Question about 1988 Ford F 350

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I'm not getting any spark to the plugs. Wondering if it is the ignition coils.

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I have the same problem... I replaced the distributor, distributor cap, button,control module, Ignition coil and even put a ignition/start switch on it.... and it finally fired up after the coil.. BUT..... it died 2 days later and i took the coil back for an exchange and it worked.... BUT.... it died on me when the truck warmed up and still does... Someone told me to check the CAMSHAFT POSITIONING SENSOR... makes sense so im gonna try that tomorrow and hope for the best.

Posted on Nov 06, 2008

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Cant find plugs on a 3.7 6 cylinder 2 wheel drive dakota please help


3.7L Engines
Each individual spark plug is located under each ignition coil. Each individual ignition coil must be removed to gain access to each spark plug. Refer to Ignition Coil Removal/Installation. Prior to removing spark plug, spray compressed air around base of ignition coil at cylinder head. This will help prevent foreign material from entering combustion chamber.

  1. Remove spark plug from cylinder head using a quality socket with a rubber or foam insert.
  2. Inspect spark plug condition.
To install:
  1. Start the spark plug into the cylinder head by hand to avoid cross threading.
  2. Before installing coil(s), check condition of coil o-ring and replace as necessary. To aid in coil installation, apply silicone to coil o-ring.
  3. Tighten spark plugs to 27 Nm (20 ft. lbs.) torque.
  4. Install ignition coil(s). Refer to Ignition Coil Removal/Installation.

Sep 21, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Anyone have the firing order diagram for a 2011 dodge nitro 4.0 liter v6? Also how do I get to the spark plugs on the drivers side? I can't figure it out!!!


Here ya go
Each individual spark plug is located under each ignition coil. Each individual ignition coil must be removed to gain access to each spark plug See: Ignition Coil\Service and Repair\Ignition Coil - Removal

  1. Remove necessary air filter tubing at throttle body.
  2. Prior to removing ignition coil, spray compressed air around coil base at cylinder head.
  3. Prior to removing spark plug, spray compressed air into cylinder head opening. This will help prevent foreign material from entering combustion chamber.
  4. Remove spark plug from cylinder head using a quality socket with a rubber or foam insert. Also check condition of ignition coil O-ring and replace as necessary.
  5. Inspect spark plug condition


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Aug 18, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Changed fuel pump. getting fuel to engine. but will not start.


Check for spark. Maybe a crankshaft position sensor is bad or a module.

Secondary Spark Test This spark tester looks just like a spark plug, attach the clip to ground and crank the engine to check for spark 91052p10.jpg
This spark tester has an adjustable air-gap for measuring spark strength and testing different voltage ignition systems 91052p11.jpg
Attach the clip to ground and crank the engine to check for spark 91052p12.jpg
This spark tester is the easiest to use just place it on a plug wire and the spark voltage is detected and the bulb on the top will flash with each pulse 91052p10.jpg
The best way to perform this procedure is to use a spark tester (available at most automotive parts stores). Three types of spark testers are commonly available. The Neon Bulb type is connected to the spark plug wire and flashes with each ignition pulse. The Air Gap type must be adjusted to the individual spark plug gap specified for the engine. The last type of spark plug tester looks like a spark plug with a grounding clip on the side, but there is no side electrode for the spark to jump to. The last two types of testers allows the user to not only detect the presence of spark, but also the intensity (orange/yellow is weak, blue is strong).
  1. Disconnect a spark plug wire at the spark plug end.
  2. Connect the plug wire to the spark tester and ground the tester to an appropriate location on the engine.
  3. Crank the engine and check for spark at the tester.
  4. If spark exists at the tester, the ignition system is functioning properly.
  5. If spark does not exist at the spark plug wire, perform diagnosis of the ignition system using individual component diagnosis procedures.
---
Ignition Coil Testing
  1. Remove suspect coil.
  2. Disable fuel pump by disconnecting inertia switch electrical connector.
  3. Reconnect the ignition coil electrical connector to the coil.
  4. Install spark tester 303-D307 (D81P-6666-A) or the equivalent.
  5. Crank engine while observing the tester.
  6. If a blue-white spark is not observed replace coil.
---
Removal & Installation To Remove:
  1. Remove the air cleaner outlet pipe if interfering.
  2. Disconnect the connector from the ignition coil. coilconn.gif

  3. Remove the bolt from the ignition coil. coilbolt.gif

  4. Remove the ignition coil on plug.
To Install:
  1. Install ignition coil on spark plug.
  2. Install ignition coil bolt. Tighten to 10 Nm (89 in. lbs.). coilbolt.gif

  3. Reconnect the ignition coil electrical connector. coilbolt.gif

  4. Install the air cleaner outlet pipe if removed earlier.
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Oct 28, 2010 | 1999 Ford Crown Victoria

1 Answer

Im wondering how easy it is to get at an igniter, where it is, how much stuff is hooked up to it,


auto parts stores or salvage yards can get this for you around $100 average, so make sure that this is what you need. Most are located on fender wells of engine compartment, trace middle or "coil" wire from distributor cap to it. Some vehicles have multiple igniters feeding one or two plugs each. ( example: Some Volvos have one on the end of each spark plug). 2 to 4 wires on it usually in a plastic connector and spark plug wire to cap (or plug)

Oct 01, 2010 | Toyota Paseo Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 1995 Olds 88 shakes and has a pretty bad vibration when the car gets up to about 55 MPH and drops down into overdrive. I was wondering if this is a transmission issue or perhaps motor mounts gone bad.


