Question about 1990 Toyota Pickup

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I have a clean 4x4 v6 pickup. It had the orig. brake master cylinder and obviously never had the brakes bled. It started using brake fluid like a bottle every 2 weeks. No caliper or wheel cylinder was wet. Finally a seal failed and brake fluid started to pour into the booster and and out the back of the MC. I bought a new MC and bench bled it and installed it. I re-bled it it again to get a good pedal. I assumed it fixed the fluid loss....Wrong, now it is back to using a small bottle every two weeks. Is the fluid being sucked into the intake manifold every time the brakes are applied? If so, where is the valve or accumulator or item that has malfunctioned located? Brakes work just fine otherwise, no grabbing, pulling, leaks on calipers or wheel cylinders. Help! What could be happening?

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  • Master
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Suggest you "look" for fluid loss issue. fluid has to go somewhere right? either a bad rear wheel cylinder.which inside of rear tires will be wet with brake fluid..either passenger side or drivers side. or a bad brake caliper on the front.which will tell on itself by leaking fluid onto the ground when brakes are applied..brake fluid leaking will tell on itself by inspecting the inside of each tire,on the inside of the tires,front to rear. thank you for choosing fixya.com.

Posted on Apr 06, 2011

  • unicorn8467
    unicorn8467 Jul 06, 2012

    What about the break lines? I just replace front short and rear long ones. Solved my problem.

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I replaced both front calipers and rotors on my 08 Escape. I then bled the brakes, but the pedal goes to the floor. What is going on ?


It has ABS so you have to bleed the brakes from the brake caliper up to the reservoir using a positive pressure brake bleeder. The unit holds the fluid and pushes clean fluid and the air up to the reservoir under pressure.

Sep 23, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Bled front brakes fine back ones not getting fluid


master cylinder have 3 sections. front, back and proportion valve.The valve control the pressure to the rear brakes.Start bleding from the master cylinder. if the pressure is good inspect the line for damage.if one line don;t have pressure replace master cylinder
Good luck

Aug 23, 2014 | 1985 Toyota Pickup

1 Answer

I just replaced the brake master cylinder and rear wheel cylinder on my 1987 toyota pickup, and now I have no fluid going to the back brakes. Bleeding them does nothing


check for fluid before and after the proportioning valve by disconnection the line after the valve and applying the brakes, if no fluid after valve try before valve if fluid is there then it is a bad proportioning valve. you did bleed the master cylinder before connecting the brake line and trying to bleed the brakes all at once right? If the master cylinder was not bled first then a lot of air may have been forced into the rest of the brake lines.

Oct 01, 2011 | 1987 Toyota Pickup

1 Answer

95 4x4 Toyota Forerunner V6 and ABS Brakes, When I'm driving in the morning or after the truck has sat still for 8 or more hours...the FRONT brakes start to lock up. If I pull over and sit for 10...


if it is only the front brakes locking up then i would say master cylinder but i have also seen where one of these fast lube places accidently put power steering fluid in the master cylinder and it will make all of the rubber seals swell and lock the brakes up but usually only after the vehicle has been driven for a while and you can pull over and let it cool down and take off again.they make a kit to check and see if the brake fluid is contaminated. good luck and let me know if this helped you .....................

Jun 13, 2011 | 1995 Toyota 4Runner

1 Answer

Need to know procedure for bleeding brakes on1987 gmc s15 2.8 litre 4x4 front disc w/abs


MANUAL BLEEDING

For those of us who are not fortunate enough to have access to a power bleeding tool, the manual brake bleeding procedure will quite adequately remove air from the hydraulic system. The major difference between the pressure and manual bleeding procedures is that the manual method takes more time and will require help from an assistant. One person must depress the brake pedal, while another opens and closes the bleeder screws.

