Question about 1997 Chevrolet K1500

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I have a 97 k1500 that is burning fuel like crazy, it is running very lean, and seem to be misfiring often. I've change the spark pulgs and found that the entire left side 4plugs was black with suit. The truck seems to be running on 6 cyc at low rpms and when on the hwy it runs strong. I've took it to auto zone and had the computer scan for any codes and found out i had muti misfires on 3 cylc. and 02 sensor ,p0300,p1153,bank2 sensor 1, and p0151 ox sensor codes that are active. please help!! it has to be something im missing. ive changed the spider injector also put in new plugs, rotor, air filter, oil. so why is it still running so lean and ruff at times ?

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If its burning fuel and the plugs are black with soot, then its burning rich. the codes you said are P0300 generic misfire and P1153 heated O2 sensor B2 S1, I would first suspect that O2 sensor. Bank 2 is the passenger side (right side) of the engine and doesn`t explain why the left side plugs are black with soot, unless you say the left side by looking at the front of the engine. If this is the case then definitely replace the forward O2 sensor in front of the catalytic converter on the passenger side of the engine.

Posted on Apr 10, 2011

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Hi :) Check the Fuel Injection Pressure Regulator Its around $60.00 to buy and it controls the fuel pressure to the injectors it could be flooding the engine with fuel when you are idling and when you speed up the engine can burn that much fuel alot better.Here is a picture of what it looks like.
I have a 97 k1500 - j_chris_ward_22.jpg

Posted on Apr 10, 2011

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Cylinder 1 misfire detectedrich or lean air/fuel mixture fuel injecter fault and faulty crank shaft sensor


Wow... Thats a lot of diagnostic codes. First... The cyl #1 misfire will cause the Engine to run rich giving you a rich running engine. Therefore the rich lean code. This misfire on cyl #1 can also throw a crankshaft sensor code as it will slow down engine rpm. I would change the spark plug and ignition coil to cyl#1 and have the codes erased and see if that solves the problem. If not, you then need to persue any codes that may reappear.

Jun 06, 2015 | 1999 Kia Sephia

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2000 ford ranger misfire and running lean bank 1 and 2


Fix the misfire. The Car is running lean to protect the catalytic converter because of the miss fire in that cylinder or cylinders the fuel is not being burned. Which can damage the cat.

Oct 15, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

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98 ford mustang spark jumping from coil pack


Hi there:
Misfire is a common driveability problem that may or may not be easy to diagnose, depending on the cause. A misfiring cylinder in a four-cylinder engine is, pardon the pun, hard to miss. The loss of 25 percent of the engine power output is the equivalent of a horse trying to run on three legs. The engine may shake so badly at idle that it causes vibrations that can be felt in the steering wheel and throughout the vehicle.



Basically, it's one of three things: loss of spark; the air/fuel mixture is too far out of balance to ignite; or loss of compression. Loss of spark includes anything that prevents coil voltage from jumping the electrode gap at the end of the spark plug. Causes include worn, fouled or damaged spark plugs, bad spark plug wires or even a cracked distributor cap. A weak coil or excessive rotor gas inside a distributor would affect all cylinders, not just a single cylinder.


Lean misfire can occur when the air/fuel mixture is too lean (not enough gasoline in the mixture) to burn. This can be caused by a dirty, clogged or inoperative fuel injector; air leaks; or low fuel pressure because of a weak pump, restricted filter or leaky pressure regulator. Low fuel pressure would affect all cylinders rather than an individual cylinder, as would most air leaks. A leaky EGR valve can also have the same effect as an air leak. In fact, if a vehicle has one or more misfire codes and a P0401 EGR code, the fault is likely carbon buildup under the EGR valve.


Loss of compression means the cylinder loses most of its air/fuel mixture before it can be ignited. The most likely causes here are a leaky (burned) exhaust valve or a blown head gasket. If two adjacent cylinders are misfiring, it's likely the head gasket between them has failed. Also, if an engine is overheating or losing coolant, it's likely the head gasket is the culprit.


Intermittent misfires are the worst kind to diagnose because the misfire comes and goes depending on engine load or operating conditions. They seem to occur for no apparent reason. The engine may only misfire and run rough when cold but then smooth out as it warms up. Or, it may start and idle fine but then misfire or hesitate when it comes under load. Also, it may run fine most of the time but suddenly misfire or cut out for no apparent reason.