Hello Cransbottom.
The most likely issue here is a misfire.
When your car is at this speed and in overdrive it requires the most power from the ignition coil to jump the gap at the spark plug.
This is because the fuel mixture is very lean and the engine is putting out lots of torque.
The spark is jumping off at the weakest point rather than jumping the gap at the spark plug.
It could be at the ignition coil, a bad ignition wire or the spark plugs.
Remove the spark plugs and look carefully on the white insulator for black/brown streaks down the side. If there are traces, replace the spark plugs and the ignition wires. The wires will be burned on the inside of the boot and the spark will track down there as well.
This is called carbon tracking.
This will also occur on the ignition coils but is more rare.
I have fixed many of these cars with the same symptom as you are experiencing and I believe you should begin with that.

KL

Apr 29, 2010 | 1995 Oldsmobile Eighty Eight

1 Answer

Engine turns over, won't start, no fire at plugs. There's plenty of fuel, and no fire from any of the plugs. All fuses and fusible links are good. I pulled the plugs to check for a spark, and there's no...


What are you wondering is correct. Let check the coil first. if coil is good the there is a problem with the ignition module. If the ignition module is good then a problem with the crankshaft sensor. The coil can be checked by measure resistance of the terminals of the primary coil and secondary coil separately to see if it open. To check if it can generate a spark, once you identify the primary coil terminal, run 12 V wire to these terminal, connect a spark plug to the secondary coil, by just leaving a spark plug with connected with spark plug wire and let it touch the engine chassis. Now you have to make pulses at the 12 volts connection by making a break and connection several time to turn it on and off to generate the spark at spark plug. The ignition module is supposed to do what you are doing now to generate the spark. If it is bad, it can't do what you did then a spark is not generated. For the crankshaft sensor, only the shop can tell you it is bad or not. Good luck.

Nov 14, 2009 | 1995 Honda Civic

1 Answer

How to check a 2002 kia sedona ignition coil


first, does the motor have 2 or 3 coils? if so, check the ohms on the ones you know is good, then check the ohms on the other one. if they're about the same, they might be fine. other than that theres the ignition module usually located under the coil packs. i dont know how to check it, but if you think its bad, contact your local trusted mechanic and see if he knows how to check it. modules usually run about 70-100 dollars, depending on the manufacturer. you could also check the crankshaft position sensor, but usually if that goes, the whole engine will misfire.
also, the ingition system has what you call a "dead spark." for example, you have 3 coils on the car, and two cylinders are fired by 1 coil. while one cylinder is on its compression stroke, the other is on its exhaust stroke, and when it fires it sends the spark to both cylinders at once. thats why the spark going to the one on its exhaust stroke is the dead spark.
hope this helps!!!
justin.mccaleb@yahoo.com

Apr 17, 2009 | 2004 Kia Sedona

2 Answers

Lost ignition...turns over but no spark


make sure that the distributor module is ok first.Check that the ign coil is getting a pulse signal when engine is turning,and check ecm fuse and that engine is grounded to frame.

Nov 25, 2008 | 1989 Dodge Dakota 2WD

2 Answers

1990 Subaru Legacy shorted out the ignition coil. I replaced it and in less than 1 mile,it shorted out the new one.


Subaru engines (including Legacy and engines of many other automobiles, GM, etc.) have returned to so-called wasted spark ignition systems since advent of the electronic distributor-less ignition (having been used historically in early engines with magneto ignitions). With this approach, the ignition systems are less expensive and usually quite reliable. At the same time, however, a shorted spark plug (cracked or carbon clogged, etc.) (or bad ignition spark plug wire) grounds both the ignition spark and the false spark being used. This means that it also grounds the corresponding respective ignition spark of the other 180 degree out of phase cylinder (that uses the same the same coil because the spark current is connected to the spark plugs of two cylinders). Since such a defect allows more current to flow in the spark coil to two plugs when the resistance of the spark plug gap disappears due to a cracked plug, etc, it seems likely to hasten coil burn out if the spark plug/plug wire defect is not corrected before installing the new spark coil.

To explain further, wasted spark means that when a cylinder is ready to fire, it gets a spark to its spark plug while part of the spark (from the same coil and current) as a sort of copy is also sent to another cyclinder at the same time but when the piston in that cylinder is exhausting its ignited gases 180 degrees out of phase from when its spark is needed. When the second cylinder is ready to fire and receives its "spark, the first cyclinder the also receivesa "wasted" spark "copy" of the one needed by the second cylinder. Economy is achieved in manufacture because otherwise electronics would have to turn on and off four different spark coils to distribute four different sparks as needed to the four cylinders. With wasted sparks (which are cheap), because the spark current of one coil is connected (internally in the ignition coil unit) to two cylinders that are in the same position but 180 degrees out of phase in firing, the system can turn on and off two spark coils twice as fast with half the electronics and fire two cylinders that are 180 degrees out of phase. A four cylinder engine thus uses only two coils, a six cylinder engine, three coils, etc., in a wasted spark system.

Jul 27, 2008 | Subaru Legacy Cars & Trucks

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