-pressure control, boost-pressure control solenoid valve, vacuum reservoir, EGR control solenoid valve, intake-manifold flap solenoid valve, EGR valve with throttle - part of intake manifold. Also the vacuum connection between tandem pump and brake booster. If you find something wrong replace parts. If not go to step 2.
2. Extract the hose of the turbocharger actuator = pressure unit for boost-pressure control part of turbocharger. Instead of the original hose you must place another 1 meter long hose with the same inside diameter, and then you check to inspire yourself the air from the other one extremity of this hose. The mechanical connecting rod of the turbocharger actuator must have a smooth and whole motion. If you can do that with your mouth, then you must replace the boost-pressure control solenoid valve. If you can not reach this with your mouth, then you go to step 3.
3. This is the most difficult work. The problem is that the soot particles deposits inside the turbocharger plugging the variable nozzle geometry mechanism = adjustable vanes of the turbine. If the turbocharger actuator is not able to adjust the turbine vanes the charge air pressure increase too much and ECU (engine control unit) go in "limp mode" = engine protection software. As a result the "limp home" mode engine still running until you turn the engine off (ignition switch off) and back on when the "limp mode" is deactivated, but the fault still remain in ECU memory!
4. You must be able to extract the turbo from the engine and then to disassemble the turbocharger, clean inside adjustable vanes mechanism and refit all.

May 24, 2011 | Volkswagen Passat Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Where are the timing marks on a 1996 Mitsubishi eclipse?


If you have the 4-Cylinder Non-Turbo, or 420a engine, here is the overhaul manual for it, including the complete timing instructions: http://www.mediafire.com/?7j2zosdmnnl

If you have the 4-Cylinder Turbo, or 4G63 engine, here is the manual for it, including timing instructions: http://www.mediafire.com/?zhnttihoqye

Mar 18, 2011 | 1996 Mitsubishi Eclipse

1 Answer

Hi, vw experts, my engine light diagnosis was "turbo charger overboost" what might this mean? also, glow plug #4 cylinder circuit open. would this mean a faulty glow plug or faulty harness?...


First problem: "turbo charger overboost"
In your case the turbocharger is responsible for engine losing power.
The car goes in the "limp home" mode!!!
After scan the EDC-15P engine control unit with a VAG or KTS -BOSCH diagnosis tool you will find this: Fault code: P1557-Turbo Boost pressure control exceeded
1. Engine stopped and ignition switch off. Check all pneumatic connections and hoses between turbocharger actuator = pressure unit for boost-pressure control, boost-pressure control solenoid valve, vacuum reservoir, EGR control solenoid valve, intake-manifold flap solenoid valve, EGR valve with throttle - part of intake manifold. Also the vacuum connection between tandem pump and brake booster. If you find something wrong replace parts. If not go to step 2.
2. Extract the hose of the turbocharger actuator = pressure unit for boost-pressure control part of turbocharger. Instead of the original hose you must place another 1 meter long hose with the same inside diameter, and then you check to inspire yourself the air from the other one extremity of this hose. The mechanical connecting rod of the turbocharger actuator must have a smooth and whole motion. If you can do that with your mouth, then you must replace the boost-pressure control solenoid valve. If you can not reach this with your mouth, then you go to step 3.
3. This is the most difficult work. The problem is that the soot particles deposits inside the turbocharger plugging the variable nozzle geometry mechanism = adjustable vanes of the turbine. If the turbocharger actuator is not able to adjust the turbine vanes the charge air pressure increase too much and ECU (engine control unit) go in "limp mode" = engine protection software. As a result the "limp home" mode engine still running until you turn the engine off (ignition switch off) and back on when the "limp mode" is deactivated, but the fault still remain in ECU memory!
4. You must be able to extract the turbo from the engine and then to disassemble the turbocharger, clean inside adjustable vanes mechanism and refit all.


Second problem: "glow plug #4 cylinder circuit open"
Swap another glow plug in good condition by another cylinder, and see if the fault still occurs. If not, then this mean a faulty glow plug. If yes, then there is a bad harness.


Please do rate my response. Thanks!

Feb 17, 2011 | 2002 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

1 Answer

Need to remove the turbocharger from truck to replace oil cooler. Am unable to get it out. It is a 2003 ford 250 superduty tubo diesel 6.0 litre


1 - Remove the turbocharger intake tube
2 - Disconnect the charge air cooler inlet pipe
3 - Remove the push pins on turbo cowl
4 - Disconnect the turbo VGT solenoid
5 - Remove the oil supply tube
6 - Using the special tool, remove the oil feed tube
7 - Remove clamp from the turbo down pipe
8 - Remove the clamp from the turbo inlet
9 - Loosen the exhaust inlet pipe-to-EGR cooler clamp
10 - Loosen the RH & LH exhaust inlet pipe-to-exhaust manifold nuts
11 - Remove the rear turbocharger mounting bolt
12 - Remove the front mounting bolts
13 - Position the turbocharger and remove the turbocharger drain tube
14 - Remove the turbocharger

If you cant do it with these instructions put down your wrench and take to a dealership for a professional to work on it

Sep 03, 2010 | 2003 Ford F250 Super Duty Crew Cab

2 Answers

I have a 95 eagle talon tsi awd, when i push the hard and the boost gauge hits the top for a split second the car jerks. feels like something slips of engine loses power. also i had a stereo put in my car...


Replace your waste gate on the turbo charger. It may be weak and opening up before your at full boost, common to go bad after a few years from the heat of the turbo. Good luck and keep me posted.

Feb 16, 2010 | 1995 Eagle Talon

1 Answer

Turbocharger hose and black smoke


Blace smoke is fuel to much of it are you talking about the vaccume line thea goes from the turbo to a tee then the wast gate and a sensor under the air box thenthen up to the bottom of the air box?

Dec 11, 2008 | 1992 Mitsubishi Eclipse

1 Answer

'94 320i


Hello.

That doesn't sound right, I'd suggest getting the spoeedo checked. Even if you had the close ratio gear box which I think was fitted to the 4 cylinder engines, your speedo should be showing 160 km/h at 5000rpm in 5th.

Sep 10, 2008 | 1994 BMW 3 Series

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