Question about 1994 Volvo 850

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Could water in engine oil be due to turbo charger failure white smoke emitting from exhaust and coolant is not holding in reservoir engine oil looks like chocolate milk would a turbocharger rebuild kit fix my problem

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If your turbo has coolant passages for cooling then it is possible. Most likely the issue is failed head gasket. You need to do a compression check or a cylinder leak down test to rule out a failed head gasket.

Posted on Mar 28, 2011

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What to do when 2006 Chrysler Pacifica engine temp warning light comes on?


Do not continue to operate. Operating an overheated engine will cause the engine to fail.

After the engine has cooled,
Confirm that the engine has coolant.
Confirm that the reservoir is full to the mark
Start engine and confirm as engine gets warm cooling fan at radiator turns on

Confirm that the rubber engine belt is working
Put in car heater to full hot and blower on.
Confirm heat is hot from car heater.
If heater is not hot possible water pump failure or air in coolant system keeping the coolant from circulating.
Allow to cool completely.
Remove cap start engine and observe coolant flowing at or near cap. Observe bubbling or exhaust gases coming from radiator

Check for water in oil by pulling dip stick
  • White smoke from the exhaust pipe
  • Overheating engine
  • Bubbles in the radiator or coolant overflow tank
  • White milky oil
  • Significant loss of coolant with no visible leaks
If milky likely a blown head gasket

Hope this helps?
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Jun 29, 2017 | Chrysler Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

My car has white smoke coming from the exhaust


he causes of white exhaust smoke can vary; however, it is common to see white exhaust smoke when first starting a car, especially on cooler days. This is generally steam caused by condensation. As the engine warms up and the condensation dissipates the white exhaust smoke (steam) is no longer seen. If excessive white exhaust smoke is present well after the engine warms up, it is necessary to have the car inspected for possible internal coolant leaks. Indicators of an internal coolant leak include billowing white exhaust smoke accompanied by a sweet odor or a low coolant reservoir level. An internal coolant leak can also contaminate the engine oil giving it a frothy, milky appearance. Even small amounts of coolant entering the combustion chamber will produce white exhaust smoke.
One of the main causes of white exhaust smoke and coolant loss is a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by overheating. A cracked head may allow coolant to leak into one or more cylinders or into the combustion chamber of the engine. Dirty coolant, a poorly maintained cooling system, a low coolant level, or a non-functioning cooling fan can cause engine overheating. In addition, engine wear can eventually cause the gaskets to lose their capacity to seal properly allowing internal coolant loss. Intake manifold gasket and head gasket failures are two of the most common sources of internal coolant loss caused by engine wear.
Never remove the radiator cap or coolant reservoir cap while the engine is hot or running as it can cause serious injury; always allow the car to cool down completely first. Checking for a low coolant level in the reservoir is the first step in determining if coolant loss is causing the white exhaust smoke. If the coolant reservoir is at the proper level but excessive white exhaust smoke is present, a cooling system pressure check is required to determine where, if any, coolant leaks are located.

Nov 17, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

6 Answers

2002 monte carlo ls 3.4l Fill coolant reserve up when car cold. Run car till reach normal temperature. Check coolant reserve, coolant gone. No leaks, no coolant smell. Where is it going?


there is either a pocket of air or the car is burning the coolant if there is no leak. check inside the car for any coolant leaking under the dash if so the heater core has a hole in it.

Apr 22, 2015 | 2002 Chevrolet Monte Carlo

1 Answer

My 1998 Mazda millenia Is shorting white smoke more tell pipe what could be the problem


