Question about Toyota Land Cruiser

1 Answer

Glowplugs dont work - Land Cruiser Toyota Cars & Trucks

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Corporal:

    An expert that hasĀ over 10 points.

    Problem Solver:

    An expert who has answered 5 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 10 Answers

Check glow plug fuse, glow plug relay, glow plug switch, or replace glow plug.

Posted on Apr 03, 2011

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

2007 ford courier 2500 L have to turn over for a long time would it be glow plugs if so where do i find them


If this is a diesel, the glowplugs are in the heads similar to how sparkplugs are installed.

You should first check several other parts. The glowplugs get their power from a Timer. The Timer sometimes is combined with a power relay or the power relay is separate. The power relay is turned on by a signal from the Ignition switch.

So if the Timer, Power Relay, or power feed off the Ignition switch, is defective, the glowplugs will not work.

Check one of the wires to the glowplugs with a Voltmeter. The Timer will send several pulses to the glowplugs and then need to cool off.

The glowplugs only work for a few minutes for the initial start.

If the above parts are good, then check the glowplugs by removing and using battery jumper cables.

Clamp one to the base of the glowplug avoiding the threads, then briefly touch the top of the glowplug with the other polarity jumper.

Caution--you can melt them. Just observe if one stays dark longer than another. A dark glowplug is bad, a bright glowplug is good. Its all relative.

Please comment on my info.

Mar 31, 2013 | 2007 Ford Ranger 2.5

1 Answer

MY 93 FORD 350 7.3 I PUT SWITCH ON AND START CLICKING RIGHT AWAY BEFORE WILL TAKE FEW MINUTES SEEMS LIKE T GLOW PLUG IS NOT WORKING RIGHT IF I PLUG THE ENGINE WILL START WITH NO PROBLEM ,SOME PEOPLE


This is not to hard to solve. The outside airtemp determines how long the Glowplug timer works for absolute cold starts. Starting a warm engine is affected by underhood temps.

The Timer Relay will pulse power to the glowplugs. If the glowplugs are good, it is enough to preheat the cylinder for firing.

To tell if a glowplug is good is a matter of comparision between a new glowplug and a worn glowplug. YOU CAN MELT A GLOWPLUG WITH THIS TEST, but you remove the glowplugs, get a set of battery jumper cables and place one jumper to the base of the glowplug USING CARE not to ruin the threads on the glowplug.

You do not want to arc the spark on the glowplug threads. You want your fixed jumper connector locked on the base of the glowplug. The other battery cable jumper is touched to the top of the glowplug where the arcing occurs. This will not hurt the contact point if done properly.

You compare the "glow" of the old glowplug to the "glow" of the new glowplug. Bad glowplugs stay dark or operate at a darker color.

The Timer Relay gives you pulses and that is all the glowplugs get to heat up. This is what you simulate in your test. If a glowplug operates in a dull or dark condition, it is bad and throw it away. You want all glowplugs to readily light up when power is applied.

The other 2 parts to the system are the Timer Relay and the Power Relay. The timer gets its power from the Power Relay and the Power Relay is like a starter solenoid. The Power relay gets a tickler charge when the keyswitch is held to Start.

There are sometimes extreme cold Timers that hold the power longer tothe glowplugs. I do not have the Specs to tell you if your Timer is kicking out to soon.

I hope my solution helps. I have told you how to test your glowplugs. The timers are affected by air temperature and that makes it difficult to say if it is working long enough. If you know the glowplugs are good, and the timer shuts off before the glowplugs heat up, then you need a new or different type of timer.

Sep 26, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to change glow plugs


Quick lesson Diesel 101, repair only what is broken. There is no reason to replace glowplugs if they work. There are other things that make the glowplugs work or fail to work.

You should be able to follow the wires from the glowplugs up to a box or module. This module is a timer. Its job is to vary the length of time the glowplugs work depending on atmospheric temperature and engine temperature. Then follow the wires from the timer module to a power relay. This part receives the signal from the ignition switch and transfers high power to the timer module.

Only when these are checked, should you blame the glowplugs. For glowplug testing you take them out and use battery jumper cables. You hook one terminal to the base and avoid crushing the threads. You then touch the other battery cable to the top of the glowplug. You can melt them, so do not overdo it.

When you find the brightest, that is your benchmark. Bad glow plugs only have as long as the timer allows for them to glow. Replace the darker ones, use the brighter ones.

