Question about Toyota Corolla

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Greetings, my name is Mat and i am in the process of installing new brake disc pads front and new brake shoes rear on my 1989 Toyota corolla 5 door, any help to make the process easy and straight forward would be appreciated, Thanks. Mat

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  • yadayada
    yadayada Apr 06, 2011

    Do just one wheel at a time, use the other side as a guide.

  • yadayada
    yadayada Apr 06, 2011

    Make sure you get the rotors machined or if badly worn or grooved replace them.

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Go to You Tube---watch several in repair shop
Videos, of what you want to do.

Posted on Apr 06, 2011

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Help with installing brake shoes on 1993 buick park ave


Your Buick has front disc brakes...and rear drum brakes...the usual concern is the front pads as they are used more...these are the easiest pads to replace...as you only need to remove the caliper from the rotor with 2 bolts to lift off...Be sure to push the piston all the way back into the caliper to install new pads...rotors are pop offs too...The rear drum is different...the brake shoes are held on with clips and springs...try keeping one of the shoe assemblies intact while you switch out the other shoes...be sure to inspect the rear wheel brake cylinders for possible leaking...usually an oil build up inside the brake drum...these are inexpensive and should be switched out on a 93 Buick...:) Hope this helps.

Apr 02, 2011 | 1993 Buick Park Avenue

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I have a 2003 toyota corolla S edition. I need to get the rear brakes replaced, but when I went to the parts store for rotors and pads, they told me I might need drums and shoes. How can I find out what...


The best way would be to remove the wheel and see if you have drums or discs. Disc brakes on the rear will look like the front brakes, as discs are required on the front of 1970 vehicles and newer. You will see the rotor which will be shiny where the pads have rubbed it. On a drum, it will look like a rusty metal bowl facing away from you. If you have custom wheels you may be able to see through the spokes, but dust guards will not let you tell from the back.

Mar 03, 2011 | 2003 Toyota Corolla

2 Answers

How to remove brake rotors on a 1996 ford explorer


How to replace the rear brake pads on a 1995 through 2001 Ford Explorer The system utilizes a drum-in-hat type rear brake rotor. The integral drum allows the use of a drum-and-shoe type parking brake system. All other components are similar to their front disc brake components Remove the two bolts on either side of the brake hose with the rubber boots. Do not remove the four bolts where the axle ties in. The two bolts to be removed require a 10mm socket/wrench. Loosen the pads from the caliper Rotor Removal In order to take the rotors off (replace with new or have them machined), it is best to loosen the emergency brake shoes. To do this, behind the rotors, in the back there is a rubber plug, remove that and you can use a screw driver to engage the teeth of the adjusting screw, turn it clockwise to loosen, usually 10-20 teeth. Usually this means turn it downward. After this, it may still be difficult to get the rotors off without tapping them. Use a rubber mallet and hit them from behind. Before really whacking the rotor, make sure you have loosened the adjusting screw enough. It may take heavy swings of the rubber hammer to do this. It will eventually break loose. Parking Brake You might want to check the parking brake while you are here. To remove:
  • Remove the rear disc brake rotor.
  • Remove the outboard return spring.
  • Remove the adjusting screw spring.
  • Remove the rear brake shoe hold-down spring and pin.
  • Remove the brake shoe adjusting screw and nut.
  • Remove the front brake shoe hold-down spring and pin.
  • Remove both parking brake shoes and the inboard return spring.
  • Check the parking brake lever for excessive wear and replace as necessary.
To install:
  • Position the front parking brake shoe to the backing plate and install the hold-down pin and spring.
  • Install the rear parking brake shoe with the inboard return spring.
  • Position the brake shoe adjuster screw and nut on the shoes and install the rear shoe hold-down pin and spring.
  • Install the brake shoe adjuster spring.
  • Install the outboard return spring.
  • Adjust the parking brake shoes and install the rotor, caliper and wheel.
  • Lower the vehicle and tighten the wheel lug nuts to 100 ft. lbs. (135 Nm).
ADJUSTMENT
  • Measure the inside of the drum portion of the rear brake rotor
  • Remove the rear disc brake rotor.
  • Using Brake Adjustment Gauge D81L-1103-A or equivalent, measure the inside diameter of the drum portion of the rear disc brake rotor.
  • Subtract 0.020 in. (0.508mm) from the first measurement, adjust the brake shoes to that size
  • Adjust the parking brake adjuster screw until the outside diameter of the parking brake shoes measures 0.020 in. (0.508mm) less than the drum measurement.
  • Install the rear disc brake rotor.
Reassembly Reassembly is easy. Put new or machined rotors back on by sliding them over the lugs (they should slide on easily.) Loosen bleeder valve (having a catch bottle handy is good). Push calipers in slowly (using a c-clamp or large channel lock pliers), close bleeder valve. Put on pads. Lubricate metal clips with small amount of anti-seize. Re-adjust the emergency brake by turning the opposite direction from loosening. Refill the brake master cylinder

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1 Answer

2001 Corolla LE Brakes are not strong


Could be many things to look at. 2001 Corolla, assume disc pads in front, and regular drum style brakes in rear. Generally, most of your braking will come from the front disc brakes, and no adjustment is provided in these. Rear drum brakes can be adjusted two ways. Manually, they are adjusted by accessing the adjustment "cog" or threaded rod via a slot in the back of the plate that the drum fits up against. This should be done when the brakes shoes are first installed. As an alternative, the brakes will automatically adjust when you apply the brakes while backing up. I'd suggest that you find a big old empty parking lot, without a lot of light poles to hit, and place car in reverse, get going about 5 MPH, then hit the brakes firmly to stop. Repeat this a dozen times and see what results you get.

I am, of course, assuming that the brake fluid level is good and you see no leaks from either the front calipers or the rear brake cylinders.

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2 Answers

How to install front brake shoes on 1998 toyota camry


just take off tire take a clip out and pull out front shoe and take off roter then the back push in the cylender with a c clamp and revers the process of the calaper might come off using boltes then same process

Aug 29, 2009 | 1998 Toyota Camry

1 Answer

1990 Toyota Corolla rear drums bad?


If your pads are completely gone then you may have damaged the drums if you still have any pads left or shoes if they are drum brakes then you still need to have your drums checked out for the proper size to still be there for the brakes to function properly. You won't know until you look at them or are shown them by a pro. who has measured and found them to be beyond reuse! If you had leaks then you will need to repair the brake calipers or the wheel cylinders depending on which system you have drum or disc they are different!!! Hope this helps someway !!
Swampratt200 AAAAEEE!!!!!!

Jul 05, 2009 | 1990 Toyota Corolla

1 Answer

Brake pedal losses pressure 1 to 2 pumps back to full pressure.


you still air in system or a bad master cylinder or brake booster.

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Your 89 Corolla has drum brakes at the rear.
The graciousness of a FIxYa rating would be greatly appreciated.

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1 Answer

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it should have disk brakes all round but shoes for the hand brake on the rear. unless you have the"poverty pack" it may just have shoes on the rear.....

Jul 10, 2008 | 2001 Toyota Corolla

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