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Jun 18, 2012 | Ford Mustang Cars & Trucks

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Spark jumping from coil pack


Hi there:
Misfire is a common driveability problem that may or may not be easy to diagnose, depending on the cause. A misfiring cylinder in a four-cylinder engine is, pardon the pun, hard to miss. The loss of 25 percent of the engine power output is the equivalent of a horse trying to run on three legs. The engine may shake so badly at idle that it causes vibrations that can be felt in the steering wheel and throughout the vehicle.


Basically, it's one of three things: loss of spark; the air/fuel mixture is too far out of balance to ignite; or loss of compression. Loss of spark includes anything that prevents coil voltage from jumping the electrode gap at the end of the spark plug. Causes include worn, fouled or damaged spark plugs, bad spark plug wires or even a cracked distributor cap. A weak coil or excessive rotor gas inside a distributor would affect all cylinders, not just a single cylinder.

Lean misfire can occur when the air/fuel mixture is too lean (not enough gasoline in the mixture) to burn. This can be caused by a dirty, clogged or inoperative fuel injector; air leaks; or low fuel pressure because of a weak pump, restricted filter or leaky pressure regulator. Low fuel pressure would affect all cylinders rather than an individual cylinder, as would most air leaks. A leaky EGR valve can also have the same effect as an air leak. In fact, if a vehicle has one or more misfire codes and a P0401 EGR code, the fault is likely carbon buildup under the EGR valve.

Loss of compression means the cylinder loses most of its air/fuel mixture before it can be ignited. The most likely causes here are a leaky (burned) exhaust valve or a blown head gasket. If two adjacent cylinders are misfiring, it's likely the head gasket between them has failed. Also, if an engine is overheating or losing coolant, it's likely the head gasket is the culprit.

Intermittent misfires are the worst kind to diagnose because the misfire comes and goes depending on engine load or operating conditions. They seem to occur for no apparent reason. The engine may only misfire and run rough when cold but then smooth out as it warms up. Or, it may start and idle fine but then misfire or hesitate when it comes under load. Also, it may run fine most of the time but suddenly misfire or cut out for no apparent reason.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jun 18, 2012 | 1998 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

I own a 1994 Chevy K1500 5.7 Suburban that has hesitation and lack of power issues. It studders when I press on the gas pedal and most times has a delay in acceleration. In idle the RPM's seem to go up and...


The o2 sensor is a used for fuel trim, If you continue to run the truck with a lean condition, your likely to burn a valve, but a vacuum leak can cause a lean condition, and with the RPM acting that way, I would really check for a hissing sound on all the vac hoses, intake manifold, power booster, ect.. it won't hurt to check the fuel pressure, and if you remove the spark plugs you can read them for the lean condition. good luck

Feb 03, 2011 | Chevrolet Suburban 1500 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1996 gmc k1500 is misfiring what causes that


Hi,
The following resons given below might be responsible for the misfiring in your sierra K1500;
1.Faulty spark plugs or wires
2.Faulty coil (pack)
3.Faulty oxygen sensor(s)
4.Faulty fuel injector
5.Burned exhaust valve
6.Faulty catalytic converter(s)
7.Stuck/blocked EGR valve / passages

Here is a possible solution to the problem;
If there are no symptoms, the simplest thing to do is to reset the code and see if it comes back.


If there are symptoms such as the engine is stumbling or hesitating, check all wiring and connectors that lead to the cylinders (i.e. spark plugs). Depending on how long the ignition components have been in the car, it may be a good idea to replace them as part of your regular maintenance schedule.

I would suggest spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor cap, and rotor (if applicable). Otherwise, check the coils (a.k.a. coil packs). In some cases, the catalytic converter has gone bad. If you smell rotten eggs in the exhaust, your cat converter needs to be replaced. I've also heard in other cases the problems were faulty fuel injectors.


Random misfires that jump around from one cylinder to another (read: P030x codes) also will set a P0300 code. The underlying cause is often a lean fuel condition, which may be due to a vacuum leak in the intake manifold or unmetered air getting past the airflow sensor, or an EGR valve that is stuck open.


Good luck

Aug 02, 2010 | 1993 GMC Sierra K1500

1 Answer

I am having ongoing problems with the truck miss firing and rough running. Timing is ok, replaced cap and rotor,coil. It still starts rough,idles rough and misses when at cruising speed,although it seems...


Misfire is a common driveability problem that may or may not be easy to diagnose, depending on the cause. A misfiring cylinder in a four-cylinder engine is, pardon the pun, hard to miss. The loss of 25% of the engine's power output is the equivalent of a horse trying to run on three legs. The engine may shake so badly at idle that it causes vibrations that can be felt in the steering wheel and throughout the vehicle. The engine also may be hard to start and may even stall at idle, depending on the accessory load (air conditioning, headlights and electric rear defroster, for example).