Other than that point, glowplugs have no adjustment and come out like regular sparkplugs.

I hope this was helpful.

Jan 25, 2012 | Mitsubishi Galant Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

HARD STARTING IN THE MORNING [DIESEL ENGINE]


Hello, The diesel engine relies on Glowplugs for the first start in the Morning or a cold start at anytime.

The Glowplugs themselves can be bad, but there is a Timer which determines how long the Glowplugs will stay on. Before the Timer is a Glowplug Relay which gives the Timer its power to operate. The Ignition switch provides power to the Glowplug Relay.

You disconnect a Glowplug wire, put on a test instrument (either a testlight or Voltmeter) and look to see what happens when you initiate a start. If the testlight lights and cycles a few times like a pulse, then the power supply is good. If not inspect the Timer and Glowplug Relay for continuity

If all the pulses seem to reach the Glowplugs, then most likely the Glowplugs are worn out. Test by removing then and connecting battery jumpers. Briefly touch the top terminal of the Glowplug with the Hot cable after grounding the negative cable on the base of the Glowplug, avoiding the threads.

You can melt a Glowplug. But if you find the Glowplug staying dark, then it is bad. Do this for all the Glowplugs and replace the bad ones. Remember the Glowplug only has the amount of time the Timer gives it to work. So if a few pulses do not make it Glow, then replace it. This should fix you up.

Aug 24, 2011 | 2005 Ford Expedition

1 Answer

I have a 2004 ford f250 with a 6.0 diesel that is loosing water in the cooling system but is not leaking. There is no water in the oil. There is the possibility of a little steam in the exhaust like a...


Hello, If this is an Automatic with trans cooling lines, check the Dipstick for water droplets. It is possible to get antifreeze in the trans if the Radiator is leaking between the upper and lower chambers.

But for the most part, it sounds like the water is getting back into the heads. You also should check the Glowplug timer and the glowplugs to see if they have discoloration. The bad cylinders will taint the color of the glowplug. Glowplugs show running conditions just like sparkplugs do.

You will see bubbles in the Radiator tank when the engine runs. There are stop leak products but you have too much compression in a Diesel for them to work. About the best you can do is look at the Glowplugs and hope that all the problems are on one side of the engine. Then you only have to pull 1 head instead of 2.

Jul 15, 2011 | 2005 Ford F 350 Super Duty

1 Answer

2002 Ford F450 7.3 Diesel. Will not start. I use to have to keep truck pluged in all the time for it to start. Now it will not start at all. Turns over fine. Fuel is fine just will not start?? Please...


Hello, Most likely your Glowplug Relay is bad, and it supplies power to the Glowplug Timer which also may be bad.

Just follow the wires that are on the Glowplugs up to the Glowplug timer. Use a Voltmeter and check if the power wire that goes into this Timer has fire when the Ignition is turned to the RUN position. If there is fire going into the Timer from the power Relay, pull off one of the Glowplug wires and ground 1 end of a testlight and put the other end on the Glowplug wire.

The Timer itself will kill the power after a predetermined time based on Temperature. The colder the engine, the longer the Glowplugs stay lit. If you have power reaching the Glowplug, your power Relay is fine. You just have to observe how quick the Timer stays on.

The Glowplugs only have 1 or 2 chances to do their job at the Start-up. They are needed to make a Diesel start cold. Cold meaning at outside AIR temperature, and engine block temperature. There should be clicks under the hood and the lights should flicker in rhythm to the clicks if the Timer is working.

If you find that both the Timer and Power Relay are working, the Glowplugs need to be tested. They come out like sparkplugs. But you test them either on a special machine or use battery jumper cables. To test, hook one battery cable to the Glowplug base, avoiding the thread. Then take the other cable and arc it on the top of the Glowplug.

Caution, you can melt the Glowplug. If you get a bright glow, the Glowplug is good. If the Glowplug is dark or very slow to glow, it is bad. This should be all you need. Would appreciate a note after you fix it.

Jul 06, 2011 | Ford F-450 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Ok i have a 2004 ford f350 superduty 6.0 i have changed ficm crankshaft position sensor in it it has 1684 lbs of oil pressure. I dont understand why it want start could it be a fuel pump ive changed the...