In addition to a length of clear neoprene bleeder hose, bleeder wrenches and a clear bleeder bottle (old plastic jar or drink bottle will suffice), bleeding late-model ABS systems may also require the use of one or more relatively inexpensive combination valve pressure bleeding tools (which are used to depress one or more valves in order to allow component/system bleeding). To fully bleed the late model ABS systems, a scan tool should also be used to run the system through functional tests.
  1. Clean the top of the master cylinder, remove the cover and fill the reservoirs with clean fluid. To prevent squirting fluid, and possibly damaging painted surfaces, install the cover during the procedure, but be sure to frequently check and top off the reservoirs with fresh fluid.
CAUTION Never reuse brake fluid which has been bled from the system.
  1. The master cylinder must be bled first if it is suspected to contain air. If the master cylinder was removed and bench bled before installation it must still be bled, but it should take less time and effort. Bleed the master cylinder as follows:
    1. Position a container under the master cylinder to catch the brake fluid.
WARNING Do not allow brake fluid to spill on or come in contact with the vehicle's finish as it will remove the paint. In case of a spill, immediately flush the area with water.
    1. Loosen the front brake line at the master cylinder and allow the fluid to flow from the front port.
    2. Have a friend depress the brake pedal slowly and hold (air and/or fluid should be expelled from the loose fitting). Tighten the line, then release the brake pedal and wait 15 seconds. Loosen the fitting and repeat until all air is removed from the master cylinder bore.
    3. When finished, tighten the line fitting to 20 ft. lbs. (5 Nm).
    4. Repeat the sequence at the master cylinder rear pipe fitting.
During the bleeding procedure, make sure your assistant does NOT release the brake pedal while a fitting is loosened or while a bleeder screw is opening. Air will be drawn back into the system.
  1. Check and refill the master cylinder reservoir.
Remember, if the reservoir is allowed to empty of fluid during the procedure, air will be drawn into the system and the bleeding procedure must be restarted at the master cylinder assembly.
  1. On late model ABS equipped vehicles, perform the special ABS procedures as described later in this section. On 4 wheel ABS systems the Brake Pressure Modulator Valve (BPMV) must be bled (if it has been replaced or if it is suspected to contain air) and on most Rear Wheel Anti-Lock (RWAL) systems the combination valve must be held open. In both cases, special combination valve depressor tools should be used during bleeding and a scan tool must be used for ABS function tests.
  1. If a single line or fitting was the only hydraulic line disconnected, then only the caliper(s) or wheel cylinder(s) affected by that line must be bled. If the master cylinder required bleeding, then all calipers and wheel cylinders must be bled in the proper sequence:
    1. Right rear
    2. Left rear
    3. Right front
    4. Left front
  2. Bleed the individual calipers or wheel cylinders as follows:
    1. Place a suitable wrench over the bleeder screw and attach a clear plastic hose over the screw end. Be sure the hose is seated snugly on the screw or you may be squirted with brake fluid.
Be very careful when bleeding wheel cylinders and brake calipers. The bleeder screws often rust in position and may easily break off if forced. Installing a new bleeder screw will often require removal of the component and may include overhaul or replacement of the wheel cylinder/caliper. To help prevent the possibility of breaking a bleeder screw, spray it with some penetrating oil before attempting to loosen it.
    1. Submerge the other end of the tube in a transparent container of clean brake fluid.
    2. Loosen the bleed screw, then have a friend apply the brake pedal slowly and hold. Tighten the bleed screw to 62 inch lbs. (7 Nm), release the brake pedal and wait 15 seconds. Repeat the sequence (including the 15 second pause) until all air is expelled from the caliper or cylinder.
    3. Tighten the bleeder screw to 62 inch lbs. (7 Nm) when finished.
  1. Check the pedal for a hard feeling with the engine not running. If the pedal is soft, repeat the bleeding procedure until a firm pedal is obtained.
  2. If the brake warning light is on, depress the brake pedal firmly. If there is no air in the system, the light will go out.
  3. After bleeding, make sure that a firm pedal is achieved before attempting to move the vehicle.

Hope helps (remember to rate this answer).

