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I just rebuilt the block piston rings rods mains seals everything new head for my 1997 geo metro and when i first start it it runs for 10 seconds then dies and when i try to start it right after that it turns over but no compression... before i thought it was the hydraulic lifters but pulled them apart cleaned them and put back together still does it... it is the same sound as if you had your spark plugs out and turned your motor over.. but my plugs are in....it did this before i pulled the motor out and redid it.. but before it was a different head and the crank and piston rod #1 were torn up. i sent them in and had the crank welded and the rod ground... assembled the motor put it in and still the same problem as before? it makes me think it may be a sensor or something it has been driving me crazy.. I have asked many many people and still noone has seen anything like this.. anyone have any ideas?

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Is your timing correct? if not your valves may be open on the compression stroke, or you may have a vacuum leak in the intake duct.

Posted on Apr 02, 2011

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Geo metro troubleshooting


First stepwould typically be to replace the PCV valve. It's located behind the valve cover at the bottom of the rubber tube that connects to the back of the valve cover and branches off to the air filter housing.

Alternate possibility:

If the head gasket has been replaced, it's likely one of the oil returns is blocked (replacement head gaskets, for whatever reason, don't usually align with the head correctly). The solution is to open the secondary oil return. I used a one foot piece of 4 gauge bare copper wire (more of a 1/4" copper rod). Remove the valve cover. Taper the end of the copper wire to a blunt point and drive it about 6 inches down the oil return on the backside of the head near the rear of the head (directly behind where the oil filler cap was).

Apr 13, 2014 | 1994 Geo Metro

1 Answer

Does a 1996 Geo Metro have the same engine as a 1997 Geo Metro?


join a metro forum,

few cars on earth had one engine , most have options
the metro had 3.
so if both cars had the same engine , are they the same.
is the real question.
read the wiki on geo metro.
here is one other issue , quoted
1997 featured the four-cylinder engine with a new sixteen-valve head (rather than the eight valves of the earlier design)

that means the EFI is different and head. (at least)

Jan 17, 2013 | Geo Metro Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

What is the piston ring end gap for a 1991 geo metro 3 cylinder 1liter?


The end gap is derived from the bore size. For the 2.91" (74mm) Geo 3 cyl bore, the top ring end gap is .004" divided by bore, so that is 2.91" / .004 = .012". The second ring and oil ring should be bore divided by .005", so that is 2.91" / .005 = .015". Don't file the springy part of the oil ring, as it is designed to compress and fit snuggly; just file the top and bottom ring that sandwich the springy part.

Dec 05, 2010 | 1990 Geo Metro

2 Answers

We have a 1997 toyota camry, my daughter has been driving it and was checking the wrong dip stick, hense the engine needed to be rebuilt due to running w/ no oil. the mechanic replaced the seals, pt head...


I would think that the shop would have seen a problem with the belt, but you never know. You might think of that when you consider the oil use, my best guess is that whom ever rebuilt the engine installed the piston rings up side down. That would make it use the oil. The power steering fluid must be leaking and could be many things but sense you just had the engine out I would look around the lines were they attach to the pump, also some times there will be some oil use after an overhaul until the piston rings seat but this seams like to much oil use for that better go have a long talk with your shop...

Nov 14, 2010 | 1997 Toyota Camry

2 Answers

What make my 1993 blazer smoke


there are a few reasons for the engine to smoke. first determine the color of the smoke, white smoke means its burning water...possible bad head gasket or cracked block or cylinder heads. If the smoke is black...means the fuel mixture is to rich, getting to much fuel. If the color is blueish...it is burning oil, meaning the oil rings are worn, and or the valve seals are worn as well. if it smokes when you first start it, and then stops after a few minutes, once the engine is warmed up...probably bad valve seals. if it continues to smoke it is more likely the oil rings. Valve seals being cheaper and easier to repair, where as the oil rings means the motor needs to be rebuilt or replaced.

Nov 08, 2010 | 1993 Chevrolet S-10 Blazer

1 Answer

The engine has blown. I need to replace it or change pistons and rings. How difficult is it to change pistons and rings?


It can be time consuming and the end result may not be desirable if you haven't done it before.
--- The following is just a sample of what to do once the engine is torn down: Pistons and Connecting Rods
  1. Before installing the piston/connecting rod assembly, oil the pistons, piston rings and the cylinder walls with light engine oil. Install connecting rod bolt protectors or rubber hose onto the connecting rod bolts/studs. Also perform the following:
    1. Select the proper ring set for the size cylinder bore.
    2. Position the ring in the bore in which it is going to be used.
    3. Push the ring down into the bore area where normal ring wear is not encountered.
    4. Use the head of the piston to position the ring in the bore so that the ring is square with the cylinder wall. Use caution to avoid damage to the ring or cylinder bore.
    5. Measure the gap between the ends of the ring with a feeler gauge. Ring gap in a worn cylinder is normally greater than specification. If the ring gap is greater than the specified limits, try an oversize ring set. Fig. 5: Checking the piston ring-to-ring groove side clearance using the ring and a feeler gauge tccs3923.gif