Are your glowplugs cycling? You have both a Timer and a Relay on the starting circuit for the glowplugs. The engine is 100% dependent on having the glowplugs work for a cold start.

Use a test light or voltmeter and test a few glowplug wires to see if they are getting fire. If they are not getting fire, work your way along the firewall from the glowplug wires and check for power coming out of the Timer box and for power going into the Timer box. If you have no power going into the Timer box, then follow the wires to the Relay box and check for power there. Keep going until you find out where you are losing power.

Now if you have power at the glowplugs, then remove a few and test them for fouling. You can melt them, but using jumper cables you can provide power and see if they glow. Remember the glowplugs only get pulses of power and that is all they have to work with. So a glowplug that remains dark, or is slow to glow is not doing you any good.

If there is an access point to observe the timing chain or valve rocker moving, it would be good since you already put in a crankshaft sensor. Some of the sensors are adjustable and the engine may just be out of time.

If you are getting pressure the pump should be working, I am not certain about the recommended PSI, kinda thought it was higher, but it should start with what you have if you are talking fuel pressure.

Did you prime the new fuel filter with diesel? You may need to pressure check the lines from the filters to the tanks to see if an animal chewed a rubber line.

I would appreciate a note on what you finally discovered and I hope my solution is very helpful to you.

May 18, 2011 | 2006 Ford F-250 Super Duty

1 Answer

On a 1992 ford diesel 7.3 L cold it start run good, but after setting 30 min. you go to start it again and it will not start. If you turn the key on and off about four or five times it will start with a...


It sounds like your Glowplug timer or the Glowplugs are bad. The reason that turning the Key 4 or 5 times helps, is that everytime you put the Key to RUN or START you are energizing the Glowplug timer and reheating the Glowplugs.

You can check the Glowplugs by removing them and remove at least 1 bank at a time. Get some jumper cables and put the NEG post on the plug without smashing the threads. Take the POS cable and touch the Glowplug till it starts to Glow. You can mess up and melt the Glowplug so watch it. BUT, as you test you will find the bad Glowplugs will not light or will take longer to light up.

This is the reason I said to take out 4 plugs at a time, minimum, because you need to compare bad and good, visually.

The timer is not as easy to test. It is a variable timer and the warmer an engine is, the less time it will work. Obviously if the Glowplugs are not Hot, the timer is cutting off too early. But you check your Glowplugs first. The Glowplugs help to give a Feedback loop which tells the timer to stay on.

The rough idle is because the glowplug is not hot or the compression is bad in the cylinder.

Oct 02, 2010 | Ford E-350 Super Duty Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

A relay in the dash board ic clicking and truck wont start its a 1999 f250 super duty diesel. it turns over but wont start. i just installed new fuel pump its working fine


It sounds like the "Timer" for the glowplugs, but you may want to prime the Fuelfilter to provide a draw for the fuel. One of the problems is you lost the fuel in the lines as soon as the fuelpump was disconnected.

If you installed the fuelpump because of a "NO start" condition it may have been the Glowplug timer all along. You may have taken a wire loose for the Timer or broken a wire. The Timer box needs feedback from the Glowplugs.

Disconnect one of the Glowpug wires and put in a test light to the wire. Observe when you put the engine in RUN position if the Testlight will light up. If the Testlight does not light, you are not getting power to the Glowplugs.

Diesels need Glowplugs only for starting. After that, the compression operates the engine. The Timer for the Glowplugs regulates how long the Glowplugs work each cycle. You may have to test the Glowplugs if they get power but do not work.

Each Glowplug is like a sparkplug. You would need to pull them and connect 12 Volts to each. Use a jumper cable and do not touch the threads. Use power sparingly or you can melt them. But 1 by 1 you can see a difference in a bad or good glowplug by how each gets hot.

Aug 14, 2010 | 1999 Ford F250 Regular Cab

1 Answer

NO POWER TO GLOWPLUGS


check the supply voltage to the heater plugs should have good battery voltage,i suspect a broken wire ,if memory serves me correctly it is near the air filter but dont rely on that i dont anymore.surprised that engine need them to work ,thats the common rail 1 isnt it ?

Dec 29, 2008 | 2001 Volvo S60

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cars & Trucks Logo

Related Topics:

162 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Toyota Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

75807 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22133 Answers

Jeff Turcotte
Jeff Turcotte

Level 3 Expert

8172 Answers

Are you a Toyota Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...