Apr 13, 2011 | 1987 GMC Jimmy

1 Answer

I replaced the whole back break line,as i try to bleed them i get fluid out of the front passenger side and the back driver side,but nothing out of the other two.whats the problem?


Hi, your proportioning valve is stuck. Take the caps off and recenter the one stuck valve. Then rebleed the system using the procedure below. Thanks for using fixya.

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For those of us who are not fortunate enough to have access to a power bleeding tool, the manual brake bleeding procedure will quite adequately remove air from the hydraulic system. The major difference between the pressure and manual bleeding procedures is that the manual method takes more time and will require help from an assistant. One person must depress the brake pedal, while another opens and closes the bleeder screws.
  1. Deplete the vacuum reserve by applying the brakes several times with the ignition OFF .
  2. Clean the top of the master cylinder, remove the cover and fill the reservoirs with clean fluid.
  3. The master cylinder must be bled first if it is suspected to contain air. If the master cylinder was removed and bench bled before installation it must still be bled, but it should take less time and effort. Bleed the master cylinder as follows:
    1. Position a container under the master cylinder to catch the brake fluid.
    2. Loosen the front brake line(s) at the master cylinder and allow the fluid to flow from the front port.




WARNING Do not allow brake fluid to spill on or come in contact with the vehicle's finish as it will remove the paint. In case of a spill, immediately flush the area with water.

  1. Tighten the line connection(s).
  2. Have an assistant depress and hold the brake pedal.
  3. Loosen the line connection(s) again, allowing air to escape from the master cylinder.
  4. Tighten the line(s), then have the assistant release the brake pedal and wait for 15 seconds.
  5. Repeat steps D through F until the line(s) are free of air.
  6. When finished bleeding the air from the master cylinder, tighten the line connections to 20 ft. lbs. (27 Nm).
  7. Repeat steps B through H, only with the master cylinder rear pipe fitting(s).

  1. Refill the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid.



WARNING Never reuse brake fluid that has been bled from the system.

  1. If a single line or fitting was the only hydraulic line disconnected, then only the caliper(s) or wheel cylinder(s) affected by that line must be bled. If the master cylinder required bleeding, then all calipers and wheel cylinders must be bled in the proper sequence:
    1. Right rear
    2. Left rear
    3. Right front
    4. Left front

  2. Bleed the individual calipers or wheel cylinders as follows:
    1. Place a suitable wrench over the bleeder screw and attach a clear plastic hose over the screw end. Be sure the hose is seated snugly on the screw or you may be squirted with brake fluid.
    2. Submerge the other end of the tube in a transparent container of clean brake fluid.
    3. With the help of an assistant, apply the brake pedal slowly and hold.


During the bleeding procedure, make sure your assistant does NOT release the brake pedal while a fitting is loosened or while a bleeder screw is opening. Air will be drawn back into the system.
  1. While the assistant continues to apply pressure to the brake pedal, loosen the bleeder screw, and watch for air bubbles in the container.

Be very careful when loosening the wheel cylinder and brake caliper bleeding screws. The bleeder screws often rust in position and may easily break off if forced. To help prevent the possibility of breaking a bleeder screw, spray it with some penetrating oil before attempting to loosen it. Installing a new bleeder screw will often require removal of the component and may include overhaul or replacement of the wheel cylinder/caliper.
  1. Tighten the bleeder screw.
  2. Instruct the assistant to release the brake pedal.
  3. Wait approximately 15 seconds, and instruct the assistant to depress the brake pedal again.

Remember, if the reservoir is allowed to empty of fluid during the procedure, air will be drawn into the system and the bleeding procedure must be restarted at the master cylinder assembly.
  1. Repeat steps C through F until there are no air bubbles present in the container.

  1. Check the pedal for a hard feeling with the engine not running. If the pedal is soft, repeat the bleeding procedure until a firm pedal is obtained.
  2. If the brake warning light is on, depress the brake pedal firmly. If there is no air in the system, the light will go out.
  3. Once all the air is bled from the system, install the bleeder screw caps.
  4. After bleeding, make sure that a firm pedal is achieved before attempting to move the vehicle.