    6. Check the ring side clearance of the compression rings with a feeler gauge inserted between the ring and its lower land according to specification. The gauge should slide freely around the entire ring circumference without binding. Any wear that occurs will form a step at the inner portion of the lower land. If the lower lands have high steps, the piston should be replaced. Fig. 6: The notch on the side of the bearing cap matches the tang on the bearing insert tccs3917.gif

  2. Unless new pistons are installed, be sure to install the pistons in the cylinders from which they were removed. The numbers on the connecting rod and bearing cap must be on the same side when installed in the cylinder bore. If a connecting rod is ever transposed from one engine or cylinder to another, new bearings should be fitted and the connecting rod should be numbered to correspond with the new cylinder number. The notch on the piston head goes toward the front of the engine.
  3. Install all of the rod bearing inserts into the rods and caps. Fig. 7: Most rings are marked to show which side of the ring should face up when installed to the piston tccs3222.gif

  4. Install the rings to the pistons. Install the oil control ring first, then the second compression ring and finally the top compression ring. Use a piston ring expander tool to aid in installation and to help reduce the chance of breakage. Fig. 8: Install the piston and rod assembly into the block using a ring compressor and the handle of a hammer tccs3914.gif

  5. Make sure the ring gaps are properly spaced around the circumference of the piston. Fit a piston ring compressor around the piston and slide the piston and connecting rod assembly down into the cylinder bore, pushing it in with the wooden hammer handle. Push the piston down until it is only slightly below the top of the cylinder bore. Guide the connecting rod onto the crankshaft bearing journal carefully, to avoid damaging the crankshaft.
  6. Check the bearing clearance of all the rod bearings, fitting them to the crankshaft bearing journals. Follow the procedure in the crankshaft installation above.
  7. After the bearings have been fitted, apply a light coating of assembly oil to the journals and bearings.
  8. Turn the crankshaft until the appropriate bearing journal is at the bottom of its stroke, then push the piston assembly all the way down until the connecting rod bearing seats on the crankshaft journal. Be careful not to allow the bearing cap screws to strike the crankshaft bearing journals and damage them.
  9. After the piston and connecting rod assemblies have been installed, check the connecting rod side clearance on each crankshaft journal.
  10. Prime and install the oil pump and the oil pump intake tube.
  11. Install the auxiliary/balance shaft(s)/assembly(ies).
OHV Engines CAMSHAFT, LIFTERS AND TIMING ASSEMBLY
  1. Install the camshaft.
  2. Install the lifters/followers into their bores.
  3. Install the timing gears/chain assembly.
CYLINDER HEAD(S)
  1. Install the cylinder head(s) using new gaskets.
  2. Assemble the rest of the valve train (pushrods and rocker arms and/or shafts).
OHC Engines CYLINDER HEAD(S)
  1. Install the cylinder head(s) using new gaskets.
  2. Install the timing sprockets/gears and the belt/chain assemblies.
Engine Covers and Components Install the timing cover(s) and oil pan. Refer to your notes and drawings made prior to disassembly and install all of the components that were removed. Install the engine into the vehicle. Engine Start-up and Break-in STARTING THE ENGINE Now that the engine is installed and every wire and hose is properly connected, go back and double check that all coolant and vacuum hoses are connected. Check that your oil drain plug is installed and properly tightened. If not already done, install a new oil filter onto the engine. Fill the crankcase with the proper amount and grade of engine oil. Fill the cooling system with a 50/50 mixture of coolant/water.
  1. Connect the vehicle battery.
  2. Start the engine. Keep your eye on your oil pressure indicator; if it does not indicate oil pressure within 10 seconds of starting, turn the vehicle OFF. WARNING
    Damage to the engine can result if it is allowed to run with no oil pressure. Check the engine oil level to make sure that it is full. Check for any leaks and if found, repair the leaks before continuing. If there is still no indication of oil pressure, you may need to prime the system.
  3. Confirm that there are no fluid leaks (oil or other).
  4. Allow the engine to reach normal operating temperature (the upper radiator hose will be hot to the touch).
  5. At this point any necessary checks or adjustments can be performed, such as ignition timing.
  6. Install any remaining components or body panels which were removed. prev.gif next.gif

Oct 17, 2010 | 1995 Ford Thunderbird

1 Answer

I have a 1996 geo tracker 16 valve rebuilt a 1990


your timing may be off because of the valve timing. have you seen this done before or you just trying your luck. i really dont know but are all of your sensors the same? is the firing order the same?

Nov 10, 2009 | 1991 Geo Tracker

1 Answer

Replaced to valves on center piston on 1990 geo


timming is not the issue, sounds like the valve seals are leaking, or the piston rings are severly worn. these engines are fairly simple to just rebuild the entire engine.....ie...seals,rings gaskets, maybe a have the head dropped off and have it checked for cracks or warpage.

Sep 22, 2009 | Chevrolet Metro Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Piston ring installation on 96 geo 1.3 liter 4 cyl engine.


If you are that deep into things you will do poorly without a good manual. Are the pistons new or used?If they are used you need to completly clean the ring grooves in the pistons or the new rings will stick and gall.Did you remove the ridge at the top of the cylinders? If not there is a good the top ring will either break or bust the upper land off of the piston. Hopefully you had a machine shop go through the block. Check the ring manufacture's web site. I am sure they will have tips and instructions.

Nov 29, 2008 | 1996 Geo Metro

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