It is common to see white exhaust smoke when first starting a car, especially on cooler days. This is generally steam caused by condensation. As the engine warms up and the condensation dissipates the white exhaust smoke (steam) is no longer seen. If excessive white exhaust smoke is present well after the engine warms up, it is necessary to have the car inspected for possible internal coolant leaks. Indicators of an internal coolant leak include billowing white exhaust smoke accompanied by a sweet odor or a low coolant reservoir level. An internal coolant leak can also contaminate the engine oil giving it a frothy, milky appearance. Even small amounts of coolant entering the combustion chamber will produce white exhaust smoke. One of the main causes of white exhaust smoke and coolant loss is a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by overheating. A cracked head may allow coolant to leak into one or more cylinders or into the combustion chamber of the engine. Dirty coolant, a poorly maintained cooling system, a low coolant level, or a non-functioning cooling fan can cause engine overheating. In addition, engine wear can eventually cause the gaskets to lose their capacity to seal properly allowing internal coolant loss. Intake manifold gasket and head gasket failures are two of the most common sources of internal coolant loss caused by engine wear.
Never remove the radiator cap or coolant reservoir cap while the engine is hot or running as it can cause serious injury; always allow the car to cool down completely first. Checking for a low coolant level in the reservoir is the first step in determining if coolant loss is causing the white exhaust smoke. If the coolant reservoir is at the proper level but excessive white exhaust smoke is present, a cooling system pressure check is required to determine where, if any, coolant leaks are located. THESE LEAKS WILL CAUSE SEVERE ENGINE DAMAGE! Have the car inspected immediately.

I
Internal coolant leaks can and will cause

Jul 30, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I changed the turbo now white smoke coming out of my exhaust


This seems to be a symptom of a blown head gasket.
White exhaust smoke is an indication of water / coolant in the exhaust. The car running sluggish and using lots of fuel can be caused by compression loss.

Look at the coolant level color and smell (with cold engine - don't open the high pressure reservoir with engine hot as hot coolant may spray you in the face). If you have a blown gasket, the coolant color may become brownish and it may smell bad or the level will get lower even if you have just refilled the cooling system.

What you can also check for is bubbles in the reservoir. With engine cold, remove the reservoir cap. Start the engine. Try to rev the engine (or have someone do it) and observe if there are bubbles in the reservoir tank. If you see lots of bubbles, you have a blown gasket.

Dec 05, 2013 | 2001 Oldsmobile Intrigue

3 Answers

2002 SAAB is releasing white smoke out of tail pipe and stalling


White smoke out the exhaust is a sign of either water in the fuel or coolant being burned with the fuel. Observe if you have any coolant consumption and if not, wait until your tank to empt and filled up with new fresh good quality gasoline and you will be allright. If you have a coolant consumption you will need a tool to pressure test the coolant system and find where is leaking. You can purchase it at Harborfreight tools. Could be head gasket, Throtllebody gasket, intake gasket and others... Good luck.

Dec 25, 2012 | 2002 Saab 9-5

1 Answer

White smoke from Exhaust


hardly likely the exhaust job would cause that, but yes it sounds like you got a blown head gasket. badl lock stricks hmm! also preasure test cylinder head for leaks

Jul 22, 2009 | 2005 Renault R5

1 Answer

Water and white smoke comming out exhaust


your cooling system is preasureising due to a leaking cylinder head gasket the white smoke you see is coolant passing through the exhaust valve on the offending cylinder have the cooling system tested for CO content hope this advice helps

Feb 24, 2009 | 2001 Pontiac Grand Am SE

1 Answer

White smoke exhaust


White smoke is caused by coolant or water coming out the tail pipe. There is a chance that the white smoke was caused by water splashing up from a puddle onto the exhaust pipe. Keep an eye on the coolant level in the radiator in any event. If its less then there leak coolant leak in the car engine which is causing this problem....

Oct 18, 2008 | 1988 Isuzu Impulse

8 Answers

Saab 9-5 blowing white smoke from exhaust


One way to check for a blown head gasket, is to simply smell the coolant reservoir. Pop the cap, and see if it smells like raw gas. Every headgasket, I've diagnosed has had this smell, even if the oil is not contaminated. Another way is to hook up a coolant pressure tester, and run the vehicle for 15-20 mins or so. If the head gasket is blown, the pressure will exceed 15 psi. sometimes as high as 25 psi. If there is oil in the coolant overflow tank, the head is cracked, about 90% of the time.
I'm working on a 03 Saab 95 2.3l t. This vehicle smokes on initial start up, then the smoke disapates, and the vehicle is fine. Another mechanic diagnosed it as bad valve seals. I disconnected the pcv system, and the vehicle no longer smokes. If the valve seals have gone bad, the vehicle will smoke on acceleration. Also if the turbo seals are leaking it will smoke more heavily on acceleration.

Sep 09, 2008 | 1999 Saab 9-5

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