Feb 14, 2011 | 1994 Pontiac Grand Am

1 Answer

What is the sequence to bleed the brakes on a 1994 Chevy Suburban?


Bleeding the Brakes
EXCEPT HYDRO-BOOST OR ABS(see Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4)
To bleed the brakes on a vehicle equipped with ABS, please refer to the ABS bleeding procedure in this section.
The brake system must be bled when any brake line is disconnected or there is air in the system.
Never bleed a wheel cylinder when a drum is removed.
  1. Clean the master cylinder of excess dirt and remove the cylinder cover and the diaphragm.
  2. Fill the master cylinder to the proper level. Check the fluid level periodically during the bleeding process and replenish it as necessary. Do not allow the master cylinder to run dry, or you will have to start over.
  3. Before opening any of the bleeder screws, you may want to give each one a shot of penetrating solvent. This reduces the possibility of breakage when they are unscrewed.
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Fig. 1: Connect one end of a clear plastic tube to the bleeder screw and submerge the other end in clean brake fluid

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Fig. 2: Have an assistant pump, then hold in the brake pedal, while you bleed each wheel

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Fig. 3: Using the combination valve depressor-R/V Series

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Fig. 4: Using the combination valve depressor-C/K Series
  1. Attach a length of vinyl hose to the bleeder screw of the brake to be bled. Insert the other end of the hose into a clear jar half full of clean brake fluid, so that the end of the hose is beneath the level of fluid. The correct sequence for bleeding is to work from the brake farthest from the master cylinder to the one closest; right rear, left rear, right front, left front.
  2. The combination valve must be held open during the bleeding process. A clip, tape, or other similar tool (or an assistant) will hold the metering pin in.
  3. Depress and release the brake pedal three or four times to exhaust any residual vacuum.
  4. Have an assistant push down on the brake pedal and hold it down. Open the bleeder valve slightly. As the pedal reaches the end of its travel, close the bleeder screw and release the brake pedal. Repeat this process until no air bubbles are visible in the expelled fluid.
Make sure your assistant presses the brake pedal to the floor slowly. Pressing too fast will cause air bubbles to form in the fluid.
  1. Repeat this procedure at each of the brakes. Remember to check the master cylinder level occasionally. Use only fresh fluid to refill the master cylinder, not the stuff bled from the system.
  2. When the bleeding process is complete, refill the master cylinder, install its cover and diaphragm, and discard the fluid bled from the brake system.
HYDRO-BOOSTThe system should be bled whenever the booster is removed and installed.
  1. Fill the power steering pump until the fluid level is at the base of the pump reservoir neck. Disconnect the battery lead from the distributor.
Remove the electrical lead to the fuel solenoid terminal on the injection pump before cranking the engine.
  1. Jack up the front of the car, turn the wheels all the way to the left, and crank the engine for a few seconds.
  2. Check steering pump fluid level. If necessary, add fluid to the "ADD" mark on the dipstick.
  3. Lower the car, connect the battery lead, and start the engine. Check fluid level and add fluid to the "ADD" mark, as necessary. With the engine running, turn the wheels from side to side to bleed air from the system. Make sure that the fluid level stays above the internal pump casting.
  4. The Hydro-Boost system should now be fully bled. If the fluid is foaming after bleeding, stop the engine, let the system set for one hour, then repeat the second part of Step 4.
The preceding procedures should be effective in removing the excess air from the system, however sometimes air may still remain trapped. When this happens the booster may make a gulping noise when the brake is applied. Lightly pumping the brake pedal with the engine running should cause this noise to disappear. After the noise stops, check the pump fluid level and add as necessary.


Hope helps with this (remember comment and rated this).

Jun 19, 2010 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Install new brake pads and rotors all 4 wheels. Replaced front 2 calipers. Bled brakes. New clean fluid coming out. pedal is still soft and goes to floor. 200 Seebring.