When misfire occurs, performance suffers along with fuel economy, emissions and idle quality. And, when a misfiring vehicle is subjected to an emissions test, it will usually fail because of the unusually high levels of hydrocarbons (HC) in the exhaust.

What causes a cylinder to misfire? Basically, it's one of three things: loss of spark; the air/fuel mixture is too far out of balance to ignite; or loss of compression. Loss of spark includes anything that prevents coil voltage from jumping the electrode gap at the end of the spark plug. Causes include worn, fouled or damaged spark plugs, bad spark plug wires or even a cracked distributor cap. A weak coil or excessive rotor gas inside a distributor would affect all cylinders, not just a single cylinder.

"Lean misfire" can occur when the air/fuel mixture is too lean (not enough gasoline in the mixture) to burn. This can be caused by a dirty, clogged or inoperative fuel injector; air leaks; or low fuel pressure because of a weak pump, restricted filter or leaky pressure regulator. Low fuel pressure would affect all cylinders rather than an individual cylinder, as would most air leaks. A leaky EGR valve can also have the same effect as an air leak.

Loss of compression means the cylinder loses most of its air/fuel mixture before it can be ignited. The most likely causes here are a leaky (burned) exhaust valve or a blown head gasket. If two adjacent cylinders are misfiring, it's likely the head gasket between them has failed. Also, if an engine is overheating or losing coolant, it's likely the head gasket is the culprit.

Intermittent misfires are the worst kind to diagnose because the misfire comes and goes depending on engine load or operating conditions. They seem to occur for no apparent reason. The engine may only misfire and run rough when cold but then smooth out as it warms up. Or, it may start and idle fine but then misfire or hesitate when it comes under load. Also, it may run fine most of the time but suddenly misfire or cut out for no apparent reason. Intermittent misfires can be a real challenge to diagnose, so let's start with a steady misfire in one cylinder before moving on to intermittent misfires.

Hope this help.

Mar 25, 2010 | 1989 GMC Sierra

1 Answer

Engine light has come on and car is misfiring, loss of power, sounds rough


Main causes of misfire would be loss of spark; the air/fuel mixture is too far out of balance to ignite; or loss of compression.

Loss of spark includes anything that prevents coil voltage from jumping the electrode gap at the end of the spark plug. Causes include worn, fouled or damaged spark plugs, bad wires or even a cracked distributor cap. A weak coil or excessive rotor gas inside a distributor would affect all cylinders, not just a single cylinder.

"Lean misfire" can occur when the air/fuel mixture is too lean (not enough gasoline in the mixture) to burn. This can be caused by a dirty, clogged or inoperative fuel injector; air leaks; or low fuel pressure because of a weak pump, restricted filter or leaky pressure regulator.

Loss of compression means the cylinder loses most of its air/fuel mixture before it can be ignited. The most likely causes here are a leaky (burned) exhaust valve or a blown head gasket. If two adjacent cylinders are misfiring, it's likely the head gasket between them has failed. Also, if an engine is overheating or losing coolant, it's likely the head gasket is the culprit.

You can isolate the weak cylinder by temporarily disconnecting each of the spark plug wires, one at a time, while the engine is idling. When there's no change in the idle speed, then you have pinpointed the weak cylinder.

Aug 25, 2009 | 2001 Ford Focus

1 Answer

1999 vw jetta 2.0


Sounds like two problems. P0300 and P0303 are possibly spark plugs. They could be a coil pack but I'm leaning toward a spark plug problem because of the other two codes - they're indicating O2 sensor problems. If the O2 sensors are screwed up, the car reverts to preprogrammed, rich fuel maps that send excessive fuel through the engine. The reasoning is, if the ECU can't trust the O2 sensors to determine how much fuel to burn optimally, it'll pump a bunch of extra fuel through the engine to keep it safe. Having too little fuel (aka running lean) can destroy an engine, so the ECU plays it safe and runs rich (too much fuel) instead. The consequences of rich running are relatively minor compared to lean running, but can and do tend to create excessive carbon buildup on the catalytic converter and O2 sensors, as well as fouling spark plugs.

First thing to do though is to swap the wires on your coil packs and see if you end up with a misfire code for the same cylinder #3. If you do, then it's the plug or wire. If it moves, it's the coilpack. Replace whichever part is faulty. You'll probably need oxygen sensors too, before you can clear all the codes.

Aug 27, 2008 | 1999 Volkswagen Jetta

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