Are you losing any Brake Fluid? Is it visible anywhere at the four wheels? Is it visible anywhere else?
The Master Cylinder may be defective. When you bled the Brakes did you maintain proper Brake Fluid Level in the Master Cylinder? If you didn't: and air entered into the Master Cylinder there maybe air within in the system in the Master Cylinder. You can bleed the Master Cylinder by removing the brake lines, adding more fluid, pumping the brakes, bleeding the air out of the system.
Are you losing Brake Fluid and can't find a noticeable leak? Then there is a good posibility that the rear seal in the Master Cylinder is leaking and the Fluid is going into the Brake Booster - which is the large wheel shaped drum located on the fire wall. In this case both the Brake Booster and the Master Cylinder will have to be removed and replaced. The Booster contains seals that Brake Fluid is very caustic to and will ruin these seals- causing future failures.
If no Brake Fluid is lost, no leak found: Check the Brake Booster Vacuum Advance. This should be connected to the outside of the Booster, attached to a hose, with the hose going to the engine. Check to see if this is working properly. Replace if needed.

Dec 31, 2009 | 2002 Chrysler Sebring

1 Answer

Do you have instructions on removing and replacing master cylinder in 1993 GMC Sierra K3500 pickup?


REMOVING
Removing the master cylinder is really simple, only requiring a few steps. Keep in mind that brake fluid will eat the paint of the car. So use a plastic or vinyl type fender cover to protect the vehicle's paint. Brake fluid is water soluble so if you should get some on the paint, wash it off with plenty of water as quickly as possible.
  1. Using a siphon, an old turkey baster works great, empty the master cylinder reservoir and dispose of the old brake fluid in the proper manner.
  2. Disconnect the wire connector for the brake fluid level and/or brake pressure-warning switch, if your vehicle is so equipped.
  3. Disconnect the brake lines from the master cylinder with a line wrench. A line wrench is specially designed to remove and install hydraluic fittings without rounding them off.
  4. Remove the master cylinder mounting nuts, then the master cylinder.
  5. On non-power brake vehicles, disconnect the master cylinder linkage from the brake pedal underneath the dash.
  6. On models with separate fluid reservoirs, remove the reservoir.
REPLACING
Before installing the new master cylinder on the vehicle, it must first be bled using a specialized bleeder kit. The master-cylinder bleeder kit comes with tubing, clips and multiple adapters. Most new or rebuilt master cylinders come with a bleeder kit for that particular master cylinder.
  1. Begin by removing the cap.
  2. Follow the directions that come with the kit to select the suitable adapters, and then connect the adapters and tubes to the ports on the cylinder. The other ends of the tube extend down into the master cylinder, and are held in place by a plastic clip. Figure 2.
  3. With the bleeder kit installed, fill the master cylinder about halfway with new brake fluid. Use a large screwdriver to depress the valve assembly inside the master cylinder. If you do not have a vise you can mount the master cylinder on the vacuum brake booster and bleed the master cylinder.
  4. Small bubbles will appear in the fluid. Continue working the valve assembly until no more bubbles appear. This indicates that the cylinder has been thoroughly bled.Reverse the removal procedure to install the master cylinder, noting the following Refer to your service manual for any Master Cylinder Push Rod Adjustment procedures if your vehicle requires it.Bleed brakes as described under Brake Bleeding.Operate the brakes several times and check for external hydraulic leaks.This is fairly straightforward job. Replacing a master cylinder should take you about 1 to 2 hours, depending on the make and model of car. If you are rebuilding the master cylinder, add about another hour or so.

Oct 12, 2009 | 1993 GMC Sierra K3500

1 Answer

No brakes 94 Nissan pickup


Hi

You sound like you are having fun !...............Not !

Brake Clamp, off all the brake hoses, and see if pedal returns ?

What have you done to the rear brakes, is the adjustment correct ?

I suspect your problem may be in the master cylinder area.?

Possibly the little rod behind the master cylinder ?

When you bled it, did the brake fluid pump out merrily ?

Let me know your thoughts !

John

Jan 18, 2009 | 1997 Honda Accord

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